Physics of sound
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Physics of Sound. Investigation 1: Dropping In Part 3 Sound and Vibrations. Objectives. I can identify a sound source . I can identify a sound receiver . I can describe , orally and in writing, what happens to vibrations when volume changes . Sound and Vibrations.

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Physics of Sound

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Physics of sound

Physics of Sound

Investigation 1: Dropping In

Part 3

Sound and Vibrations


Objectives

Objectives

  • I can identify a sound source.

  • I can identify a sound receiver.

  • I can describe, orally and in writing, what happens to vibrations when volume changes.


Sound and vibrations

Sound and Vibrations

  • We will be exploring sounds made by two different objects. Watch how to use each object appropriately.

    • Long gong

    • Tuning fork

  • Treat the instruments with care.

  • If you hit them too hard, they may break.


Tuning fork and long gong

Tuning Fork and Long Gong

  • You will get time to get to know the instruments, then you will use them for an investigation.

    • 5 minutes to explore

    • Repackage instrument

    • Switch with another group

  • GETTERs get materials.

  • STARTERs watch the clock and make sure everyone gets a turn.


Share observations

Share Observations

  • Return all materials to the bags.

  • Think-Pair-Share

    • What did you hear?

    • What were the properties of the sounds you heard?

    • What did you see when the two instruments made sounds?


Door fiddle

Door Fiddle

  • Guess what the teacher is making.

  • What do you see?

  • What do you hear?

  • How does the string feel when it is making its sound?


Tone generator

Tone Generator

  • Watch the beans!

  • What do you see?

  • What do you hear?

  • How does the speaker feel when it is making its sound?


Tone generator1

Tone Generator

  • The quick back-and-forth movement of the string and speaker cone that you observed is called a VIBRATION.

  • Sometimes vibrations are so fast that they are easier to feel than they are to see.

  • Some vibrations feel like a tickle or a buzz.

  • Where have you felt vibrations? What did you hear when you felt the vibration?


Investigate

Investigate

  • We will use the long gongs and tuning forks to do detailed investigations.

  • This time you should look for vibrations when the turning fork and the long gong are making their sounds.


Student sheets

Student Sheets

  • Open your yellow Physics of Sound packet to “The Tuning Fork” and “The Long Gong.”

  • Look at the headings. You will be expected to record information on these sheets while you investigate.

  • READ THE INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY.

    • Underline key words!


Miniactivities

MiniActivities

  • STARTERs read the instructions aloud to the group.

  • After that, GETTERs get the materials.

  • When you are done with one activity, have a teacher check your sheet. They will let you know if you can move on to the next activity.


Think about

Think About

  • What causes sound?

  • What is vibrating when you hear the sounds?

  • T-P-S

  • Return materials.


The source

The Source

  • Close your eyes. Be VERY quiet. Listen carefully to the sounds all around you for the next minute or so.

  • Raise your hand and identify a sound you heard.

  • Sound comes from a source. A sound source is where a vibration starts. Usually a sound source is a vibrating object, like a wire arch, a tuning fork, or a speaker cone.


The receiver

The Receiver

  • In order for a sound source to be heard, is must be detected (found) by a sound receiver. A sound receiver is something that responds to vibrations generated by a sound source.

  • Our ears are our sound receivers.

  • What other sound receivers can you think of?


Volume

Volume

  • Demonstration: work with volume dial on tone generator, keeping the pitch the same.

    • What is the sound source?

    • What is the sound receiver?

    • How is the sound changing?

    • What happens to the vibrations when the sound is louder or softer?


Volume1

Volume

  • Volume describes how loud a sound is.

  • STRONG vibrations make LOUD sounds.

  • Weak vibrations make soft sounds.

  • Volume is measured in decibels, named for Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone.


Volume2

Volume

  • Explore volume with the door fiddle, tone generator, tuning fork, and long gong.

  • Identify the sound sourcesand receivers.

  • How intense (strong or weak) is the vibration while the sound is being made?


Objectives1

Objectives

  • I can identify a sound source.

  • I can identify a sound receiver.

  • I can describe, orally and in writing, what happens to vibrations when volume changes.


Review reflect

Review/Reflect

  • What do vibrationshave to do with sound?

  • What are some examples of sound sources?

  • What are some examples of sound receivers?

  • What happens to the vibrations when the volume changes?


Sound

sound


Vibration

vibration


Source

source


Receiver

receiver


Volume3

volume


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