Gifted education in middle school rising 6 th grade students troup county schools may 2013
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Gifted Education in Middle School Rising 6 th Grade Students Troup County Schools May 2013. Purpose:. To explain State-approved models for providing gifted services to middle school students To explain how gifted students are assigned to classes

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Gifted Education in Middle School Rising 6 th Grade Students Troup County Schools May 2013

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Gifted education in middle school rising 6 th grade students troup county schools may 2013

Gifted Education in Middle School

Rising 6th Grade Students

Troup County Schools

May 2013


Purpose

Purpose:

  • To explain State-approved models for providing gifted services to middle school students

  • To explain how gifted students are assigned to classes

  • To explain the difference between elementary service models and middle school service models


State requirements

State Requirements

  • Identified gifted students must receive at least 1 segment per day (1 class) of gifted service or the yearly equivalent (In TCSS, gifted students may receive more than 1 class. The number of classes in which a student is placed is determined by a rubric score.)

  • Schools/Systems must provide services through a State-approved service model. In Troup County the most often used models are: Advanced Content, Cluster, Collaborative, & Resource.


Tcss goals

TCSS Goals

  • To provide equitable services to gifted students in all middle schools

  • To assign students to gifted level classes in a consistent manner throughout TCSS

  • To meet the standards outlined by the Georgia Department of Education in collaboration with the Georgia Association for Gifted Children


Resource model

Resource Model

  • Currently, resource (pull out) is the most commonly used model in TCSS elementary school.

  • Used only with identified gifted learners

  • Resource classes must have an academic content foundation based on Georgia Curriculum Standards but should focus on interdisciplinary enrichment activities.


Advanced content model

Advanced Content Model

  • Maximum class size of 21 (with waiver 25) at the secondary and 17 at elementary

  • Top 21 (25) students, whether identified gifted or not, according to rubric score

  • Taught by gifted-endorsed teacher


Cluster model

Cluster Model

  • Class Size of 28 (with waiver 32)

  • Gifted students assigned according to rubric score

  • No more than ½ the class can be gifted.

  • Remainder of the class comprised of heterogeneous group randomly assigned by computer

  • Taught by gifted-certified teacher

  • Contracts should be written for each gifted student.


Contracts

Contracts

Contracts should indicate:

  • a. Separate lesson plans that show reason(s) why the particular student(s) needs an advanced curriculum in the particular content area

  • b. A description of the course curriculum which is based on Georgia standards that shows how the content, pacing, teaching strategies, assessment is differentiated to meet the advanced needs of the students

  • c. Dates and amount of time (in segments) the student(s) will be engaged in the higher-level activities; and

  • d. Means by which the gifted student or student’s learning will be evaluated (e.g., formative and summative assessments)


Collaborative model change in state regulations effective 2013 2014 school year

Collaborative Model: Change in state regulations effective 2013-2014 school year

  • Maximum class size of 28 (with waiver 32)

  • No more than 8 gifted students, assigned by rubric

  • Remainder of the class comprised of heterogeneous group randomly assigned by computer.

  • Non-gifted endorsed teacher who collaborates weekly with a gifted-endorsed teacher


Advanced content in tcss middle schools

Advanced Content in TCSS Middle Schools

  • Advanced Content Classes (AC): At least 15%, but no more than 20%, of each grade level in Math and ELA

  • AC classes comprised of students, gifted or high-achieving, with highest rubric score in that subject


Ac example

AC Example

  • Grade level with 400 students

  • 15% of 400= 60

  • AC class maximum - 25

  • 3 AC classes in math and 3 AC classes in ELA

  • AC seats given to 75 students with highest score on subject rubric whether gifted or not


After 15 of advanced content

After 15% of Advanced Content…

  • TCSS middle schools will use a combination of cluster and/or collaborative service models to further meet the needs of their gifted student populations.


Cluster model1

Cluster Model

  • Number of cluster classes determined by number of gifted students and number of gifted-certified teachers ( school autonomy)

  • No more than 50% of class should be gifted students. Students assigned by rubric score in offered subject.

  • Remaining class will be comprised of students randomly assigned by computer


Collaborative model

Collaborative Model

  • Change in the state requirement. Effective 2013-2014 school year.

  • Number of offerings determined by number of gifted students and number of gifted-certified teachers (school autonomy)

  • No more than eight gifted students reported for state FTE. Assigned by descending scores on the rubric.

  • Remaining students are assigned randomly by the computer.


6 th grade math rubric

6th Grade Math Rubric


Advanced content model1

Advanced Content Model

  • Advanced Content Class: Offer Advanced Content (AC) classes in math depending on student’s strength(s) for the top 15 % of all students based on district rubric. Schools may consider the next tiered students, up to 20% if the class size is lower than the state required class size requirements for AC class. For example, if there are 480 6th graders in your school, the top 15% or 72 students can be placed in an AC class. Let us say, the class size is 25. The school can create 3 AC classes and will have a total of 75 students. The school will have the flexibility to place 3 more students in addition to the first 72; the next 3 students on the rubric after the initial 72.


Cluster model2

Cluster Model

  • Math Class for Gifted Students Who Are Not Eligible for AC Classes: Cluster Model

  • Cluster classes can be offered in math for gifted students who are not eligible for AC classes based explicitly on the scores on the district rubric. No more than 50% of the class should be gifted students. The remaining students should be a heterogeneous group comprised of mixed ability students assigned randomly by the computer. Cluster classes should meet the state’s required maximum class size rule. For example, if you have 32 students in a class, no more than 16 students can be counted as gifted for state reporting. The other section of the class should be randomly placed by computer.


Collaborative model change effective 2013 2014 school year

Collaborative Model- Change effective 2013-2014 school year

  • Math for Gifted Students Who Are Not Eligible for AC Classes: Collaborative Model

  • Collaborative classes can be offered in math for the gifted students who are not eligible for AC classes. Collaborative classes should have no more than 8 gifted students for state reporting. Other seats in the class are randomly assigned by the computer.


6 th grade ela rubric

6th Grade ELA Rubric


Science and social studies in tcss

Science and Social Studies in TCSS

  • Each middle school will provide at least one Advanced Content class in science and social studies per grade.

  • In addition to the Advanced Content class, schools will have autonomy to design additional offerings to meet student needs.


6 th grade science rubric

6th Grade Science Rubric


6 th grade social studies rubric

6th Grade Social Studies Rubric


Frequently asked questions

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is the state requirement for gifted classes?

The state requires that all gifted students must receive a minimum of one segment (1 class) of gifted service per day or a yearly equivalent. In TCSS, we strive to provide services over the state requirement.

2. What type of scheduling accommodations will be provided for gifted students?

Every effort shall be made to assign students to as many gifted-service model classes as appropriate by scoring the rubrics. However, gifted students may not be eligible to receive services through a gifted-service model class in all subject areas.

3. What do we do when an out-of-state student transfers to Georgia?

Use the CRCT-type achievement test that is administered in that state. For example, Alabama students take the ARM test in reading and math. If the student has no criterion-based test score, please contact the director of secondary curriculum or the Exceptional Education department.


Frequently asked questions1

Frequently Asked Questions

4. What do we do for rubric tiebreakers?

  • For tie breakers we will do the following:

  • 1st tiebreaker: Compare actual scores on the current year’s CRCT in the area that is being considered.

  • 2nd tiebreaker: Compare actual scores on the last year’s CRCT in the area that is being considered

  • 3rd tiebreaker: Compare actual scores on the previous year’s CRCT in the area that is being considered

  • Example: First tie-breaker for a rising 6th grader in 2013, look at the actual spring 2013 CRCT score. If the rubric scores continue to be tied, please compare scores from 2012, and if it still continues to be tied, compare scores from 2011 etc.

    5. What do we do when an out-of-state gifted student transfers to Georgia? Does the student automatically receive gifted services?

  • No; gifted services are not reciprocal. Eligibility must be established in Georgia before receiving gifted services in Georgia. However, transfer students will be given a rubric score and placed accordingly.


Frequently asked questions2

Frequently Asked Questions

6. What are the state requirements for teachers who serve gifted students through a cluster model?

  • Teachers should document curriculum modifications made for gifted students: (a) separate lesson plans (b) individual student contracts.

    7. What are the state requirements for teachers who serve gifted students through a collaborative model?

  • Teachers (gifted and general education) should document curriculum modifications made for gifted students: (a) separate lesson plans, (b) individual student contracts, and (c) time log of collaborative planning.

    8. How do you rank students using the rubric?

  • Score the rubric for all students. Rank them by order- 1, 2, 3, etc.

    9. How do you place students using the rubric?

  • Place students according to the rank they obtained on the rubric. Students cannot receive a separate rank based on their race, gender, or socio-economic status.


Questions

Questions

  • Please direct any questions to:

    • Karen R. Cagle (706) 812-7900

      [email protected]

    • Lakshmi Sankar (706) 812-7939 [email protected]


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