looking ahead programmes and priorities for mental health europe in 2013
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Looking ahead – programmes and priorities for Mental Health Europe in 2013. Silvana Enculescu – MHE Information and Communications Manager Presentation in SMES-Europa Conference ROME 8/3/2013. Who are we?. Mental Health Europe is a European non-governmental organisation committed to:

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looking ahead programmes and priorities for mental health europe in 2013

Looking ahead – programmes and priorities for Mental Health Europe in 2013

Silvana Enculescu – MHE Information and Communications Manager

Presentation in SMES-Europa Conference ROME 8/3/2013

who are we
Who are we?

Mental Health Europe is a European non-governmental organisation committed to:

  • the promotion of positive mental health and well-being
  • the prevention of mental distress
  • the improvement of care
  • advocacy for social inclusion
  • the protection of human rights for people with mental health problems, their families and carers
what do we do
What do we do?
  • Lobby the European institutions to raise the profile of mental health and well-being on the European agenda
  • Mainstream mental health and well-being in Europeanpolicies, togetherwithotherNGOs
  • Developpolicyrecommendations, sometimesthroughEuropeanprojects
  • Acts as a platform for exchange and collaborationamongEuropeanhealth and social NGOs
  • Represent the interests of itsmembers and supports themwith information on Europeanpolicy and legaldevelopments
  • Develop communication materials: newsletters, websites, leaflets, press releases, position papers, articles and documentaries
why do we work
Why do we work?

- 1 in 4 Europeans will develop mental health problems during the course of their lives

- (ex) users of mental health services were found to be the most discriminated and stigmatized of all disabled people

- (ex) users of mental health services to have a lower life expectancy and more chronic health conditions than the general population.

- many people with mental health conditions do not receive mental health care despite the availability of effective treatments. Between a third and half of people with serious mental health problems in developed countries, and 76% to 85% of those in developing countries had received no care during the year before the study was conducted

- the employment gap between people with mental health problems and average EU citizens is 10-15% in the case of mild or moderate mental health problems, and 30% for people who experience severe symptoms; the average income is 10-40% lower than that of regular citizens, placing the former at a much higher risk of poverty

- the economic consequences of mental health problems are estimated at an average of 3-4% of EU’s gross national product. Moreover, mental health problems account for almost 40% of years lived with disability

- people with mental health problems are 2.5 times more prone to becoming victims of violence

effects of the financial crisis
Effects of the financial crisis

- for each 1% rise in the unemployment rate, there is a 0.8% rise in the rate of suicides

- 41 % of young people not in work, education or training claimed to have felt suicidal

- almost half of unemployed young people believed  joblessness to have caused them mental health problems such as self-harm, panic attacks or insomnia

- in the United Kingdom, homelessness, which is closely associated with mental health problems, is reported to have risen by 25% since 2009

how do we work
How do we work?
  • Research and dissemination

“Mapping Exclusion”

mapping exclusion
Mapping Exclusion

Mapping Exclusion is the first European report on institutional and community care in the mental health field in Europe. The report consists of a comparative analysis of trends and policy changes in Europe, along with 32 country reports (all European Union countries + Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Moldova and Israel) covering issues that are crucial in the context of community care.

Areas of interest:

  • General overview of long-term mental health care and residential care
  • Availability of personal budgets
  • Current mental health or social care reform strategies
  • Involuntary treatment
  • Guardianship and legal capacity
mapping exclusion1
Mapping Exclusion

Findings:

Institutional provision is dominant in the majority of countries

Investment in the infrastructure of psychiatric hospitals and social care institutions continues in some countries - Often using EU Structural Funds.

Limited availability of personal budgets for people with mental health problems

The majority of countries have plenary substitute decision-making regimes

Involuntary admission and treatment are common in institutions but they are also increasingly widespread in the community

how do we work1
How do we work?

2. Information campaigns and advocacy

Tried and Trusted

tried and trusted
Tried and Trusted

Mental Health Europe is supporting and raising awareness for the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) method.

The IPS method is less focused on the individual’s diagnosis, as research shows no evidence of a relationship between employment outcomes and the individual’s diagnosis, severity of impairment and social skills.

Recent employment history, motivation and self-efficacy are important predictors of work outcomes.

A key IPS features is that the employment specialist is integrated into the community mental health team (CMHT). In practice, this means that the client also has access to psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, social workers, occupational therapists and other care providers. Therefore, all staff within the clinical team collaborate to provide optimal support to address the client’s health and social care needs, including retaining or gaining employment, and other vocational needs.

how do we work2
How do we work?

3. Lobbying and capacity-building

The Social Investment Package

- MHE took part in the Campaign to earmark 20% of the ESF for fighting poverty and social inclusion

- MHE continually trains members on accessing EU funds – at least one capacity-building event takes place every year

MHE will also continue advocating, in order to:

- ensure that mental health is mainstreamed across all SIP dimensions, and that the country – specific recommendations include targeted policy solutions

- enforce measures for labour market integration of people with mental health problems

- promote further dialogue with civil society, and especially with user organisations

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