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SLM Portfolio

Krista McCormick

Fall 2008

Click here to eClinter

The only true equalisers in the world are books; the only treasure-house open to all comers is a library; the only wealth which will not decay is knowledge; the only jewel which you can carry beyond the grave is wisdom.- J. A. Langford

Click Here to Enter.


Krista mccormick s exit portfolio

Krista McCormick’s Exit Portfolio

Click here to enter the Table of Contents.

Welcome to my SLM Portfolio.

This portfolio is designed for the McDaniel School Library Media Program and organized according to the four AASL/NCATE Standards for Professional Preparation Programs for School Library Media Specialists .

American Association of School Librarians’ Information Power identifies the four roles of a SLM. As you go through this portfolio, please look for evidence of my:

role as (a) information specialist, (b) teacher, (c) instructional xxpartner, and (d) program administrator;

reflection on practice;

integration of standards;

personal growth.

To navigate this electronic portfolio, click on the individual links throughout the presentation to navigate to the desired pages.

  • The best place to begin is the Table of Contents. There you will find links to all of the following elements:

    • Overviews of all four of AASL’s certification standards

    • Reflection statements and artifacts for all thirteen related objectives to the AASL standards

    • My professional resume.

Feel free to contact me about anything concerningthis portfolio:

Krista McCormick


Table of contents

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Table of Contents

  • Introduction

  • Resume

  • Standard One

    • Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior

    • Literacy and Reading

    • Access to Information

    • Stimulating Learning Environment

  • Standard Two

    • Knowledge of Learners and Learning

    • Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher

    • Information Literacy Curriculum

  • Standard Three

    • Connection with the Library Community

    • Instructional Partner

    • Educational Leader

  • Standard Four

    • Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, Using

    • Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical

    • Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard one

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard One

USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Standard 1 Overview

  • “School library media candidates encourage reading and lifelong learning by

  • stimulating interests and fostering competencies in the effective use of ideas and

  • information. They apply a variety of strategies to ensure access to resources

  • and information in a variety of formats to all members of the learning community.

  • Candidates promote efficient and ethical information-seeking behavior as part of

  • the school library media program and its services.” From Overview of ALA/AASL Standards for School Library Media Specialist Preparation

  • Related Objectives to Standard 1

  • Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements:

  • Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior

  • Literacy and Reading

  • Access to Information

  • Stimulating Learning Environment

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard one1

ARTIFACT

Database Lesson

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard One

  • USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior

    • Candidates model strategies to locate, evaluate and use information for specific purposes.

Reflections

18,900,000: The number of hits returned when using the keywords “nutrition” and “schools” in a Google search.

59: The number of hits returned when using the keywords “nutrition” and “schools” using Primary Search.

When asked to solve an information problem, most students, without hesitation, will turn to Google to begin a search. While this may sometimes seem to be the easiest route to information, it may also be overwhelming and may not direct students to appropriate, authentic sources of information. It is a media specialist’s job to change this practice and model strategies to locate, evaluate and use information for specific purposes. In the lesson “Where’s the Ice Cream?” students access information through a database. The goal is to gather information in order to write a letter to explain opinions concerning a relevant topic, snacks at school. In lieu of Google, students are introduced to the online database Primary Search. In the lesson, I model how to locate the database through the public library. The students generate keywords to form a query. They analyze the search results based on reading level, relevance, and article format. They choose the best article(s) for their needs. Finally they record facts and opinions about the topic in order to write a persuasive letter. The lesson takes the students step-by-step through the process and then allows them to repeat the process with a partner. (Continued)

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard one2

ARTIFACT

Database Lesson

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard One

  • USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Efficient and Ethical Information-Seeking Behavior

    • Candidates model strategies to locate, evaluate and use information for specific purposes.

Reflections

(Continued)

This 3-class lesson proved to be a great introduction to online databases for my 5th grade students. They entered the classroom knowing very little about performing a search using an electronic resource. By the end, students were able to identify a database as an electronic resource, they had a better understanding of generating key words for a search, and they were able to successfully navigate the database Primary Search. With this new knowledge, my students will now be able to access information in magazines geared toward students. The database is organized in a way which makes finding an article that meets the student’s needs on the student’s reading level an easy process.

I must admit before designing this lesson, when faced with an information problem while teaching, I often exclaimed “Let’s Google it and find out.” Now, I have expanded my own knowledge of resources and can expertly model how to use them. I feel it is important that students learn how to effectively locate, evaluate and use information so that they can become administrators of their own learning. Back

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard one3

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Children’s Literature Annotations

Standard One

  • USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Literacy and Reading

    • Candidates are aware of major trends in reading material for children and youth

Reflections

“Mrs. McCormick, do you have any more of those Children’s Choice Award books in the media center?” I was asked by Daquan, a 4th grader new to our school. This seemingly simple question was a challenge to me. Could I find a book that would interest Daquan? Because of questions like this, a library media specialist must be aware of major trends in reading material for children and youth so that she is knowledgeable of books that will appeal to and benefit her learning community. In Get Hooked on Books, I’ve compiled a binder of book annotations through which students can browse to find appealing books. Students are introduced to multicultural books such as Laughing Tomatoes and Other Spring Poems by Jitomates Risuenos. They can find books that integrate content curriculum such as Polar Bear Math by Ann Whitehead Nogda. Also, students like Daquan can discover many ALA’s Notable Children’s books such as Because of Winn Dixie by Kate DiCamillo.

I have found that Get Hooked on Books should not be a static document but one that is always changing and growing to meet the needs of a changing community and address the new trends in children literature. My current community has a strong African American and Latino culture so I must now research and purchase books to appeal to this part of my community.

Continued

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Standard one4

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Children’s Literature Annotations

Standard One

  • USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Literacy and Reading

    • Candidates are aware of major trends in reading material for children and youth

Reflections

(Continued)

We also have many below grade level and reluctant readers, so I must continue to investigate trends such as using Graphic Novels to encourage these students to read. As I use the current trends to add books to my collection, I will highlight these books in many ways including the Get Hooked on Books binder.

So when Daquan asked about a Children’s Choice Award book, I was able to show him Dragonrider by Cornelia Funke, as well as, Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry, and Charlie Bone and the Invisible Boy by Jenny Nimmo. I was able to do this because of my growing awareness of major trends in reading materials for children and youth. Back

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard one5

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACTS

Homework Helpers

Laurel Woods PAC

Student Resources

Teacher Resources

Howard County Public Library

Standard One

  • USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Access to Information

    • The candidate identifies means of providing remote access to information.

  • Reflections

  • He is wise who knows the sources of knowledge -- where it is written and where it is to be found.

    • A.A. Hodge

  • Daily I am asked questions to which I do not know the answers, but every day I am confident that I will be able to find the answers using a variety of resources. I wish to instill in my students the understanding that, although they may not know “everything,” they have the resources to find the answers to a multitude of questions. In order to help my students and staff become seekers of knowledge, my Laurel Woods Elementary School Media Center website provides remote access to a variety of information sources. “Homework Helpers” provides links to HCPSS subscription databases such as World Book Online and SIRS. Student and teacher resource pages provide access to a variety of content driven websites and search engines such as Kids Click! and The Big 6. Students and staff are also given remote access to HCPSS’s Public Access Catalog (PAC).Finally, a page is dedicated to resources found at the public library such as their PAC and subscription databases. My goal is to produce wise students and staff who know the sources to find the knowledge they seek. My webpage allows them to find this knowledge with a click of the mouse.

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Standard one6

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Media Design

Standard One

  • USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Stimulating Learning Environment

    • Candidates plan and organize library media centers according to their use by the learning community.

Reflections

Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.

-Steve Jobs

Designing a elementary school media center is not an easy feat. The designer must plan and organize it according to its use by the entire learning community. This community includes students, teachers and family members. All users must be provided open access to all resources, and the space must be organized to accommodate different learning situations. In my media design project I was able to design a stimulating environment that meets the needs of all users.

The media center facility is designed for a variety of learning activities so media objectives and content objectives are met. There is an instructional area (story area) where I can instruct with students sitting in close proximity on the carpet. In some lessons and with some grades, this is the best arrangement me to have the undivided attention of the students as well as meet the goals of students with IEPs. There are also instructional areas where students can complete written tasks, group work and production tasks. These areas can also accommodate such activities as staff meetings, PTA meetings and tutoring sessions. I have access to state-of-the-art projection equipment and computer applications to meet every student’s learning style.

Print resources are organized and clearly labels on low shelves to promote easy student access. A professional collection of print resources (continued)

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Standard one7

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Media Design

Standard One

  • USE OF INFORMATION & IDEAS

  • Stimulating Learning Environment

    • Candidate plan and organize library media centers according to their use by the learning community.

Reflections

(Continued)

is available for staff members. Students and staff also have access to various non- print media. A computer station and computer lab gives network and database access to students, staff, and the community.

An administrative area is planned to meet the needs of the media staff. I have a clear sight line to all areas of the media center with the exclusion of the stationary computer lab. The office and storage room have ample storage space. Collaborative planning can occur in the office, but could also take place in one of the instructional or lounge areas in the media center.

Finally the space itself accommodates the student population. The attached design allows for more than 6 square feet per student. The media center is roughly 6,300 square feet and the student population of 700 requires 4,200 square feet. The furniture is sturdy, durable, and functional as required by the MD state standards. It is appropriately spaced to allow students with special needs open access to resources.

In a media design, style and substance go hand in hand. The media center needs to be inviting and pleasing to the eye, but it also needs to work for all who require the numerous resources held within. Most importantly I have found that I must create an environment that will provide space and resources to set learning in motion. In this space, students will learn to love literature and they will learn to solve problems and answer questions by accessing and using information with confidence. Back

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard two

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Two

Teaching and Learning

  • Standard 2 Overview

  • “School library media candidates model and promote collaborative planning with

  • classroom teachers in order to teach concepts and skills of information

  • processes integrated with classroom content. They partner with other education

  • professionals to develop and deliver an integrated information skills curriculum.

  • Candidates design and implement instruction that engages the student’s

  • interests, passions, and needs which drive their learning.” From Overview of ALA/AASL Standards for School Library Media Specialist Preparation

  • Related Objectives to Standard 2

  • Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements:

  • Knowledge of Learners and Learning

  • Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher

  • Information Literacy Curriculum

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard two1

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACTS

My Pyramid Lesson

My Pyramid Lesson 2

My Pyramid Plan Sheet

My Pyramid Review Sheet

Standard Two

  • TEACHING AND LEARNING

  • Knowledge of Learners and Learning

    • Candidates design library media instruction that assesses learner needs, instructional methodologies, and information processes to assure that each is integral to information skills instruction.

Reflections

To be an exceptional teacher one must understand the difference between assessment of learning and assessment for learning. The library media specialist must design instruction in which the assessment of learner needs, instructional methodologies and information processes is ongoing and formative. Assessment does not just happen at the end of a project; it is present throughout the lesson. The results of these assessments should show how the students are learning at every step and should guide instruction.

In a lesson plan, the LMC must include a pre-assessment of student knowledge at the beginning of each lesson and an assessment of knowledge gained through out the lesson. The key is to be able to analyze the results of the assessment instantly and guide your lesson based on these results. In my Kindergarten My Pyramid Unit, students were first asked to give examples of healthy foods. With the answers I received, including one which was “blue”, I could decide whether students had enough knowledge to sort pictures into the categories of healthy and not healthy. Based in this pre-assessment, I decided to focus more time on this health objective in one class before integrating my information literacy objectives. In all other classes, I could move ahead more rapidly. During the lesson, the Think-Pair-Share strategy, helped me assess students’ knowledge of information sources. This assessment led me to give more guidance to 2 of the classes. (Continued)

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Standard two2

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Two

  • TEACHING AND LEARNING

  • Knowledge of Learners and Learning

    • Candidates design library media instruction that assesses learner needs, instructional methodologies, and information processes to assure that each is integral to information skills instruction.

Reflections

(Continued)

At the conclusion of the first My Pyramid lesson, students were informally assessed on both the content objective and the information literacy objective. The results of this assessment helped me see where to start the next lesson in the unit.

A formal lesson plan must be flexible. This 2- lesson unit actually turned into a 3- lesson unit. While assessing the lesson on an ongoing basis, I had to adjust my timing of the activities and spend more time on some objectives. In reviewing my assessment results, I was also able to determine who needed more support during the independent part of the activity.

Finally, I assessed my instructional practices. I found that some students needed help with Think-Pair-Share, and I had to spend time teaching how to share information with one another. I also discussed the results of the lesson with a colleague, who praised the idea of sorting for the collage as a great way for primary students to show that they can use information appropriately.

I will teach this unit again. I have not changed my formal lesson plans, but I know that I will not teach this year’s kindergartners exactly they same as I did last year’s. I will make sure that assessment of learner needs, instructional methodologies, and information processes are integral to my information skills instruction. Back

  • ARTIFACTS

  • My Pyramid Lesson

  • My Pyramid Lesson 2

  • My Pyramid Plan Sheet

  • My Pyramid Review Sheet

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard two3

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Comic Life Lesson Presentation

Standard Two

  • TEACHING AND LEARNING

  • Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher

    • Candidates analyze the role of student interest and motivation in instructional design.

Reflections

To waken interest and kindle enthusiasm is the sure way to teach easily and successfully. -Tryon Edwards

Each week after teaching Ms. Rieg’s third grade class last year, I felt exhausted, defeated, and unsuccessful. “How do I reach these students?” I would ask my team mates time and time again, “This is too hard!” Then I learned about the application Comic Life and I designed a lesson in which I was able to analyze the role of student interest.

This group students loves using the computer and reading comic books. Knowing the final project was a computer generated comic page kept students engaged in the teacher led and written components of the lesson. The students identified the traits of the main characters in Tops and Bottoms by Janet Stevens and made a comic page to show the character traits. While completing the Comic Life project, all students were engaged, motivated, and confident. Problematic students became teachers. Quiet students learned to take risks. Students who had difficulty with reading and writing were proud of their final projects.

While teaching a lesson designed to target student interest, I was able to exclaim to my teammates, “Ms. Rieg’s class was awesome today!” Teaching had become easy and we were successful!

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard two4

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Character Lesson

Standard Two

  • TEACHING AND LEARNING

  • Information Literacy Curriculum

    • Candidates employ strategies to integrate the information literacy curriculum with content curriculum.

Reflections

What's another word for Thesaurus? -Steven Wright

As a classroom teacher, it was always such a struggle to expand students’ descriptive vocabulary. Students’ word choice consisted of good, bad, happy, and sad. Although I managed to design lessons to help students develop varied word choice, I would have been happy to have some assistance. The library media specialist is the perfect candidate for this role. By integrating the information literacy curriculum with the content curriculum, the LMS can work collaboratively with teachers to help students succeed.

In my Character lesson, thesaurus and dictionary skills are taught in connection with a language arts objective. Students are studying character traits, yet they are not limited to known words to describe and compare characters. They are able to access and use information found in a thesaurus and/or dictionary to assign descriptive words to characters. So instead of describing the character as sad, they will use words such as miserable or despondent. Students practice finding synonyms, definitions, and pronunciations of words. Students also evaluate the two resources and decide which is more useful. Students can then use these resources effectively in the classroom.

As a classroom teacher, I would have loved to have worked with the LMS to integrate our curriculums. As a media specialist, I have learned to make collaboration a priority. We will integrate our curriculum so that we can work together to positively effect student achievement.

Courtesy of Toothpaste for Dinner

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard three

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Three

Collaboration and Leadership

  • Standard 3 Overview

  • “School library media candidates provide leadership and establish connections

  • with the greater library and education community to create school library media

  • programs that focus on students learning and achievement; encourage the

  • personal and professional growth of teachers and other educators, and model

  • the efficient and effective use of information and ideas.”From Overview of ALA/AASL Standards for School Library Media Specialist Preparation

  • Related Objectives to Standard 3

  • Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements:

  • Connection with the Library Community

  • Instructional Partner

  • Educational Leader

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard three1

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Three

  • COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP

  • Connection with the Library Community

    • Candidates employ strategies to ensure connections between the school community and the larger library world of public, academic, special libraries, and information centers.

Reflections

To know where you can find anything, that in short is the largest part of learning.

- Anonymous

We have many roles as library media specialists, but one of the most important is making students the facilitators of their own learning. Students must become adept at finding sources of information. We must teach them not to confine themselves to our school media center, but to reach out to the larger library world. We must introduce them to public, academic, special libraries, and information centers so that they are able to find just the right resources needed for their learning.

While researching Susan B. Anthony, a student came across an article on SIRS Discover that was interesting but in Full Text format. She expressed a wish for the article to be in PDF format. I was able to direct her to Primary Search found at the public library and she found the same article in PDF format and was more easily able to gain information from the article. The students at LWES are unaware of how “learning friendly” the public library is. By becoming acquainted with what it has to offer, the students can become better learners.

The GT students were completing a project on Colonial Life but felt limited by what was on our media center shelves. Continued

Savage Branch Library of the

Howard County Public Library

  • ARTIFACTS

  • Colonial Life Brochure

  • Colonial Life Webpage

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard three2

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Three

  • COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP

  • Connection with the Library Community

    • Candidates employ strategies to ensure connections between the school community and the larger library world of public, academic, special libraries, and information centers.

Reflections

(Continued)

I put together a brochure connecting students, parents and teachers to the resources the public school system and the public county library has to offer. They now have access to the public schools’ World Book Online and SIRS Discoverer and also the public library’s, Primary Search and Grolier’s America the Beautiful. The brochure also directs them how to acquire a library card and search the public library’s PAC.

I added an online component to the brochure. The community can click on links to go directly to the public school system and public library resources. They can also access links to other information centers such as Colonial Williamsburg and the Henry Ford Museum. At the Henry Ford Museum, students can play an online game to learn about the colonial life of the Daggetts. At the Colonial Williamsburg site, students can learn about colonial trades.

Parents, teacher, and students alike appreciated this guidance to additional resources. The webpage was best received by the community although the students thought it was too wordy. Because of this I feel I must simplify it for the next group of students. I was surprised to learn LWES teachers were not aware of all the public library has to offer. I’ve come to realize, I must make a better effort to publicize it as well as other libraries and information centers in our area. I’ve learned I not only have to reach out to the students but to parents and teachers as well so they can connect to all the resources available to become well equipped learners. Back

Laurel Woods Media Center

  • ARTIFACTS

  • Colonial Life Brochure

  • Colonial Life Webpage

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard three3

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Three

  • COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP

  • Instructional Partner

    • Candidates acknowledge the importance of participating on school and district committees and in faculty staff development opportunities.

Reflections

“Be the change you want to see in the world.” – Gandhi

If I feel a change is needed to make a difference for my students, it is up to me to make sure it happens. One way to do this is to team up with like minded professionals and create a change. By participating on school and district committees and in faculty staff development opportunities, I can be instrumental in a change that will make my students more successful.

My service on the Technology Committee, is a means to shape change in my school world. I make sure teachers have the resources they need to meet the needs of the students. The resources may be tangible, such as new digital cameras. I can also share my knowledge in the form of professional development. Teachers need professional development in small ways, such as how to use the new digital camera and in more complex ways, such as how to become expert at an application which will enhance student learning. Continued

  • ARTIFACTS

  • Technology Committee

  • Kidspiration Professional Development Session

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Standard three4

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Three

  • COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP

  • Instructional Partner

    • Candidates acknowledge the importance of participating on school and district committees and in faculty staff development opportunities.

Reflections

(Continued)

At one technology committee meeting, primary teachers were inquiring about ways to use the classroom computer as a learning center. Based on this need, I designed a Kidspiration professional development session. Teachers became successful creators of learning center templates for a variety of subjects. I was also able to share my knowledge of Kidspiration on a district level by presenting this same professional development session at an elementary level conference.

The amazing thing about working with a committee, is that I learn even more than I teach. I become a better teacher as I brainstorm, plan, and implement strategies with a group of colleagues. This is why participating on school and district committees is extremely important for all library media professionals. Back

  • ARTIFACTS

  • Technology Committee

  • Kidspiration Professional Development Session

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard three5

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Three

  • COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP

  • Educational Leader

    • Candidates utilize information found in professional journals to improve library practice.

Reflections

The squeaky wheel gets the grease.

Some may feel the “squeaky wheel” method is the best to get what they want for their library media center. I’ve seen it work before. If someone complains loud enough, the principal grants the person’s wish just to stop the complaints. I had to ask myself, though, is there more to it than this? I want the best for my media center and I know that a great relationship with my principal will improve my library practice, but how should I go about forming this relationship? The answers are just a few clicks away. By accessing professional journals, I can gain knowledge from the experts and the experienced in order to improve my library practice.

When faced with the question of how to form a partnership with my administration to improve my media center program, I went to the experts. I found articles in Knowledge Quest, Teacher Librarian, Library Media Connection, School Libraries Worldwide, and School Library Media Research. In my research I found that being a “squeaky wheel” is not the best way to gain the support of administration. I found that I need to make it a priority to include administrators in the media program, and educate administrators about the program. I must also clear up misconceptions about the role of the media specialist and the media program in increasing the performance of the students they serve. Continued

  • ARTIFACTS

  • Paper: Gaining the Support of Administration

  • Bibliography

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard three6

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Three

  • COLLABORATION AND LEADERSHIP

  • Educational Leader

    • Candidates utilize information found in professional journals to improve library practice.

Reflections

(Continued)

Introducing myself to these professional journals was critical in improving my library practice. I implemented many of the strategies I learned through my journal reading. My principal visits my classroom on a regular basis and we meet at least once a month to discuss the needs of the school. Because I promote my media program to her, she is aware of the role I play in student achievement. My first year on the job, she thanked me for my efforts by providing me with school funds to order more resources for the library. By the end of the year I felt I forged a good bond with the administration thanks to what I learned from profession journals

I have now taken the next step in continuing to improve my library practice by subscribing to one of the journals and regularly accessing the online journals. I have learned that in order to advocate for my program, I need to keep up to date on issues concerning my media program. If someone asks me a question about the program, I need to be able to answer it in a scholarly way right away or at least be able to access information from professional sources in order to answer it. Also, because I don’t always have the time to collaborate with other media specialists, reading journals will help me learn more about how an exemplary media program is designed from other experienced library media specialists. Back

  • ARTIFACTS

  • Paper: Gaining the Support of Administration

  • Bibliography

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Standard four

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Standard Four

Program Administration

  • Standard 4 Overview

  • “School library media candidates administer the library media program in order to

  • support the mission of the school, and according to the principles of best practice

  • in library science and program administration.”From Overview of ALA/AASL Standards for School Library Media Specialist Preparation

  • Related Objectives to Standard 4

  • Click on the links below to navigate to the different objectives with their related artifacts and reflection statements:

  • Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, Using

  • Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical

  • Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment

|| Opening Page || Table of Contents || Standard 1 || Standard 2 || Standard 3 || Standard 4 ||


Standard four1

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Curriculum Integration

Standard Four

  • PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

  • Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, and Using

    • Candidates select, analyze, and evaluate print, non-print and electronic resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop a quality collection designed to meet diverse curricular and personal need.

Reflections

It is extremely important for the media center collection to include a wide variety of resources to support the wide range of curricular topics as well as the personal needs of its users. The media specialist is not expected to be an expert on all curricular areas so it is imperative that she uses professional selection sources and stringent evaluation criteria to supply the media center with these resources.

When asked to provide a list of resources to integrate literature with genetic engineering, I was initially stymied. My first step was to consult the county curriculum guide. After seeing the basic objectives, I felt it was not only important to find non-fiction resources to support the curriculum, but it was also important to provide students with fictional works which would spark their interest in the topic. My next step was to consult professional selection sources.

I began my search by using Novelist to find a list of books on the topic. I used Books in Print.com to narrow my list of books to only those with positive reviews from selection sources such as Voice of Youth Advocates, School Library Journal and Booklist. I was able to find 3 high quality and high interest fiction titles and one appropriate non-fiction title. Finally came the more difficult search for magazines, non-print and electronic resources. Continued

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Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

Curriculum Integration

Standard Four

  • PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

  • Managing Information Resources: Selecting, Organizing, and Using

    • Candidates select, analyze, and evaluate print, non-print and electronic resources using professional selection tools and evaluation criteria to develop a quality collection designed to meet diverse curricular and personal need.

Reflections

(Continued)

I first consulted the search engines Google and Yahooligans as well as the website Amazon.com to find non-print media to support the topic of genetic engineering. I found several websites, songs, and movies on the topic, however, I needed to evaluate the media to determine whether it was high quality and appropriate for high school students. I then consulted Howard County’s Selection Criteria for Library Media Center Materials and was able to identify videos, websites, a radio program, and a song that proved appropriate and capable of sparking the interests of students. At the conclusion of this process, I was able to provide a quality collection of resources to enhance the genetics unit.

When challenged with finding quality resources, not all curriculum topics will be as daunting as genetic engineering, but the process will always be the same. The use of professional selection tools and a precise evaluation criteria is essential to developing a quality media collection that will not only meet the needs of a diverse curriculum and but also appeal to and inspire the learner. Back

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Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

LWES Media Handbook

Standard Four

  • PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

  • Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical

    • Candidates develop and evaluate policies and procedures that support the mission of the school and address specific needs of the library media program, such as collection development and maintenance, challenged materials and acceptable use policies.

Reflections

Laurel Woods Elementary School, through excellence in teaching and learning, develops productive and responsible scholars and citizens, who appreciate diversity and commonality in a positive and challenging environment. Laurel Woods accelerates achievement of all students and encourages enthusiasm for a lifetime of learning.

-LWES School Improvement Mission Statement <http://lwes.hcpss.org/>

The Laurel Woods Elementary Media Center Handbook explains the policies, procedures, and organizational structure of a media program which supports the mission of the school. In order for our students to become lifetime learners, they must have available to them a collection of relevant and up-to-date resources that support the curriculum and inspire a love of reading and a passion to pursue knowledge. Students must have free and open access to print, non-print and electronic media in order to become productive and responsible students who appreciate diversity.

Collection development policies state that “new materials are added to the collection to meet curricular needs and student interest.” Included also are policies in maintaining a collection “at peak quality and usefulness.” The collection is to be assessed at least once a year so that worn-out , out-of-date, and unused materials are removed. Continued

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Standard four4

Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACT

LWES Media Handbook

Standard Four

  • PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

  • Managing Program Resources: Human, Financial, Physical

    • Candidates develop and evaluate policies and procedures that support the mission of the school and address specific needs of the library media program, such as collection development and maintenance, challenged materials and acceptable use policies.

Reflections

Next, the collection must meet the needs of all of its users, therefore, it is important for the materials to match the diversity of the school. Laurel Woods strives to conform to the Library Bill of Rights. Because of this, it is crucial to include a policy on challenged materials. The appropriateness of the materials in the library must not be judged by any one person. Certain reevaluation procedures are set forth when a particular piece of media is challenged by an individual. Decisions of removal of titles are not decided by individuals, but by a district level reevaluation committee comprised of students, teachers, parents, supervisors, and other community members. The committee represent a variety of cultural, ethnic, and religious views.

Finally, flexible circulation procedures will allow students to have access to materials that will help them grow as readers and learners. Laurel Woods is a walking community whose public library is not within walking distance. Students must be able to find what they need at the school media center. Although there are limits on number of books circulated and loan periods, these are flexible. If a student requests a number of books which exceed the limit, I will grant the request. Book renewal is also strongly encouraged. Students also have amble time to check-out books during class as well as before and after school. Most importantly, if a student is unable to find a needed material in the media center, I will try to order the material for him/her. It is my goal to provide all students free and open access to materials so that they will fulfill the school’s mission to become enthusiastic life-long learners. Back

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Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

ARTIFACTS

Library Media Staff Development Survey

User name: lwes

Password: lwes

Results

Standard Four

  • PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

  • Comprehensive and Collaborative Strategic Planning and Assessment

    • Candidates use data for decision-making.

Reflections

“Give a man a fish; you have fed him for today. Teach a man to fish; and you have fed him for a lifetime” –Author Unknown

I am finding as a media specialist I have the power to empower my staff through professional development. Not only does it cut down on my workload, but it also results in teachers who can become information literate and impact their students’ learning. Just as I do with my students, I must assess staff members understanding of certain topics so that I know how I should focus my professional development sessions. I created a survey to assess what topics the staff at Laurel Woods Elementary would like to learn more about. I used the data collected from this survey to plan my professional development sessions. Data showed that most teachers were interested in learning about what is new in the library (67%), and how to use the applications iMovie (67%) and Kidspiration (50%). I then taught primary teachers the basics of using Kidspiration to produce computer learning centers. Also, after receiving new library material, I provided teachers with time to preview and ask questions about the new materials before shelving them. I would like to address the other topics also, but feel with the passage of time, I must reassess them staff first.

I have since learned more about developing surveys. I now plan to assess the comfort level of the participants in regards to the topic. This includes discovering who would be comfortable enough to teach a session. Collecting this data is vital to my decision making and will influence how I plan for professional development for my staff. I’m hoping if I “teach a man to fish”, he will teach others to fish as well.

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Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Overview of ALA/AASL Standards For School Library Media Specialist Preparation. University of Oklahoma. School of Library and Information Studies. 26 Nov. 2008 <www.ou.edu/cas/slis/NewSite/PDFs/SLM/ala-aasl_Standards_OVERVIEW.pdf>.

Back to Standard 1

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Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Overview of ALA/AASL Standards For School Library Media Specialist Preparation. University of Oklahoma. School of Library and Information Studies. 26 Nov. 2008 <www.ou.edu/cas/slis/NewSite/PDFs/SLM/ala-aasl_Standards_OVERVIEW.pdf>.

Back to Standard 2

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Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Overview of ALA/AASL Standards For School Library Media Specialist Preparation. University of Oklahoma. School of Library and Information Studies. 26 Nov. 2008 <www.ou.edu/cas/slis/NewSite/PDFs/SLM/ala-aasl_Standards_OVERVIEW.pdf>.

Back to Standard 3

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Krista McCormick’s Portfolio

Overview of ALA/AASL Standards For School Library Media Specialist Preparation. University of Oklahoma. School of Library and Information Studies. 26 Nov. 2008 <www.ou.edu/cas/slis/NewSite/PDFs/SLM/ala-aasl_Standards_OVERVIEW.pdf>.

Back to Standard 4

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