Surface Plasmon Resonance
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Karl Booksh School of Biochemistry Arizona State University (Tempe) Denise Wilson Department of Electrical Engineering University of Washington (Seattle) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Surface Plasmon Resonance Portable Biochemical Sensing Systems. Karl Booksh School of Biochemistry Arizona State University (Tempe) Denise Wilson Department of Electrical Engineering University of Washington (Seattle) National Science Foundation, Grant #ECS0300537.

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Karl Booksh School of Biochemistry Arizona State University (Tempe) Denise Wilson Department of Electrical Engineering University of Washington (Seattle)

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Karl booksh school of biochemistry arizona state university tempe denise wilson department of electrical engineering un

Surface Plasmon Resonance

Portable Biochemical Sensing Systems

Karl Booksh

School of Biochemistry

Arizona State University (Tempe)

Denise Wilson

Department of Electrical Engineering

University of Washington (Seattle)

National Science Foundation, Grant #ECS0300537


Karl booksh school of biochemistry arizona state university tempe denise wilson department of electrical engineering un

Surface Plasmon Resonance

Portable Biochemical Sensing Systems

ECS0300537

  • The Big Picture

    • Why SPR?

      • Highly sensitive (10-4 to 10-6 RI units)

      • Very local (10-100nm from sensing surface)

      • Directly indicative (of interactions between sensor and environment)

      • Relatively unencumbered by sampling overhead (e.g. tagging, mixing, etc)

      • Readily referenced to compensate for background fluctuations (e.g. drift)

    • How is it used (SPR = transduction mechanism)?

      • Non-functionalized = bulk refractive index

      • Functionalized = specific analytes

    • The Full Spectrum of SPR-based instruments

      • User-Intensive, Single Measurements: Biacore

      • User-Intensive, Single Field Measurements: TI Spreeta (Chinowsky/Yee)

      • Distributed and Autonomous, Multiple Measurements:

        • Insertion-based probes

        • Compact signal processing

        • Streamlined, robust optical path


Karl booksh school of biochemistry arizona state university tempe denise wilson department of electrical engineering un

Surface Plasmon Resonance

Portable Biochemical Sensing Systems

  • Who are we?

    • Karl Booksh, Biochemistry, Arizona State University (Probes and Functionalization)

    • Denise Wilson, Electrical Engineering, University of Washington (Signal Processing and Systems Integration)

    • Are we interdisciplinary? Tight integration of biochemistry and electrical engineering

  • Goal of this Research

    • Surface Plasmon Resonance

      • Field monitoring at numerous locations

      • What defines the problem?

        • Ability to sense specific analytes at high sensitivity/low detection limit

        • With high resilience to ambient fluctuations

          • light, temperature,

          • other factors that influence bulk refractive index

        • In a manner that allows continuous sampling with little overhead

        • In a footprint that is non-intrusive or easily carried (handheld)


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems basic operation

Sample

Surface Plasma Wave

Evanescent Wave

Metal

θinc

Substrate

Incident Light

Reflected Light

Optical Fiber w/ Cladding

Gold Coating

Exposed Core

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsBasic Operation

When the wave vector closely matches that of the surface plasmon at the metal-sample interface, reflected light is significantly attenuated

ko = 2p/l


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems configurations

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing Systems Configurations

  • Point of resonance can be detected at a

    • Particular angle (constant wavelengh interrogation)

    • Particular wavelength (constant angle interrogation)

  • Constant Angle

    • Polychromatic light source at constant angle of incidence

  • Constant Wavelength

    • Monochromatic light source at different angles of incidence

Constant Angle is chosen here for: inexpensive light source, easy alignment, and simpler, more compact configuration (= less overhead)


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems sensor design

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsSensor Design

  • Sampling Options:

  • In-line

  • “Dip” insertion-based probe

  • The probe configuration is :

  • easily replaced, easy to use

  • Less prone to sensor layer blocking,

  • but can be

  • more sensitive to ambient fluctuations

  • more susceptible to fouling


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems typical output

Air

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsTypical Output

Increasing RI

Raw Data (background overwhelms resonance)

Referenced Data (Resonance is evident)


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems summary of effort

Multivariate Calibration

Communication/ADC Overhead

Measurement to Reference Ratio

High Resolution Regression

Low Resolution Regression

Multivariate Calibration

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsSummary of Effort

Approach #1 (Traditional)

Software

High Resolution Photodetection

Approach #2 (Voltage-Mode, Partially Integrated)

Software

Integration Time Programming

Low Resolution Photodetection

“Flatlining” Reference Ratio


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems summary of effort1

Approach #4 (Current-Mode, Fully Integrated)

Software

Multivariate Calibration

Multivariate Calibration

Dark Current Compensation

Low Resolution Regression

Low Resolution Photodetection

“Flatlining” Current Scaling

Approach #3 (Pulse-Mode, Fully Integrated)

Software

“Flatlining” Current Scaling

Low Resolution Regression

Low Resolution Photodetection

Conversion to Pulse Mode

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsSummary of Effort


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems system on chip implementations

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsSystem-on-Chip Implementations

Approach #2

All Designs are mixed signal, fabricated in standard CMOS

Approach #4

Approach #3


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems system on chip implementations1

Pixel

Analog Sampling

Phototransistor

Digital Control

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsSystem-on-Chip Implementations

15 pixel array fabricated on a 1cm2 die in the 1.5 micron AMI process through MOSIS

2mm


Surface plasmon resonance portable biochemical sensing systems system on chip implementations2

Surface Plasmon ResonancePortable Biochemical Sensing SystemsSystem-on-Chip Implementations


Karl booksh school of biochemistry arizona state university tempe denise wilson department of electrical engineering un

Surface Plasmon Resonance

Portable Biochemical Sensing Systems

  • What’s the bottom line?

    • Benchmarking has shown system-on-chip to be competitive with software solutions

    • Compact, low user-overhead, low-power SPR nodes have been enabled:

      • Environmental Monitoring (e.g. coastal/ocean/freshwater)

      • Denise sensor networks for maintaining public safety (e.g. water supply)

      • Biomedical applications (e.g. point of care, preventative heart attack monitoring)

    • Students (3 MS, 2 undergraduate, 2 of which are women)

    • Outreach/Broader Impact

      • SPR modeling and simulation integrated into electronic nose toolbox

      • www.ee.washington.edu/research/enose

    • Technology Transfer

      • Probe design is patented and licensed to two companies in Phoenix

      • SOC designs are fabricated in standard CMOS

      • Optical components are modular and readily available


Karl booksh school of biochemistry arizona state university tempe denise wilson department of electrical engineering un

Surface Plasmon Resonance

Portable Biochemical Sensing Systems

  • Publications

    • Denise M. Wilson and Lisa E. Hansen, “Current-mode System-on-Chip for SPR Sensing Systems,” IEEE Sensors Journal, submitted for publication, June 2006.

    • Lisa E. Hansen and Denise M. Wilson, “System-on-chip Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors Using Pulse-based Interface Circuits,” IEEE Sensors Journal, submitted for publication, March 2006.

    • M.W. Johnston, Lisa E. Hansen, and Denise M. Wilson, “System-on-Chip Circuit Architecture for Eliminating Interferents in Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensing Systems,” IEEE Sensors Journal, submitted for publication, January 2006.

    • Lisa E. Hansen, Matthew Johnston, and Denise M. Wilson, “System-on-chip Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors Using Pulse-based Interface Circuits,” IEEE Sensors: Irvine, California, October 2005.

    • Matthew Johnston, Denise Wilson, Karl Booksh, and Jeffrey Cramer, “Integrated Optical Computing: System on Chip for Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging,” Intl. Symp. Circuits and Systems, ISCAS: Kobe, Japan, May 2005.

    • Lisa Hansen, Matthew Johnston, and Denise Wilson, “Pulse-based Interface Circuits for SPR Sensing Systems,” Intl. Symp. Circuits and Systems, ISCAS: Kobe, Japan, May 2005.

    • Denise M. Wilson, Mike Warren, Karl Booksh, and Louis Obando, “Integrated Optical Computing for Portable, Real-time SPR Analysis of Environmental Pollutants,” Eurosensors 2002: Prague, Czech Republic, September 2002.


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