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Persuasive writin g. What is it?. Taking a position FOR or AGAINST a debatable issue and convincing a reader to accept your point of view on that issue. . Persuasive writing can be used to…. Support a cause Urge people to action Make a change Prove something wrong Stir up sympathy

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What is it
What is it?

Taking a position FOR or AGAINST a debatable issue and convincing a reader to accept your point of view on that issue.


Persuasive writing can be used to
Persuasive writing can be used to…

  • Support a cause

  • Urge people to action

  • Make a change

  • Prove something wrong

  • Stir up sympathy

  • Create interest

  • Get people to agree with you


Persuasive essay format
Persuasive essay format:

  • INTRODUCTION consisting of an interesting opener that funnels to a thesis (position) statement.

  • CONCESSION consisting of the admission and refutation of an opposing view.

  • PRO paragraphs where your arguments are asserted and supported with evidence.

  • CONCLUSION where the thesis is restated and the reader is left with something to think about.


How do i start
How do I start?

1. Read your prompt or begin brainstorming topics ( Choose something that affects you personally!).

2. Pick a side and draft a thesis (position) statement.

3. Know your audience

  • Who do I need to convince?

  • What tone would best serve my purpose?


PLAN

In order to convince the reader, you need facts and examples to support your opinion. What can you do when you cannot research?


PLAN

Make sure you have the essential components to each paragraph:

INTRO: Interesting opening

Thesis

CON: Opposing view

Refutation addressing that view


PLAN

PRO #1 &2: Assertion (Your first argument in support of your position)

Evidence

Elaboration

Evidence

Elaboration


PLAN

CONCLUSION: Restatement of thesis

Call to action


Drafting do and don ts
Drafting Do and Don’ts

DO

  • Remember that organization is key to coherence and clarity.

  • Remember that your two main pro arguments must be different from your refutation in the concession paragraph.

  • Save your strongest argument for the second pro paragraph.


Drafting do don ts
Drafting Do & Don’ts

DON’T:

  • Use first or second person pronouns.

  • Be wishy-washy.

  • Forget to support your opinions with facts and examples.

  • Neglect the interest getting opener and lasting impression.

  • Forget to be you!


How do i start1
How do I start?

  • Always begin with the thesis statement in mind. How can you get the reader there?

    • Riddle

    • Bold statement

    • Quotation

    • Interesting fact

    • Anecdote

    • Fact/statistic

    • Question

    • Setting a sceneSample intro


Concession
Concession

  • Transition to an opposing view. What are people most likely to say in objection to my position?

  • Once you’ve admitted an opposing view, you must refute it, belittle it, or accept it, but be sure to bring the reader back to your position.

  • Sample CON

  • Step by step CON


Pro paragraphs
Pro Paragraphs

  • Follow the same structure we’ve been working on: assertion, example, elaboration.

  • Step by Step PRO


Conclusion
Conclusion

  • Begin by rewording your thesis.

  • Find a way to bring the reader back to your opening thoughts or issue a call to action.

  • Sample conclusion


But it all begins with a topic
But it all begins with a topic…

  • What do you care about?

  • What pet peeves can you explore?

  • What issues directly affect you?


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