Rhode island model academy for personnel evaluating teachers
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Rhode Island Model Academy for Personnel Evaluating Teachers. Day 3 : Student Learning Objective.

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Rhode island model academy for personnel evaluating teachers

Rhode Island ModelAcademy for Personnel Evaluating Teachers

Day 3: Student Learning Objective

The contents of this training were developed under a Race to the Top grant from the Department of Education. However, those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.


Agenda

Agenda

  • Welcome

  • Understanding SLOs

  • Writing Objective Statements

  • Break

  • Using Baseline Data/Info

  • Deepening Assessment Literacy

  • Lunch

  • Planning for Your School


Norms

Norms

  • Equity of voice

  • Active listening

  • Safety to share different perspectives

  • Confidentiality

  • Respectful/appropriate use of technology

  • Usage of the Parking Lot


Updated measures of student learning

Updated Measures of Student Learning

Student Outcome Objectives (SOOs)

  • Very similar to SLOs

  • Designed for educators for who instruction is not their primary responsibility

  • Some special educators and many support professionals may set SOOs

  • For additional information:

    • Teacher Model Addendum or MSL Guidebook for 2013-2014

    • Online module: “Special Educators and SLOs/SOOs”


Other student learning 2013 2014 updates

Other Student Learning 2013-2014 Updates


Introduction framing

Introduction & Framing

Session 1: Understanding SLOs

Objectives:

Evaluators will be able to:

  • Understand how SLOs are an integral part of curriculum, instruction, and assessment

  • Articulate key steps to take in order to implement SLOs successfully

  • Understand layout and functionality of all online tools


Understanding slos

Understanding SLOs

  • PARTICIPANT PACKET:

  • Utilize the note taking template

  • Jot down key messages that you feel would be important to communicate to your teachers

  • p. 3


Layout and functionality of online tools

Layout and Functionality of Online Tools


Layout and functionality of online tools1

Layout and Functionality of Online Tools

  • Menu shows an outline of the module

  • Each slide is labeled

  • Allows for you to select sections that you would like to review


Understanding slos1

Understanding SLOs

  • HISTORY SCREEN SHOT


Understanding slos2

Understanding SLOs

Table Talk: What would you like alignment to look like this year?

How will you communicate this?

How might you think through school wide foci or priorities?

Feel free to chart what you might do differently if you think others in the room might benefit.


Layout and functionality of online tools2

Layout and Functionality of Online Tools


Layout and functionality of online tools3

Layout and Functionality of Online Tools


Understanding slos takeaways

Understanding SLOs Takeaways

  • SLOs are focused on the student learning in specific content areas and grade levels

  • SLOs are integrated with the most important work of districts--curriculum, instruction, and assessment--and are not an add-on

  • Goal-setting is an important part of effective teachers' practice


Understanding slos3

Understanding SLOs

Participant Packet: Page 3


Slo process overview

SLO Process Overview

p. 11


Updates to the slo form

Updates to the SLO Form

  • Revised based on feedback

  • Framed with Essential Questions

  • Changes include:

    • Removing the Level of Standardization section (which was often confused with assessment quality)

    • Re-sequencing the order of the elements

    • Collapsing Evidence Source, Administration, and Scoring into one category

p. 13


Updates to the slo form in epss

Updates to the SLO Form in EPSS

  • Revised based on feedback:

    • Focus Groups

    • Outreach sessions

  • Changes mirror the changes made to the Anatomy of an SLO

  • SLOs can now be submitted individually


Rhode island educator data points

Rhode Island Educator Data Points

  • Understand the experience and needs of educators across Rhode Island

  • Adjust accordingly and thoughtfully

  • RIDE Statewide Mid-Year Survey

  • Significant response rate

    • 4,450 Teachers

    • 400 Building Administrators


Rhode island educator data point

Rhode Island Educator Data Point

  • Setting appropriate, but rigorous SLO targets

  • Determining the Baseline, including gathering and interpreting data

  • Identifying or creating the evidence or assessments for the Evidence Source(s)

  • Writing an Objective Statements that focused on the appropriate content or skills

Teachers surveyed expressed that the following aspects of writing an SLO were most challenging:

RIDE Statewide Mid-Year Survey

N = 4,550 teachers


Writing an objective statement

Writing an Objective Statement

Session 2: Writing an Objective Statement

Objectives:

Evaluators will be able to:

  • Clarify the process for writing an objective statement

ONLINE TOOLS

Writing an Objective Statement (online module)


Online module writing an objective statement

Online Module: Writing an Objective Statement

The Four-Step Process


Writing an objective statement takeaways

Writing an Objective Statement Takeaways

  • When educators create their SLO Objective Statements, they should follow these four steps:

    • Examine their standards and curriculum

      2) Determine their Priority of Content

      3) Write an objective statement

      4) Check the scope, or grain-size


Online module writing an objective statement1

Online Module: Writing an Objective Statement

Instructional Leader

Learner

Participant Packet: Page 4


Writing an objective statement1

Writing an Objective Statement

Table Talk: How might you support teachers in collaborating in grade level or content-alike teams to engage in the 4 Step Process?

What additional support might new teachers need to engage in this process?

Chart how you might differentiate this for new and returning teachers.

Instructional Leader


Agenda1

Agenda

  • Welcome

  • Understanding SLOs

  • Writing Objective Statements

  • Break

  • Using Baseline Data/Info

  • Deepening Assessment Literacy

  • Lunch

  • Planning for Your School

Stretch your legs and take a gallery walk and review the charts.

Jot down any additional ideas from your colleagues.


Using baseline data information to set slo targets

Using Baseline Data/Information To Set SLO Targets

  • Session 2: Using Baseline Data/Information to Set SLO Targets

  • Objectives:

  • Evaluators will be able to:

  • Understand the purpose of baseline data

  • Be able to identify several sources of baseline data

  • Understand how baseline data can be used to set targets

  • ONLINE TOOLS

    1. Using Baseline Data/Information To Set SLO Targets (online module)


    Slo process baseline data and targets

    SLO Process: Baseline Data and Targets


    Rhode island educator data point1

    Rhode Island Educator Data Point

    Teachers surveyed expressed that the following aspects of writing an SLO were most challenging:

    • Setting appropriate, but rigorous SLO targets

    • Determining the baseline, including gathering and interpreting data

    • Identifying or creating the evidence or assessments for the Evidence Source(s)

    • Writing an Objective Statements that focused on the appropriate content or skills

    RIDE Statewide Mid-Year Survey

    N = 4,550 teachers


    Rhode island educator data point2

    Rhode Island Educator Data Point

    78% of teachers whose approval process included substantial revisions cited ‘targets’ as a reason for their SLO revisions

    Do Now

    Find someone across the room and discuss:

    Based on your experience with the model, how did the target setting process go?

    RIDE Statewide Mid-Year Survey

    N = 4,550 teachers


    Online module baseline data and info

    Online Module: Baseline Data and Info

    Instructional Leader

    Learner

    Participant Packet: Page 7


    Online module using baseline data and info

    Online Module: Using Baseline Data and Info

    Data and Information

    Baseline Data and Targets


    Baseline data c an be used to

    Baseline data can be used to….

    • Turn and Talk:

    • How might this information help clarify data use for your teachers?


    Online module baseline data and info1

    Online Module: Baseline Data and Info

    Instructional Leader

    Learner

    Participant Packet: Page 7


    Deepening assessment literacy

    Deepening Assessment Literacy

    • Session 3: Deepening Assessment Literacy

    • Objectives:

  • Evaluators will be able to:

  • Develop a shared understanding of the various types and purposes of educational assessment

  • Identify best practices for local assessment development

  • ONLINE TOOLS

    1. Deepening Assessment Literacy (online module)


    Rhode island educator data point3

    Rhode Island Educator Data Point

    Building Administrators surveyed expressed a desire for additional SLO-related training to focus on the following topics:

    Determining Rigor of Target on Student Learning Objectives

    1st

    Supporting teachers in their Student Learning Objective writing

    2nd

    Quality of Evidence and assessment-literacy

    3rd

    RIDE Statewide Midyear Survey

    N = 400 building administrators


    Online module deepening assessment literacy

    Online Module: Deepening Assessment Literacy

    Viewing the majority of this Module

    Consider new learnings for you and your teachers


    Assessment literacy takeaways

    Assessment Literacy Takeaways

    • Assessment is integral to teaching because it tells us what students know and are learning

    • Assessment selection/design should always begin with your purpose

    • SLOs are measured with summative assessments, though other types should be used for progress monitoring

    • Alignment, format, item type, administration, and scoring all contribute to the validity of assessment data


    Assessment swap meet

    Assessment Swap Meet

    • Find someone new and exchange one of the following discussion items:

      • Which key takeaway resonated most with you

      • Something that you learned that surprised you

      • A key message you plan to take back to your teachers

        2. After each partner has shared, find someone new and repeat by

        sharing new item (from list above).

        3. Repeat until you’ve shared three times.


    Deepening assessment literacy1

    Deepening Assessment Literacy

    Mark a passage that:

    • Confirmed something you already knew with an *

    • Challenged something you thought you knew with a ?

    • Made you think with a !

    10 min

    10 min


    Agenda2

    Agenda

    • Welcome

    • Understanding SLOs

    • Writing Objective Statements

    • Break

    • Using Baseline Data/Info

    • Deepening Assessment Literacy

    • Lunch

    • Planning for Your School


    Welcome back assessment quick review

    Welcome Back: Assessment Quick Review

    1. Assessment development should always begin with identifying the:

    • format

    • purpose

    • scale

    • vendor

      2. Summative assessments are primarily used to:

    • Inform instruction

    • Screen/identify

    • Measure outcomes


    Assessment quick review

    Assessment Quick Review

    3. Formative assessments should be used:

    • To monitor progress toward SLO targets

    • As evidence on SLOs

      4. In educational assessment, the constructis:

    • The intended audience of the assessment

    • What the assessment is supposed to measure

    • The format of the assessment

    • How the assessment is constructed


    Assessment quick review1

    Assessment Quick Review

    5. If you weigh 160 pounds, and every time you step on the scale it reports your weight as 190 pounds, that scale is:

    • Valid, but not reliable

    • Reliable, but not valid

    • Neither valid nor reliable

      6. NECAP score reports are an example of:

    • Quantitative data

    • Qualitative data


    Assessment quick review2

    Assessment Quick Review

    7. Which of the following item types is most likely to produce false positives?

    • Multiple choice

    • Fill-in-the-blank

    • Constructed response

      8. Adding more items and norming scorers are two strategies for:

    • Increasing rigor

    • Decreasing cheating

    • Increasing reliability

      9. Written comments about student’s photography portfolios are an example of:

    • Quantitative data

    • Qualitative data


    Assessment quick review3

    Assessment Quick Review

    10. Which of the following could be used as baseline data:

    • Final grades in a pre-requisite course

    • Pre-test scores

    • Assignments from the first few weeks of school

    • All of the above

      11. Which of the following is an example of a modification:

    • Providing a scribe to a student with a broken wrist

    • Simplifying the numbers in a word problem for a student with a specific learning disability

    • Enlarging print for a student with a visual impairment

      12. Teacher-created performance tasks can be used as evidence for SLOs:

    • True

    • False


    Assessment quick review4

    Assessment Quick Review

    13. What is validity?

    • The degree to which the assessment measures what it is supposed to measure

    • The consistency of assessment results across multiple administrations

    • The degree to which the assessment is free from bias

      14. Which of the following are true of pre-test/post-test models:

    • It is difficult to equate forms

    • Pre-test scores may be deflated

    • Post-test scores may be inflated

    • All of the above


    Deepening assessment literacy2

    Deepening Assessment Literacy

    • Session 4: Planning for Your School

    • Objectives:

    • Evaluators will be able to:

    • Become familiar with Assessment Toolkit

    • Conduct Needs Assessment

    • Discuss Baseline Data Scenarios

    • Collaborate with your colleagues to establish a school specific plan for implementing SLOs and utilizing online resources

    ONLINE TOOLS

    1. Assessment Toolkit


    Online module assessment toolkit

    Online Module: Assessment Toolkit


    Sample professional growth goal

    Sample Professional Growth Goal


    Planning for your school needs assessment

    Planning for Your School: Needs Assessment

    10 min

    10 min

    • In your meeting spot discuss:

    • 2 reasons why you prioritized this tool

    • 1 challenge you see in trying to use the tool


    Online module assessment toolkit1

    Online Module: Assessment Toolkit

    Instructional Leader

    Learner

    Participant Packet: Page 6


    Planning for your school data scenarios

    Planning for Your School: Data Scenarios

    15 min

    5 min

    Participant Packet: Page 8


    Data scenario 1

    Data Scenario #1

    When you sit down with Mr. Jacobs, a Biology teacher, to talk about his SLOs, he says that he does not have any baseline data. As he puts it, this is the first Biology course his 9th graders have taken and the students matriculate from three different middle schools. There is no standardized 8th grade Science curriculum in your district, so his students may have learned different things last year. What guidance would you give him? What could he use as sources of baseline data/information?


    Data scenario 2

    Data Scenario #2

    Ms. Palmer and Mrs. Gray are your two 4th grade teachers. They come to you because they are overwhelmed by the amount of information they have on their incoming students. In addition to students’ official records and state assessment scores, the 3rd grade teachers have passed on writing and Social Studies portfolios, EOY reading levels, and detailed comments on each child’s behavior, interests, strengths, and areas for improvement. They don’t know where to begin. What guidance would you give them? How can this information be useful to them as their write their SLOs?


    Data scenario 3

    Data Scenario #3

    Mrs. Scotto teaches French I to sixth graders at your middle school. She does not understand why she has to include baseline data in her SLO because none of her students speak any French at the beginning of the interval of instruction. How would you describe the purpose of baseline data/information to Mrs. Scotto and what recommendations might you give for possible sources that would be of use to her?


    Data scenario 4

    Data Scenario #4

    Mr. DuBois is an 11th grade English teacher. Prior to setting targets for his SLO, he reviewed his students’ grades and writing samples from their 10th grade English courses. Based on those, he was able to make some preliminary groupings. However, after administering his first assignment of the year, he noticed that several students are performing differently than he expected (some much lower, some much higher). Now he is confused about how to group students and set appropriately tiered targets. What guidance would you give him? How should he handle these sometimes-conflicting data sources?


    Planning for your school

    Planning for Your School

    ONLINE TOOLS

    Understanding SLOs

    Writing Objective Statements

    Using Baseline Data/Info

    Deepening Assessment Literacy

    Assessment Toolkit


    Planning for your school collegial planning

    Planning for Your School: Collegial Planning

    • What “A-ha’s” did you have during our work today?

    • What were some of your personal takeaways?

    10 min

    • What key messages did you prioritize for your teachers?

    • What resources do you plan to share with your teachers?

    • How do you plan to collaborate with your in-district peers?

    15 min

    • What advice do you have for your colleague?

    • Do you have any solutions or suggestions for adjusting their approach?

    25 min


    Workshop takeaways

    Workshop Takeaways

    • Prioritization is key

    Lightning Round: What is your #1 priority leaving this training?


    Closure and questions

    Closure and Questions

    Additional Resources

    • RIDE website: http://www.ride.ri.gov/

    • Evaluation email: [email protected]

      *RIDE staff members will respond to your context-specific questions.


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