Tina Doe

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Tina Doe

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1. Tina Doe Learning: Current Research and its Impacts on Teaching

3. This Session What the research says about learning How these new understandings are redefining approaches to teaching and learning Introduce the notion of Learning Design Implication for preparing teachers

5. Who Am I? As a Person Add this at the end again to say how I plan to build a picture of them as people on staff with their own backgrounds and expertise An Arts educator I believe firmly that a picture tells a thousand words so here’s 41 years in one shot. Wife, mother of 2, Peregian Beach resident for 17 years, traveller with a love of life. Add this at the end again to say how I plan to build a picture of them as people on staff with their own backgrounds and expertise An Arts educator I believe firmly that a picture tells a thousand words so here’s 41 years in one shot. Wife, mother of 2, Peregian Beach resident for 17 years, traveller with a love of life.

6. Who Am I? As a Professional in the Education Industry Qualifications Diploma of Teaching Secondary Arts/Humanities Graduate Diploma in Applied Linguistics Masters Learning Management Teacher with 20 years experience Learning Contexts: Primary, Secondary, TAFE, migrant, Adult Education and University Management Roles: Deputy Principal SBSHS Arts/LOTE HOD SBSHS

7. = Attitudes and Perceptions Take time to develop rapport Dispel myths/misconceptions Check perceptions and values Establish safe risk-taking Find areas of commonality Form networks and partnerships Test hypotheses/standpoints

8. References OECD (2002). Understanding the Brain: Towards a New Learning Science. Paris: OECD Publications Marzano, R. J., Gaddy, B. B., & Dean, C. (2000). What Works in Classroom Instruction. Aurora, CO: McREL. Smith, R. and Lynch, D. (2006), “The Learning Design Process”, in The Rise of the Learning Manager, Pearson, French’s Forest, NSW Lynch, D. (1998), “The Learning Design Process”, cited in Smith, R. and Lynch, D. (2006), The Rise of the Learning Manager, Pearson, French’s Forest, NSW, p. 62

9. What the Research says about Learning The greatest impact to the work of teachers is coming from a greater understanding about the brain and its functions The research I present is a summary of key points and is a subset of a very complex set of research findings.

10. How smart is the brain? Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer In waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is that the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it wouth it bnieg a porbelm.Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

11. So, what is learning? Schema – behaviour pattern and in education refers to the current organisation of ones mind/ thinkings Biological standpoint we grow new synapses (or new neural connections in the brain) Learning is the process by which one’s schema is altered/ modified or added to so that resulting cognitive processes are constituted differently Therefore we acquire a change in schematic makeup when we learn (not always permanent)

12. Let’s see if we can prove the notion of a schema and its influence on your brain’s function The questions that p________ face as they raise ch________ from in_________ to adult are not easy to an_________. Both f______ and m________ can become concerned when health problems such as co_________ arise anytime after the e____ stage to later life. Experts recommend that young ch____ should have plenty of s________ and nutritious food for healthy growth. B___ and g____ should not share the same b______ or even be in the same r______. They may be afraid of the d_____.

13. See how you were relying on your education schematic framework to work this task! The questions that poultry-men face as they raise chickens from incubators to adult are not easy to answer. Both farmers and merchants can become concerned when health problems such as coccidiosis arise anytime after the egg stage to later life. Experts recommend that young chicks should have plenty of sunshine and nutritious food for healthy growth. Bantees and geese should not share the same barnyard or even be in the same roost. They may be afraid of the dark.

14. What the research says about learning “Education today is a pre-scientific discipline, reliant upon psychology, philosophy,sociology etc. for its theoretical foundation. Cognitive neuroscience is offering a sounder basis for the understanding of learning and the practice of teaching”. (OECD, 2002, p.10)

15. What the Research says about Learning: some background Knowledge Economy is underpinned by learning: --a central component-and there is much money being ploughed into understanding it by many sectors. Most notably outside education The emergence of this new economy– one built on knowledge-- has spawned greater understandings about learning This contrasts with the industrial era where fields such as education had to rely on other fields, such as sociology and psychology, for professional underpinnings The challenge has always been to make the stuff fit with the core business of teachers: teaching and learning

16. What the Research says about Learning Advances in medical technologies have boosted our understandings about how the brain functions We now have compendiums of educational research which details direct strategies for teachers to enhance the learning of all learners. The meshing of these bodies of research is defining specifically the what, why, where, when and how of teaching practice.

17. Key Research Findings There are ‘sensitive’ or optimum periods for learning Age reference points for acquiring certain knowledges We have predispositions to certain types of learning There are fundamentally two types of knowledge– declarative and procedural knowledge– and these require differential approaches Learning is hierarchical in that certain knowledge precedes others Learning occurs when schematic frameworks (growth of synapses) are established in the brain that connect previous learnings to new and to differing situations

18. The Faculty knowledge-base

19. Problems with research into learning Communication problems exist between the cognitive neuroscientists conducting such research and the education practitioners who would deliver its findings The research is developing faster than educators can be in-serviced Learning science is still in its infancy- meaning there is still much to uncover Current theoretical underpinnings for preparing teachers are at odds with the research evidence Means a fundamental shift in teacher practice and the notion of how education is organised at all levels in the economy

20. So what does this mean for preparing teachers The work of teachers is about learning Science of learning is providing new professional foundations and A set of professional strategies that enables teaching to work for all learners Learning Design

21. LEARNING DESIGN Putting the research into action for teachers

22. Learning Design and Teacher Preparation In the following sections I want to illustrate how the research into learning can be brought to bear on preparing teachers: to detail a learning design process that Provides a schematic learning framework for the student teacher, Organises the knowledge elements of a teacher education course And also provides the student teacher with strategies to be an effective teacher In effect, a ‘how to’ recipe for organising the knowledge required for successful teaching graduates.

23. Learning Design Is a process that focuses the teacher to the learner’s profile and to teaching strategies that build on current understandings about learning Contrasts with Curriculum Planning which focuses the teacher to predetermined content and to age related learning cohorts. The strategies are then left to the teacher’s creative endeavours. Learning Design = student learning needs + research based strategies= enhanced student learning outcomes

24. Learning Design Lynch (1998) developed a Learning Design process built on the notion of ‘schematic framework building’ The process is known as the 8 Learning Management Questions The process organises for the student teacher the key elements required for successful teaching and learning The teacher preparation program then packages/ arranges its units of study so they inform each question (the required elements of the student’s teacher’s learning)

25. We are all very familiar with these questions and the three phases of the learning management plan by now. Today you are going to reflect upon these same questions, but this time you will be the learner in question and the learning journey being considered is yours as a student of the BLM.We are all very familiar with these questions and the three phases of the learning management plan by now. Today you are going to reflect upon these same questions, but this time you will be the learner in question and the learning journey being considered is yours as a student of the BLM.

26. Learning Design The 8 LMQs provide for the development of a schematic framework to organise and develop a series of learning considerations What’s needed then is a series of evidence based practices that provide the student teacher with actual strategies to implement the design learning program

28. The Dimensions of Learning

29. Summary Research is providing us with evidence-based approaches to teaching and learning These need to be applied to the organisational elements of how we prepare teachers

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