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Predicting and Connecting. Literacy Skill of the Month September 9, 11, 12 Presenters: Sue Messaglia Samantha Reda Location: Library 204B Location: Room 147 Extension: 2253 Extension: 2307. District Goal 1 CCS ELA 3, 4, 10. Examining Disciplinary Literacy in your Content Area.

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Predicting and connecting

Predicting and Connecting

Literacy Skill of the Month

September 9, 11, 12

Presenters:

Sue Messaglia Samantha Reda

Location: Library 204B Location: Room 147

Extension: 2253 Extension: 2307

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10


Examining disciplinary literacy in your content area
Examining Disciplinary Literacy in your Content Area

Degree of Importance

High Moderate Limited

Frequency of Use

High Moderate Limited

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10

  • How familiar are you with the Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading?

  • Are the strategies of predicting and connecting used in your Content Area?

    • What do they look like?

    • How do they apply to your discipline?


Goals
Goals

  • Ultimate Goal for My Students (one sentence)

    Think for themselves

    Independent problem solvers

    • Think critically and come up with more than one solution to a problem.

    • Be a successful, productive citizen!

    • Good Choices and live long healthy lives

  • Ultimate Goal

    • Empower students to become college and career ready!

    • Empower Faculty with CORE strategies

    • Familiarity with ELA Anchor Standards for Reading

    • Assist teachers in making a clear connection between formative assessment data (MAP and Explore, PLAN and ACT) and planning for instruction and assessment.

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10


College career readiness anchor standards for reading
College & Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10

Key Ideas and Details:

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical

inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

Craft and Structure:

4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.1

8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity:

10. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.


R ccr 1
R.CCR.1

  • In Other Words:

  • Read the text

  • Explain what the text says

  • Explain what you can reasonably guess is true based on what’s in the text

  • Point out the parts of the text that make those guesses “reasonable,” as opposed to “wild.”

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.


R ccr 2
R.CCR.2

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

--In Other Words:

Determine the theme of the text.

Analyze how the theme is developed.

Summarize the supporting details.


R ccr 3
R.CCR.3

  • --In Other Words:

  • The ability to ask, “And then what happened?”

  • The ability to explain, with each answer, how what’s happening “now” is related to what happened “then.”

  • Without this ability, texts make no sense; they’re just a bunch of words jumbled up on paper.

Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of the text.


R ccr 4
R.CCR.4

  • --In Other Words:

  • Figuring out the function of words within a text.

  • This includes understanding that words are not always used in a single, literal way.

  • How the choice of a specific word affects the meaning of a passage or its tone.

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.


R ccr 4 analyzing the author s specific word choice
R.CCR.4Analyzing the Author’s Specific Word Choice

Everyone interprets and expresses things differently so analyzing an author’s specific word choice is important in understanding the author’s intended meaning or tone.

Students have to interpret words and phrases at both a literal and a connotative or figurative level.

A word or phrase can change the entire meaning of a text.


R.CCR.4

Connotative Vs. Denotative

Denotative or Literal-Think dictionary

Connotative or Suggest-Think beyond the literal meaning. For example, enraged, furious, livid, wrathful, and irate all basically share the same denotative meaning—angry. Wrathful carries associations of an all-consuming God-like anger, while irate implies intense frustration.

Authors word choices give us clues for interpreting the texts meaning and tone.


R ccr 4 tone and meaning
R.CCR.4Tone and Meaning

The author’s choice of words can thus imply a sense of expression that is humorous, serious, instructive, and so on.

Word choices can also reveal possible biases the author may hold toward the subject.

If students can analyze the word choice in order to access the author’s attitude, they are better equipped to decode the author’s tone and intended meaning and will be able to critique the text within its rhetorical context.


R ccr 5
R.CCR.5

Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text relate to each other and the whole.

--In Other Words:

The relationships among the parts of a text like the chapters and sections and between the whole text often play a role in the meaning of the text as a whole.

The ability to analyze a text’s structure provides information about the type of text it is and where to find certain information, like the solution to a mystery.


R ccr 6
R.CCR.6

Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

--In Other Words:

The point of view from which a text is told & its purpose both affect the content and style of a text.

Point of view & purpose shape choices like what is told, what is left out, & what order events unfold.

Understanding point of view & purpose helps readers reveal bias in a text & predict what information is missing.


R ccr 7
R.CCR.7

Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

--In Other Words:

Pay attention to drawings, graphs, tables, and other forms of media in a text.


R ccr 8
R.CCR.8

Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

--In Other Words:

Explain the argument presented

Point out the points

Decide if the logic is legitimate

Evaluate whether the proof can pass for the individual claims and the argument as a whole.


R ccr 9
R.CCR.9

Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

--In Other Words:

Students need to be able to compare and contrast texts on the same subject.


R ccr 10
R.CCR.10

--In Other Words:

Read a variety of texts and understand them, even if the text is tedious or difficult.

No prior experience with the information in the text should be needed.

Students must be able to understand different texts independently.

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.


Predicting and connecting1
Predicting and Connecting

Research based strategies that foster student independence- Reading for meaning, compare & contrast, Inductive & multiple document learning, circle of knowledge, provisional writing, vocabulary (From The Core Six)

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10

“In general, the conscious processing that is excellent reading begins before reading, continues during reading, and persists after reading is completed” (p.57).

Michael Pressley (2006)


Predicting
Predicting

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10

Previewing text

  • Organization- Going over the framework/structure of the materials students will be using. Textbooks, websites, journals, articles, webisodes, vodcasts

  • Activating prior knowledge and starting the connection process


Predicting1
Predicting

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10

Creating & monitoring predictions

A step in making logical inferences (R.CCR.1)

Generating Pre-reading questions, statements \ revisiting these statements throughout the unit Focusing in on the topics, helps eliminate extraneous information

Using evidence to support, revise, abandon predictions

https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/pre-reading-strategies


Connecting
Connecting

District Goal 1

CCS ELA 3, 4, 10

Making basic & multilevel Connections

(text to text, self, world)

Necessary step in analysis

Vocabulary- Root words, Sounds like, looks like

Context clues- figurative language

Making Connections activities


References
References

Pressley, M. (2006). Reading instruction that works: The case for balanced teaching (3rd ed.). New York: The Guilford Press.


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