Tobacco prevention and control in schools information on a need to know basis
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Tobacco Prevention and Control in Schools: Information on a Need-to-Know Basis. Knowledge is the Key. We live in a world where information is readily available at our fingertips. It is important for us to use information to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

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Tobacco Prevention and Control in Schools: Information on a Need-to-Know Basis

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Tobacco prevention and control in schools information on a need to know basis

Tobacco Prevention and Control in Schools:Information on a Need-to-Know Basis


Knowledge is the key

Knowledge is the Key

  • We live in a world where information is readily available at our fingertips.

  • It is important for us to use information to make a positive difference in the lives of others.


Information on a need to know basis

Information on a “Need-to-Know” Basis

When it comes to tobacco prevention in schools, there are lots of people that “need to know” how to make tobacco-free schools a reality.


What we all need to know

What We All “Need to Know”

Tobacco use increases youth’s chances of suffering from chronic diseases and cancer.

4


What we all need to know1

What We All “Need to Know”

  • Nicotine affects a part of the brain responsible for decisionmaking and logical thinking.

  • Nicotine also affects parts of the brain responsible for aggression and emotional control.

  • Adolescents using nicotine have a harder time focusing on tasks.

  • There also appear to be impairments in memory: even secondhand smoke can cause brain impairments!

5


What we all need to know2

What We All “Need to Know”

Nicotine has been shown to decrease metabolic activity throughout the brain, making it less active.

6


What we all need to know3

What We All “Need to Know”

Secondhand smoke can cause:

  • Ear infections

  • Asthma attacks

  • Allergic reactions

  • Cancer

  • Smelly clothes

  • Red, irritated eyes

7


Your students need to know

Your Students “Need to Know”

Tobacco is the leading killer in our country and around the world. Nearly every part of the body can be affected by tobacco.

8


Your students need to know1

Emerging and Unique Tobacco Products

Your Students “Need to Know”

There are more and more new tobacco products being introduced on the market. However, NO tobacco product is safe!


Your parents need to know

Your Parents “Need to Know”

They are the first line of defense in making sure their kids are protected from the dangers of tobacco use.


Your parents need to know1

Your Parents “Need to Know”

They need to talk early and often with their kids about how to avoid tobacco use.


Your parents need to know2

Your Parents “Need to Know”

Even when kids don’t use tobacco, they can still be affected by it. Being exposed to secondhand smoke in the home can cause serious health effects.


Your teachers and staff need to know

Your Teachers and Staff “Need to Know”

Tobacco use negatively affects a student’s ability to learn in the classroom and participate in school activities.


How does tobacco affect classroom performance

How Does Tobacco Affect Classroom Performance?

Decreased concentration in class.

Increased absenteeism due to illness and truancy.

Decreased athletic performance due to the physical effects of nicotine and tobacco smoke.


As a school administrator you need to know

As a School Administrator, You “Need to Know”

  • There are benefits of tobacco prevention in the school environment:

  • Fewer fires

  • Lower maintenance costs

  • More environmentally friendly school


As a school administrator you need to know1

As a School Administrator, You “Need to Know”

  • The negative impacts of suspension:

  • Students who are suspended are more likely to:

    • participate in illegal activities

    • use tobacco and other illicit substances

    • do poorly in school

    • eventually drop out of school

  • Dropouts are significantly more likely to be incarcerated and have lower incomes than high school graduates, which has a detrimental impact on the entire community.


Tobacco prevention resources for school administrators

Tobacco PreventionResources for School Administrators


Aspire a s moking p revention i nte r active e xperience

ASPIRE (ASmoking Prevention Interactive Experience)

  • The program targets middle and high schoolstudents.

  • ASPIRE includes interactive, multimedia curricula and resources for students, parents and teachers.


Aspire a s moking p revention i nte r active e xperience1

ASPIRE (ASmoking Prevention Interactive Experience)

  • Benefits of ASPIRE

  • No cost for students and educators to participate.

  • Minimal staff time needed.

  • Online resources provided for administrators to track student progress.


Alternative to suspension ats

Alternative to Suspension (ATS)

  • Mandatory program offered to students who violate the school's tobacco-free policies.

  • The goal of ATS is to create an increased readinessto change tobacco use.


Alternative to suspension ats1

Alternative to Suspension (ATS)

Four-session program

(50 minutes each)

  • Conducted outside of normal class hours.

  • Offers an educational opportunity about tobacco use.

  • Allows students to stay in the classroom.


North carolina tobacco use quitline

North Carolina Tobacco Use Quitline

A free, private tobacco use treatment service.

Available in English, Spanish and other languages.

Helps people from every part of the state.

Now available daily during convenient times.


Not on tobacco n o t

Not-On-Tobacco (N-O-T)

Available to students who have gone through ATS.

The goal of N-O-T is to help participants quit smoking or significantly reduce the number of cigarettes they smoke.


North carolina 100 tobacco free schools

North Carolina 100% Tobacco-Free Schools

  • The 100 percent tobacco-free schools have a policy that prohibits the use of any tobacco products by anyone (students, staff and visitors) on school grounds or at school events at all times.

  • All school districts in North Carolina have a 100 percent tobacco-free schools policy in place.

  • Provides compliance training and resources.


100 tobacco free schools tackle smoking project

100% Tobacco-Free Schools: Tackle Smoking Project

  • Designed to prevent tobacco use at high school football games.

  • Activities and materials include:

    • Student volunteer groups

    • Promotional signs and cards

    • Messages from stadium announcer


Benefits of 100 tobacco free schools

Benefits of 100% Tobacco-Free Schools

Reduces children's observation of tobacco use and provides positive role modeling regarding tobacco use, respect for state laws that limit youth access, and working and living in smoke-free places.

Supports prevention messages delivered in classrooms by sending clear, consistent non-use messages.

Provides safe environment for students by reducing exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.


Benefits of 100 tobacco free schools1

Benefits of 100% Tobacco-Free Schools

  • Complies with federal legislation prohibiting smoking inside school buildings and is consistent with the state law on smoking in public places.

  • Proactively protects schools from the unnecessary risk of future liability by prohibiting smoking on school premises.

  • Reduces the risk of fires due to smoking materials.


Communicating violations to the 100 tobacco free policy

Communicating Violations to the 100% Tobacco-Free Policy

“Excuse me, you’re probably not aware that the school district now has a 100 percent tobacco-free school policy in place. This means no tobacco use anywhere on campus, at any time, by anyone. We ask that everyone comply with the policy. Thanks.”

“I’m sorry, but I’ll need to ask you to comply with our school district’s 100 percent tobacco-free school policy by putting out your cigarette. The aim of our policy is to protect our students, staff, and school visitors from secondhand smoke and to model healthy behavior for all students. Thank you for your cooperation.”


Communicating violations to the 100 tobacco free policy1

Communicating Violations to the 100% Tobacco-Free Policy

“Excuse me, you may not be aware but we have a 100 percent tobacco-free school policy in place on our campus. We ask that everyone, including staff and visitors, refrain from using any tobacco products, including spit tobacco, until they leave the campus. Thanks.”

“Excuse me, you may not be aware of this but our school board recently enacted a district-wide 100 percent tobacco-free school policy. This means no tobacco use anywhere on campus, by anyone, at any time. This policy is designed to ensure a positive and healthy learning and working environment for students. Thanks."


Other options for addressing tobacco violations

Other Options for Addressing Tobacco Violations

  • Perform service projects in the community or at the school.

  • Write a paper on the harmful effects of tobacco or the effects that tobacco has on the environment.

  • Create tobacco prevention educational awareness materials for the school.

  • Develop “creative” punishments, including restricting extracurricular activities and lunch with peers.


Summary

Summary

  • Tobacco is a deadly drug that robs our children's future.

  • Together, we can work to make our homes and schools a safe place against the dangers of tobacco use.

  • Knowledge is the key!


Photograph credits

Slide 1: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 2: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 3: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 4: Photograph courtesy of Jan Sandvik/ Photos.com.

Slide 6: Photograph courtesy of Fotosearch, LLC. Illustration Dayle Johnson, RTI International.

Slide 7: Photograph courtesy of Aleksandr Ugorenkov/Photos.com.

Slide 8: Photograph courtesy of Comstock/ Photos.com.

Slide 9: Photographs courtesy of iStockphoto and RTI International (“Little Cigars”).

Slide 10: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 11: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto

Slide 12: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto..

Slide 13: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 14: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 15: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 16: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 17: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 18: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 19: Photograph courtesy of Catherine Yeulet/Photos.com.

Slide 21: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 23: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 26: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 27: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Slide 31: Photograph courtesy of iStockphoto.

Photographs are used for illustrative purposes only, and any persons depicted are models.

Photograph Credits


Tobacco prevention and control in schools information on a need to know basis

Prepared by Ronny Bell, Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity; Sterling Fulton-Smith, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services; Caley Burrus, Duke University; Sandhya Joshi, RTI International; Barri Burrus, RTI International; and Caroline Lawson, RTI International.

April 2012


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