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SCOPE OF THE HEALTH CARE COST CHALLENGE National Health Policy Audioconference July 30, 2002 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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SCOPE OF THE HEALTH CARE COST CHALLENGE National Health Policy Audioconference July 30, 2002. Professor James C. Robinson University of California, Berkeley. Surge in Health Insurance Premiums. Insurance premiums: Large groups: 10-20% CalPERS 25%? Small groups and individuals: 10-50%

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SCOPE OF THE HEALTH CARE COST CHALLENGE National Health Policy Audioconference July 30, 2002

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Scope of the health care cost challenge national health policy audioconference july 30 2002 l.jpg

SCOPE OF THE HEALTH CARE COST CHALLENGENational Health Policy AudioconferenceJuly 30, 2002

Professor James C. Robinson

University of California, Berkeley


Surge in health insurance premiums l.jpg

Surge in Health Insurance Premiums

  • Insurance premiums:

    • Large groups: 10-20%

    • CalPERS 25%?

    • Small groups and individuals: 10-50%

  • Effect on number of Californians with health insurance coverage?

  • Effect on the insurance benefits for those who retain coverage?


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Short Term Drivers of Health Care Cost Inflation

  • Pharmaceutical products

  • Labor market: nurses, techs, pharmacists

  • Hospital consolidation and market power

  • Unsustainably low margins in physician practices, nursing homes, home health, etc.

  • Regulations and benefit mandates


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Long Term Drivers of Health Care Cost Inflation

  • Continuing clinical innovation

    • Drugs, devices, procedures

  • Continuing regulation and litigation

  • Demographics: only a minor contributor

  • Most important: rising social expectations


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What Do People Want from Their Health Care System?

  • Afghanistan: Reduce mortality

  • Portugal: Reduce morbidity

  • Canada:Improve functionality

  • United States:Feel better

  • California:Look better

  • West L.A.:Look real good


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Revenues are Limited

  • Even with unprecedented prosperity, social resources for health care were limited

    • We cannot spend the same budget surplus twice

    • Non-health priorities: education, social security

    • Taxpayer support for tax cuts

  • Unprecedented prosperity is gone

    • Budget deficits

    • Tight employer budgets and cost cutting


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The Fundamental Imperative

  • Limited resources, unlimited expectations

  • Setting priorities is imperative

  • Where and by whom will this be done?

  • Government?

  • Employers, insurers, providers?

  • Consumers themselves?


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The End of Managed Care

  • Politicians, the press, and the public love to use HMOs as a whipping boy for system ills

  • But health plans are tired of this

  • Strategy A: merge with a tobacco company

  • Strategy B: merge with a drug company

  • Strategy C: re-invent health insurance


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From Managed Care to Health Insurance

  • Major drivers of cost inflation are not under control of health plans (drugs, expectations)

  • Controlling costs (provider revenues, consumer expectations) is a dirty job

  • Health insurance: America wants more

  • Managed care: America want less

  • The industry is shifting to consumerism


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Health Insurance Consumerism:Models from other Industries

  • Mutual fund companies sell an array of investment products, add information and decision support tools, and facilitate rather than supplant consumer decisions

  • Non-health insurers predict trends, charge actuarially fair premiums, but do not seek to control the costs of the services they insure


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Components of Health Insurance Redesign

  • Benefit design

  • Network design and contracting

  • Medical and disease management

  • Connectivity among all participants

  • Info and decision support to consumers


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Challenges to a Consumer-Driven Health Insurance System

  • Consumers lack good information on benefits, providers, prices, quality

  • Consumers vary in health status

    • Risk selection and cherry picking

  • Consumers vary in income

    • Easier to do implicit than explicit subsidies


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Virtues of a Consumer-Driven Health Insurance System

  • Everyone feels strongly about health care, but everyone has unique preferences, goals

  • No one size fits all

  • We are all more careful spending our own money than somebody else’s money

  • America wants a system based on responsible individual choice, with protections for the most vulnerable


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A Bit of Wisdom

  • “We have met the enemy, and he is us.”

    • (Pogo)


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