Teacher value added model
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Teacher Value Added Model. St. Johns County School District March 23, 2012. Gains vs. Growth. Part 1. Calculating Learning Gains. For the school to earn a Learning Gain Point. (School Learning Gain Points = % of students making a Learning Gain)

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Teacher value added model

Teacher Value Added Model

St. Johns County School District

March 23, 2012


Gains vs growth

Gains vs. Growth

Part 1


Calculating learning gains

Calculating Learning Gains

  • For the school to earn a Learning Gain Point.

    (School Learning Gain Points = % of students making a Learning Gain)

  • Level 1 and Level 2 students must earn the designated amount of Developmental Scale Score points from the previous year based on the FCAT to earn a Learning Gain point.

  • Level 3, 4 and 5 students do nothave to earn the designated amount of Developmental Scale Score points from the previous year to earn a Learning Gain point as long as they stay in their current proficiency level or gain a level.


Teacher value added model

What is a value added measure?

  • The value added measure focuses on whether or not every student met, exceeded, or fell short of the projected growth prediction the state calculates for each student.

  • The value added model does not rely on proficiency; it relies on calculating an expected growth value for each student based on various factors and then determining, based on test scores, whether or not the student met the projected growth.


Teacher value added model

What factors help shape the growth prediction for each student?

The vast majority of the growth prediction comes from the students’ own previous test scores. One score can be used but when available, 2 previous scores are used. The most recent score carries the most weight in the prediction.

  • Additional Variables:

    • Number of subject relevant courses (English and Intensive Reading)

    • ESE status (Primary and secondary disabilities are considered)

    • ELL status (Less than two years in the ESOL program)

    • Gifted status

    • Mobility – Number of times a student switches schools during the school year.

    • Attendance - Also includes days missed due to suspension.

      • Higher absences = lower growth expectation.

  • Age - Is the student much older than grade level peers. (Captures retentions)

  • Class size - Not really applicable due to class size amendment.

    • (Impact of Associate Teachers)

  • Homogeneity of prior test scores – Takes into account the mix of students and the different levels of proficiency that have been assigned to the teacher’s class.


  • What factors are not included in the growth prediction for each student

    What factors are not included in the growth prediction for each student?

    • Variables not addressed (prohibited by law)

      • Gender,

      • race or

      • socioeconomic status (free/ reduced lunch)

    • The state can’t provide a growth prediction at the beginning of the year because attendance and mobility are not known until the end of the year.


    Teacher value added model

    The difference between the expected growth and the actual growth is what makes up the bulk of the value added score.

    +30 = Student …….. Outcome

    …….. (residual)

    -10 = Student …….. Outcome

    …….. (residual)


    Teacher value added model

    Example Scenario

    • Student A

    • Has grown a large number of Developmental Scale Score points (DSS) each of the last 2 FCAT administrations

    • Student has perfect attendance

    • Student has been at the same school all year

    • Student B

    • Has had minimal growth in Developmental Scale Score points (DSS) each of the last 2 FCAT administrations

    • Student has missed 25 days of school this year

    • Student has attended 3 different schools this year because his family has had to move multiple times.

    Biggest

    Indicator

    Growth expectation would be lower

    Growth expectation would be higher


    Teacher value added model

    Can a student be proficient but not meet projected growth? Yes

    Both students enter the year as FCAT level 4 and leave the year at level 4.

    +5

    -10


    Other important information

    Other important information

    • Cell size - The current system is that you need to have at least 30 scores over a 3 year period in order to receive your own score. (not finalized)

    • Students who move or enter during the year - If you delivered instruction to the student during survey 2 or survey 3, you will receive their score. If a student is with you during survey 2 and then moves, their score is duplicated. This means that each teacher (school A and school B) receives the student’s full score.

      * Value Added scores are expected to arrive the end of July.


    Other important information1

    Other important information

    • ESE students - In general, the scores for ESE students are broken in two. HR teacher gets half of the score, ESE teacher gets half.

    • Alternate assessment students - Currently, the scores of alternate assessment students do not count towards the teacher value added score.

      For elementary, 4th and 5th grade teachers and the ESE teachers who support them will get their own scores (if 3 year total number of scores is above 30 for each teacher). All others will receive the school average.


    Calculating the value added score

    Calculating the Value Added Score

    Part 2


    How does the state calculate my teacher value added score tch vas

    How does the state calculate my teacher value added score (Tchvas)?

    • There are several “ingredients” that are used in the calculation of the teacher value added score. The ingredients are put into various formulas in order to determine the value added score.

    • The ingredients are:

      • Average student outcomes (Stdoutcomes)

      • School Component (Schcomponent)

      • Teacher Componet (Tchcomponent)


    The formula for tch vas is

    The formula for Tchvasis:

    • Tchvas= (Tchcomponent) + .5 x (Schcomponent)

  • In other words, the teacher value added score (Tchvas) is the teacher component plus one half of the school component. Sounds simple, right?

  • First we will go over each ingredient and then we will mix them all together.


  • Tch vas tch component 5 x sch component

    Tchvas= (Tchcomponent) + .5 x (Schcomponent)

    • Now that we know that the teacher value added score is equal to the teacher component plus one half of the school component, we have a few more questions to answer.

      • How does the state calculate the average student outcomes (Stdoutcomes) needed in order to calculate the teacher component?

      • How does the state calculate the (Schcomponent)?

      • How does the state calculate the (Tchcomponent)?


    Ingredient 1 how does the state calculate the average student outcomes

    Ingredient # 1How does the state calculate the average student outcomes?

    • Before we look at the average student outcome, we’ll look at how a single student outcome is calculated. A student outcome is the difference between the Student’s Projected Growth and the actual growth.

    • Example:

      • Student projected growth is 100 developmental scale points.

      • Student actual growth was 110 developmental scale points.

      • Student outcome is the difference = +10.


    Ingredient 1 student outcome std outcome

    Ingredient # 1Student Outcome(Stdoutcome)

    • Zero is the state average/baseline for the growth model.

      • A positive number means the student exceeded the projected growth while a negative number means the student did not meet the expected projected growth.


    Ingredient 1 how does the state calculate the average student outcomes1

    Ingredient # 1How does the state calculate the average student outcomes?

    • The average student outcomes (Stdoutcomes) is calculated using a two step process.

    • First, the projected growth is compared to the actual growth for each student.

    • The differences between the scores are then averaged to arrive at the student outcomes.


    Ingredient 1 example

    Ingredient # 1 example

    NameProjected growthActual growthDifference(residual)

    Robert 100 pts. 110 pts. +10Sam 65 pts. 80 pts. +15Jane 110 pts. 115 pts. +5 Average = +10

    • Average (Stdoutcomes) = 10

  • 10+15+5 divided by 3 (number of students in class).


  • Ingredient 2 how does the state come up with the school component

    Ingredient # 2How does the state come up with the school component?

    • The school component (Schcomponent) is calculated the same way as the average student outcomes (Stdoutcomes) except for one key difference.

    • In the average student outcomes, just the students for that specific teacher are used.

    • For the school component, all of the value added eligible students in the school are used.


    Ingredient 2 example

    Ingredient # 2example

    Student 1 +10

    Student 2 +5

    Student 3 +10

    Student 4 +18

    Student 5 +2

    Student 6 +3

    48 / 6 = 8

    • (Schcomponent) = 8

    • 10+5+10+18+2+3 divided by 6 (number of students in the school)


    Ingredient 2 school component sch component

    Ingredient # 2School Component (Schcomponent)

    • Sum of all residual points earned by the students in the school divided by the total number of students.

    • 240total residual points divided by the 30students in the school equals a school component of8

      240/30 = 8


    Ingredient 3 teacher component

    Ingredient # 3Teacher Component

    Ingredient # 1Ingredient # 2

    (Tchcomponent) = (Stdoutcomes) - (Schcomponent)

    Example from previous slides:

    • (Tchcomponent) = 10 (from example) – 8 (from example)

    • (Tchcomponent) = 2


    How does the state calculate my value added score

    How does the state calculate my value added score?

    • We now mix the 3 ingredients.

      • Average student outcome (Stdoutcomes)

        • used in (Tchcomponent)

  • School Component (Schcomponent) = 8

  • Teacher Component (Tchcomponent) = 2

  • Formula

    Tchvas= (Tchcomponent) + .5 x (Schcomponent)

    Tchvas= 2 + (.5 x 8)

    Tchvas= 6


  • Teacher value added model

    Please note that the Teacher value added score (Tchvas)

    is provided by the state.

    The calculations just discussed are not done at the district level.


    Teacher concordant score

    Teacher Concordant Score

    Part 3


    Teacher value added model

    How do we verify that the Tchvas accurately represents the true Value Added for the teacher?----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------We verify by using a Standard Error (SE) and a K value.

    • Standard Error (SE) – is used to construct confidence intervals around the Teacher Value Added Score (Tchvas).

      • (Strongly influenced by the number of Students)

  • K value – degree of certainty to better ensure the accurate classification of the Teacher Value Added Score (Tchvas).

    • SJCSD is using .5K for this additional element of certainty.

  • This additional step is used to classify teachers into the effectiveness scale.

  • (Tchvas) +/- [(.5K) x SE)] = Final Teacher Value Added Score (FTchvas)

  • (Tchvas) +/- [(.5K) x SE)] = (FTchvas)


    Teacher value added score tch vas

    Teacher Value Added Score (Tchvas)

    • The Teacher Value Added Score (Tchvas) is sorted from highest to lowest score - this is provided by the state.

  • All teachers at or above zero are placed in one cohort (A).

  • All teachers below are placed in another cohort (B).

  • Zero is considered the state average.

  • To ensure the reliability of the teacher value added score each teacher score is then multiplied by the Standard Error (SE) and a K value of .5 – the SE is provided by the state, the calculation is made by the district.


  • How do we convert what we receive from the state into a marzano friendly score 1 4 scale

    How do we convert what we receive from the state into a Marzano friendly score (1 – 4 scale)?

    • The results from sorting (Tchvas) will create positive and negative values:

      • the A cohort is above zero

      • the B cohort is below zero.

    • Applying the formula:

      • (Tchvas) +/- [(.5K) x SE)] = (FTchvas)

      • will create (+ +, + -, - +, - -) categories that differentiate between performance levels.


    Final teacher vas ftch vas example

    Final Teacher VAS (FTchvas) example

    A++

    A+

    A+-

    B-+

    B-

    B--


    Teacher concordant score1

    Teacher Concordant Score

    • To calculate the Teacher Concordant Score

      • In our sample A ++has a range of 0 to 9. There are 6 pts. for the range (3.5 to 4.0). Divide 9 by 6 which equals a 1.5 range between each level.

        Example for A++Range:


    Teacher concordant score with weighted percent of students meeting projected growth

    Teacher Concordant Score with Weighted Percent of Students Meeting Projected Growth

    * Regardless of weighted Concordant Score the highest possible is a 4.0


    Final summative

    Final Summative

    • Teacher with specific FCAT student results with 3 or more years of data.

      • 50% of overall summative will be based on all 3 years data the (FTchvas)

      • 50% Marzano Observable Elements

    • Teacher with specific FCAT student results with less than 3 years of data.

      • 40% of overall summative will be based on the data available (FTchvas)

      • 60% Marzano Observable Elements

    • School personnel who are not assigned to specific FCAT student results and 3rd grade FCAT Teachers.

      • 50% of overall summative will be based on the (Schcomponent).

      • 50% Marzano Observable Elements


    Final summative score

    Final Summative Score

    • Observable Elements (50%) + the Weighted Value Added Student Growth (50%) = Final Summative Score

    • Marzano Rating Scale

      Highly Effective Effective Needs Improvement/Developing Unsatisfactory

      3.5 – 4.0 2.5 – 3.4 1.5 – 2.4 1.0 – 1.4

    • Example:

      • Observable Elements (Marzano) 2.3

      • Weighted Teacher Value Added Score+ 3.3

      • Total 5.6 / 2

  • Final Summative Score2.8 = Effective


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