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CERN School Students’ Lab Modern Physics in µ Cosm PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Project Overview. CERN School Students’ Lab Modern Physics in µ Cosm. Overview. The Project(s) Goal Building Issues VERY VERY VERY Preliminary Planning. The Project(s). Originally one Project (started pushing for it in 1999) Split into three Sub-Projects

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CERN School Students’ Lab Modern Physics in µ Cosm

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Project Overview

CERN School Students’ LabModern Physics in µCosm


Overview

  • The Project(s)

  • Goal

  • Building Issues

  • VERY VERYVERY Preliminary Planning


The Project(s)

  • Originally one Project (started pushing for it in 1999)

  • Split into three Sub-Projects

    • The µCosm School Students’ Lab

    • Microcosm Gardens

    • UA1 Central Detector Display


Situation

  • µCosm is located in building 143


Project 1

µCosm School Students’ Lab


Goal

  • Present modern physics – education in this direction is part of the CERN mandate.

  • The School Students’ Lab will

    • provide a hands-on lab area for visiting (school) students

    • display and present modern physics to a more general public

    • extend the educational programme


µCosm

  • currently the complete building is used as exhibition space

  • most platforms are made of concrete


µCosm School Students’ Lab – General Idea


µCosm School Students’ Lab – General Idea cont’d


What is a “school students’ lab”?

  • In the recent past, many schools have faced the problem that out of financial reasons, only a very limited number of experiments could be acquired and performed in school.

  • This lead to a wave of “school students’ labs”, where these experiments and even more modern ones are made available and can be performed together with the personnel there.


Prototype School Students’ Lab Activity

  • standard school student lab activity is planned for 2.5 hrs

  • standard ingredients:

    • general and safety introduction

    • 2 experiment blocksà 50 mins

      • 5’ intro

      • 40’ experiment

      • 5’ discussion

    • break of 15 minsbetween

    • final discussion

  • done in

    • 3 experiments

    • ×3 groups

    • ×3 participants/group


Safety Considerations – Experiments

  • Voltages

    • nearly all experiments are made for schools according to the prevailing standards

  • CRT

    • vacuum glass tube

  • Gasses

    • LN2

    • dry ice

    • propane

  • Radioactive Material

    • Rutherford

      •  source in apparatus

    • Cloud Chamber

      • different sources

        • , , 

    • Natural Radiation

      • different sources

        • , , 

      • different materials


Project 2

Microcosm Gardens


Microcosm Gardens


Project 3

UA1 Central Detector Display


UA1 Central Detector Display


VERY VERYVERYPreliminary Planning

  • Now

    • Collecting Issues

  • Fall 2012

    • Clean up area in 143

    • Store UA1 Central Detector in 185

  • End 2012

    • Build partitioning wall

  • Winter 2012

    • Install services

  • Spring 2013

    • Install lab systems


X-Ray Experiments

  • X-Ray spectra

  • Material analysis

  • Radiography

    • MediPix

  • radiation-tested by RP


Experiment – High TC Superconductor

  • Record the voltage drop across a superconductor with varying temperature.

  • Measurement by dipping a probe with superconductor and platinum resistor into a bath of liquid nitrogen.

  • Handling of nitrogen by presenter.

  • Handling of probe by students.


Experiment – Self-built Cloud Chamber

  • Visualize charged tracks.

  • dry ice for cooling

  • IPA (C3H8O) for vapors

see

http://teachers/document/cloud-final.pdf


Experiment – Photoelectric Effect

  • Measure the kinetic energy of the electrons as a function of the frequency of the light.

  • Determine Planck’s constant h.

  • Measurement using a mercurylamp, filters, and an op-amp.

  • Hot mercury lamp.


Experiment – Rutherford Experiment

  • To record the direct counting rate Nd of particles scattered by a gold foil as function of the angle θ.

  • To determine the corrected counting rates N with respect to the scattering distribution in space.

  • To validate the “Rutherford’s scattering formula“

  • Measurement of count rate.

  • within plastic vessel

    •  emitter handled rarely by technical staff

    • plastic vessel evacuated (to min 50 Pa)


Experiment – Radiation

  • Look at different materials and their radioactivity.

    • school experiment sources

    • different materials, e.g. sands, watches, dust-bags

  • Measurement of count rate.

  • sources and other materialshandled by presenter and participants


Experiment – Electron Diffraction

  • Determination of wavelength of the electrons

  • Verification of the de Broglie’s equation

  • Determination of lattice plane spacings of graphite

  • Measurement through ob-servation of ring radius.

  • high voltage


Experiment – Fine Beam Tube ()

  • Study of the deflection of electrons in a magnetic field into a circular orbit.

  • Determination of the magnetic field B as a function of the acceleration potential U of the electrons at a constant radius r.

  • Determination of the specificcharge of the electron.

  • Measurement through ob-servation of beam radius.

  • nothing specific


Experiment – Franck-Hertz

  • To record a Franck-Hertz curve for neon.

  • To measure the discontinuous energy emission of free electrons for inelastic collision.

  • To interpret the measurement results as representing discrete energy absorption by neon atoms.

  • To observe the Ne-spectrallines resulting from the electron-collision excitation of neon atoms.

  • To identify the luminance phenomenon as layers with a high probability of excitation.

  • nothing specific


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