wenstrom bible ministries marion iowa pastor teacher bill wenstrom www wenstrom org
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Wenstrom Bible Ministries Marion, Iowa Pastor-Teacher Bill Wenstrom wenstrom

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 45

Wenstrom Bible Ministries Marion, Iowa Pastor-Teacher Bill Wenstrom wenstrom - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 173 Views
  • Uploaded on

Wenstrom Bible Ministries Marion, Iowa Pastor-Teacher Bill Wenstrom www.wenstrom.org. Thursday December 2, 2010 Jonah: Jonah 4:4-The Lord Responds To Jonah’s Anger With A Rhetorical Question That Rebukes The Prophet’s Attitude Lesson # 52. Please turn in your Bibles to Jonah 4:1.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Wenstrom Bible Ministries Marion, Iowa Pastor-Teacher Bill Wenstrom wenstrom' - fawzi


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide2

Thursday December 2, 2010Jonah: Jonah 4:4-The Lord Responds To Jonah’s Anger With A Rhetorical Question That Rebukes The Prophet’s AttitudeLesson # 52

slide4

By way of review, Jonah 4:1 records that Jonah thought it was an unjust decision by God, in fact, a great injustice, which made him furious that the Lord did not destroy Nineveh because the Ninevites believed in Him and repented from their evil way of living.

slide6
This verse presents the contrast between Jonah’s angry reaction with what should have been his reaction, namely, joy and thanksgiving.
slide9

Jonah 4:2 reveals for the first time Jonah’s motivation for disobeying the Lord’s command to go to Nineveh and announce judgment against its inhabitants.

slide10

Jonah 4:2, “He prayed to the Lord and said, ‘Please Lord, was not this what I said while I was still in my own country? Therefore in order to forestall this I fled to Tarshish, for I knew that You are a gracious and compassionate God, slow to anger and abundant in lovingkindness, and one who relents concerning calamity.’” (NASU)

slide11
In Jonah 4:3, the prophet complains to the Lord in prayer that he’d rather die than live and see Him spare the lives of the Ninevites.
jonah 4 3 therefore now o lord please take my life from me for death is better to me than life nasu
Jonah 4:3, “Therefore now, O Lord, please take my life from me, for death is better to me than life.” (NASU)
slide14

The first scene appeared in 1:1-3, the second in 1:4-16, the third in 1:17-2:10, the fourth in Jonah 3:1-3a, the fifth in 3:3b-10, the sixth in 4:1-4 and the seventh and final scene in 4:5-11.

slide17
Verse 4 is an adversative clause that contains a rhetorical question that demands a negative response from Jonah.
slide18

In Jonah 4:2-3, the prophet expresses his anger and frustration with the Lord’s decision to spare the Ninevites because they exercised faith in Him and repented from their evil way of living.

slide19

In Jonah 4:4, the Lord responds by posing to him a rhetorical question, which implies that He was justified to render such a decision since it was consistent with His character and nature, which Jonah himself acknowledges in verse 2!

slide22
Therefore, the contrast is between God’s perspective and Jonah’s perspective with regards to the Ninevites.
slide23

“Do you have good reason to be angry?” is composed of the interrogative particle hǎ(הֲ־) (ha), “do,” which is prefixed to the hiphil active infinitive absolute form of the verb yā∙ṭǎḇ (יָטַב) (ya-tobe), “good reason” and the third person masculine singular qal active perfect form of the verb ḥā∙rā(h) (חָרָה) (khaw-raw), “to be angry” and the preposition le (לְ) (lamed), “you” and the second person masculine singular form of the pronomial suffix ʾǎt∙tā(h) (אַתָּה) (aw-thaw), “you.”

slide24

The interrogative particle hǎ, “do” is prefixed to the hiphil active infinitive absolute form of the verb yā∙ṭǎḇ, “good reason” to form a rhetorical question that demands a negative answer.

slide25

The verb yā∙ṭǎḇ means “to be justified” since the Lord is questioning as to whether or not Jonah’s attitude is right with regards to His decision to exercise His grace policy towards the Ninevites and spare their lives.

slide26

The verb ḥā∙rā(h) means “to be infuriated” and is used of Jonah’s great anger or rage with respect to God’s decision to spare the lives of the Ninevites.

slide27

The rhetorical question that the Lord poses to Jonah implies that the Lord was right to extend grace to the Ninevites when they turned to Him in faith and consequently repented from their evil way of living since this decision was consistent with His character and nature and grace policy towards the entire human race.

slide28

Thus, the question in a gentle manner, rebukes the prophet’s bad attitude towards the Lord’s decision to spare the lives of the Ninevites when they believed in Him and repented from their evil way of living.

slide29
The Lord’s question is designed to get Jonah to come around to His point of view regarding the Ninevites.
slide30

He doesn’t condemn Jonah but through this question is actually inviting Jonah to condemn himself and admit he is wrong about his negative attitude towards His decision to spare the Ninevites.

slide31

Notice that the Lord does not even reply to Jonah’s request to die since this was utterly ridiculous and was simply the prophet expressing his frustration with the Lord’s decision to extend grace and forgiveness to the Ninevites.

slide32

Jonah is inconsistent with regards to his understanding of the character and nature of God with respect to the entire human race and specifically the Ninevites.

slide33

The fact that Jonah never replies as well his conduct later on in the scene indicates that the prophet is still infuriated and thus implacable.

slide34
The Lord is being patient and tolerant with Jonah as well as magnanimous with him, which are all expressions of His great love.
slide35
God’s love is “tolerant” meaning that the Lord put up with or endures with Jonah whose opinion differs from His own (Eph. 4:2).
slide36

His love is also “impersonal” meaning that God can love from His own divine nature sinners who are obnoxious and unattractive to Him, which Jonah is at this point in the narrative.

slide37

God’s love with respect to Jonah up to this point in the narrative is “unconditional” meaning that no matter what sin Jonah commits or how unfaithful he is or how rebellious, God never ever disowns him (Rm. 8:35, 39).

slide38

God’s love is “compassionate” meaning that God intensely desires and will act to alleviate the pain and suffering of another or remove its cause (1 John 3:16-17).

slide39

He is attempting to alleviate Jonah’s own self induced misery that is the result of his unjustifiable attitude towards His decision to spare the Ninevites.

slide40

God’s love is “’magnanimous” towards Jonah meaning that the Lord is being generous in forgiving Jonah insulting Him by being angry with respect to His decision to spare the Ninevites.

slide41
The Lord is not vindictive toward Jonah for being angry about His decision to extend grace to the Ninevites.
the lord is generous tolerant patient moderate courageous and noble when dealing with angry jonah
The Lord is generous, tolerant, patient, moderate, courageous, and noble when dealing with angry Jonah.
slide44

The Lord is patient with Jonah in the sense that He will endure Jonah’s attempt to provoke Him and annoy Him without complaint and will not exercise His righteous indignation towards the prophet.

ad