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SOIL FERTILITY. INTRO TO SOILS CH 10. SOIL FERTILITY. Ability of soil to supply nutrients for plant growth Readily Available – soil solution Not Readily Available – mineral particles Important Concepts: - quantity of nutrients - protection from leaching - availability

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Soil fertility

SOIL FERTILITY

INTRO TO SOILS

CH 10


Soil fertility1
SOIL FERTILITY

Ability of soil to supply nutrients for plant growth

Readily Available – soil solution

Not Readily Available – mineral particles

Important Concepts:

- quantity of nutrients

- protection from leaching

- availability

- ease of root access


Soil fertility2
SOIL FERTILITY

Essential Elements* needed for plant growth

* 18 elements identified as essential for plants

- essential elements used in large amounts are called macronutrients

- essential elements used in smaller amounts are called micronutrients


Soil fertility3
SOIL FERTILITY

Three (3) nutrients are obtained from

air and water:

C, O, H

The other nutrients are obtained from the soil as ions

(see fig. 9-1) except Boron (H3BO3) as Boric Acid


Nutrient ions
NUTRIENT IONS

Ions are simply charged atoms or molecules . . .

Cations are positive (+)

Anions are negative (-)

Charges result from difference in number of protons and electrons


Plant roots absorb nutrient ions . . .

Soil particles adsorb nutrient ions


Sources of elements in soil
Sources of Elements in Soil

Four Sources: (fig. 10-4, p.159)

Soil Minerals

Organic Matter

Adsorbed Nutrients

Dissolved Ions



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