MDG 7: Environmental Sustainability Water and Sanitation

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UNITED NATIONS MILLENNIUM DECLARATION. 19. We resolve further: To halve, by the year 2015, the proportion of people who are unable to reach or to afford safe drinking water By 2020, to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers as proposed i
MDG 7: Environmental Sustainability Water and Sanitation

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1. MDG 7: Environmental Sustainability (Water and Sanitation) Eduardo P. Banzon, MD, MSc Senior Health Specialist, World Bank

2. UNITED NATIONS MILLENNIUM DECLARATION 19. We resolve further: To halve, by the year 2015, ?the proportion of people who are unable to reach or to afford safe drinking water By 2020, to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers as proposed in the "Cities Without Slums" initiative 8th plenary meeting 8 September 2000

3. MDG 7 (ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY) Target 10 Halve by 2015 the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking-water (and sanitation) Target 11 By 2020 to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers

4. MDG 7 (ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY) INDICATOR 30 Proportion of population with sustainable access to an improved water source, urban and rural INDICATOR 31 Proportion of population with access to improved sanitation, urban and rural

5. MDG 7 (ENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY) INDICATOR 30 (improved water source) 1990 (73.0%) 2004 (80.2%) 2015 target (86.5%) INDICATOR 31 (improved sanitation) 1990 (67.6%) 2004 (86.2%) 2015 target (83.8%)

6. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Program

9. WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Program

11. The large improvements in sanitation and water supply and the development impact of these cannot be overlooked. Now the Philippines faces a dual challenge of ensuring access to basic water supply and sanitation to underserved groups and reducing the health risks of the remainder of the population due to inadequacies of their water supply and sanitation infrastructure services.The large improvements in sanitation and water supply and the development impact of these cannot be overlooked. Now the Philippines faces a dual challenge of ensuring access to basic water supply and sanitation to underserved groups and reducing the health risks of the remainder of the population due to inadequacies of their water supply and sanitation infrastructure services.

12. Not DOH alone! Multisectoral cooperation key to improving access to water and sanitation services DoH, LUWA, DPWH, DENR, LGUs, DepEd Private sector Civil society Public Behavioral change Hand-washing Willingness to pay user fees

14. Poor Access to Water and Sanitation ? Waterborne Diseases Access to water and sanitation is still below national targets Population growth outpaces rate of improvement Pockets of low access to safe water and sanitation persist In areas where access is present, quality of water and sewerage services is inadequate

18. In areas where access is present, quality of water may be poor Although data show fairly high formal water supply access rates less than half of the population and only about 20% of the rural population have access to piped water supply and household connections And where there is access to piped services quality of such services in terms of continuity and bacteriological quality of drinking water often does not meet standards

19. Traditional water sources such as wells, ponds, rivers, and springs for drinking water decreased from 62% (1993) to 40% (2003) Piped household connections increased from 26% (1993) to 40% (2003) 58 % (urban) and 23% (rural) leads to increased water available for hygiene purposes Surveys show people with house connections use 150 liters of water per day 2x to 3x higher than those using other sources Estimated optimal health benefits can be achieved using 100 liters of water per day combined with good hand washing habits

20. Increasing reliance on water vendors 12% of the urban population in urban areas Irregular monitoring of water refilling stations and bottled water Unsafe water quality is common Studies of groundwater quality found that 58 percent of sampled groundwater tested positive for coliform bacteria Surveys of LGUs indicate that one half or more of their public water systems do not meet drinking water quality standards

21. In areas where access is present, quality of sewerage services is inadequate 4% of the population nationwide had access to sewerage connection vast majority of households utilizes septic tanks only about 3% (mostly rural) had acceptable on-site treatment and disposal

24. Poor Access to Water and Sanitation due to: Inadequate investment in safe water and sewerage services Weak regulatory environment National framework needs to be fully operationalized Clean Water Act of 2004 Philippine National Environmental Health Action Plan (NEHAP)

25. FULFILLING MD7 NEEDS MONEY Capital expenditures for water and sanitation sector have fluctuated at around P3 billion?4 billion a year almost entirely allocated to water. Compared to estimated needed investment for water supply of around P6 billion?7 billion a year to achieve MDG 7 goal of 90% access rate Implementing the provisions of the Clean Water Act will require additional annual expenditures of an estimated P35 billion

27. Build up DoH?s regulatory capacity CODE of SANITATION (PD 79 ) Chapter II, Section 9 (Water Supply) PHILIPPINE NATIONAL STANDARDS for DRINKING WATER (AO 12 s. 2007)

33. Clean Water Act consolidates the different fragmented laws on water resources management and sanitation provides fiscal and non-fiscal incentives to establishments that put up industrial wastewater treatment and/or adopt water pollution control technology, cleaner production and waste minimization mandates government financial institutions to accord high priority to extend financial services to water districts, LGUs and private companies engaged in sewerage services

34. National Environmental Health Action Plan aims to foster better collaboration of different stakeholders and allow participation of the public in decision-making implemented by different agencies (DOH, DENR, DILG, DPWH, DOST, DA, etc.) with environmental health-related activities coordinated through the Inter-Agency Committee on Environmental Health (IACEH)

35. Guide to DoH Actions Promote private sector participation Focus limited government funds to critical areas Generate concerted and coordinated response among key stakeholders Link incentive systems to performance benchmarks

36. DoH Actions Promote hygiene ( particularly hand washing and clean toilets), family planning and breastfeeding link with the women?s health and safe motherhood strategy and child health interventions Launch ?CLEANEST TOILETS? competition among DoH hospitals

37. DoH Actions Facilitate increased investments in safe water and sanitation Leverage ongoing Local Health System grants and Performance-based Public Health grants Increase LGU investments including accessing all types of financing Work within the PIPH & LGU scorecards frameworks

38. DoH Actions Improve the National Standards for Drinking Water with focus on how to ensure compliance and the accompanying compliance monitoring mechanisms How realistic are the required tests Focus on critical areas Build on existing partnerships with private sector Clarify role of B FAD

39. DoH Actions Provide technical assistance and capacity to LGUs and evenlocal water systems to: Strengthen water testing and compliance monitoring Conduct surveillance, outbreak management and containment in coordination with DoH

40. DoH Actions Generate/ conduct/ finance the conduct of studies Provide up to date technical advice of the health effects of water contamination, poor sanitation and other environmental health concerns ?CHAMPION of EVIDENCE-BASED DECISION-MAKING on WATER and SANITATION?


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