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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools Webinar. Michigan Department of Education August 26, 2011. Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools. Agenda Brief review of the state statute that is the basis for the state School Reform/Redesign Office (SRRO)

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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools Webinar

Michigan Department of Education

August 26, 2011


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Agenda

    • Brief review of the state statute that is the basis for the state School Reform/Redesign Office (SRRO)

    • Brief review of the state requirements for schools on the Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools (PLA) list

    • Review of the metrics that lead to a school being placed on the PLA list

    • Resources and talking points for staff and the media


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

State Statute Review


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

State law requires identification of lowest achieving schools by September 1 of each year beginning in 2010

List of Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools is developed following federal guidelines approved by the United States Department of Education as required in state law


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

State Requirements and Timeline


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Schools on the list must submit a redesign plan to the state and implement the plan

  • Plans must be approved by the state school reform/redesign officer (SRRO)

  • Schools without approved plans or those not making progress under its plan are subject to further action


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Some elements of the collective bargaining agreements in PLA schools may be modified to implement the redesign plan

  • HB 4628 recently amended the public employment relations Act to prohibit certain subjects from being collectively bargained


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Prohibited subjects of collective bargaining

    • teacher placement or personnel decisions.

    • employer’s performance evaluation system

    • discharge or discipline of an employee

    • classroom observations decisions

    • performance-based method of compensation

    • parental notification of ineffective teachers


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Plans may take effect immediately, but no later than the beginning of the school year after approval

  • Per statute, plans must use 1 of 4 intervention models

    • Transformation

    • Turnaround

    • Restart

    • Closure

  • Plans must include any collective bargaining agreement amendments needed to implement the intervention models


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • If the SRRO disapproves a plan, or if the school does not achieve satisfactory results, the SRRO will:

    • Place the school into the State School Reform/Redesign District (SRRD)

    • Impose one of the four approved intervention models

    • Amend collective bargaining agreement to implement plan

    • SRRO may appoint a chief executive officer (CEO) (for one school or multiple schools)


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • SRRO must approve a redesign plan if it contains all of the required elements of the intervention

  • If SRRO disapproves a redesign plan, the LEA may appeal the disapproval to the Superintendent of Public Instruction (SPI)

  • SPI decision is final


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

Communicating with staff, the local board and the local media


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

Timeline

  • August 26, 2011 Department notification

  • September 8, 2011 1st technical assistance meeting-Lansing Center

  • October 4, 2011 2nd technical assistance meeting-Plan review and revisions – Lansing Center

  • November 28, 2011 Deadline for submission of redesign plan

  • December 7-9, 2011 MDE review of final redesign plan

  • January 9, 2011 Approval, disapproval, or change

  • February 6, 2011 Changes submitted

  • January 9 thru Feb 7 Opportunity to appeal SRO disapproval

  • Jan thru August 2012 Pre Implementation activities on

    approved plans

  • September 1, 2012 MDE notifies identified school communities regarding schools on the 2012- 2013 PLA list


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • What happens if the building does not make sufficient progress?

    • The SRRO recommends that the school be placed in the School Reform/Redesign District (SRRD)

  • Duties and powers of the SRRD are transferred to the Educational Achievement Authority:

    • A statewide public school district

    • Made up of those schools assigned to it by the SRRO or schools that are under a EM


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Opportunity for Technical Assistance

    September 8 and October 4, 2011

    9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

    Banquet Rooms 1-4

    Lansing Center

    Lansing, Michigan

  • Plan to bring a team of 3-4 staff to assist with the development of the plan for turning around the school(s) in your district.


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Department staff will review the timeline, the four redesign models, the redesign template, and issues surrounding the use of existing state and federal funds, and answer your questions

  • Please rvsp by September 1, 2011 with the total number attending from your district to Jill Baynes at: [email protected]


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

Questions??


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Understanding the ranking metric

  • Some of you may have questions about the metric used to identify the schools on the Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools list

  • For those of you that don’t have questions about the metric, we will look forward to seeing you on the 24th

  • For those of you who would like to understand the metric in greater detail, we invite you to remain with us a bit longer for a review of the metrics


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Two Tiers of Persistently Lowest Achieving (PLA) Schools

  • Two tiers of schools

    • Two pools

    • Two lists

    • Two sets of requirements

  • Underlined items were items on which the State had some discretion


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Tier I Pool

  • Defining the pool of schools from which the Tier I list is identified

    • The Tier I pool consists of schools meeting all of the following criteria:

      • At least 30 Full Academic Year students with scores on Mathematics in the most recent two years

      • At least 30 Full Academic Year students with scores on Reading in the most recent two years

      • Eligible to receive Title I funding

      • Receiving Title I funding

      • School is in a phase of School Improvement

        • Identified for Improvement

        • Corrective Action

        • Restructuring

    • 112 total schools are in the Tier I pool

      Note: Tier I is independent of EducationYES!


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Tier I List

  • Identifying schools on the Tier I list

    • Two paths to get onto the Tier I list

      • Path 1—from the Tier I pool

        • Calculate percentile ranks (explained later)

        • School is on the Tier I list if the school percentile rank is less than 5

      • Path 2—from the Tier I pool

        • School is on the Tier I list if it is a secondary school with a graduation rate less than 60% for three years running

    • Results

      • 9total schools on the Tier I list

        • 5 from path 1

        • 4 from path 2


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Tier II Pool

  • Defining the initial pool of schools from which the initial Tier II list is identified

    • The initial Tier II pool consists of schools meeting all of the following criteria:

      • At least 30 Full Academic Year students with scores on Mathematics in the most recent two years

      • At least 30 Full Academic Year students with scores on Reading in the most recent two years

      • Eligible for, but not receiving Title I funding

      • Is a secondary school (serves at least one grade in the range 7-12)

    • 560 total schools are in the Tier II pool

      Note: Tier II is independent of both AYP and EducationYES!


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Tier II List

  • Tier II—Identifying schools on the Tier II list

    • Three paths to get onto the Tier II list

      • Path 1—from the Tier II pool

        • Calculate percentile ranks (explained later)

        • School is on Tier II list if school percentile rank is less than 5

      • Path 2—from the Tier II pool

        • School is on Tier II list if it is a secondary school with a graduation rate less than 60% for three years running

      • Path 3—from the Tier I pool

        • School is on Tier II list if it ranks lower than or equal to (on a statewide ranking of all schools) the highest ranked school that got onto the Tier II list through path 1

    • Results

      • 89 total schools on the Tier II List

        • 29 through path 1

        • 0 through path 2

        • 60 through path 3


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Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools by Tier

  • Tier I List9

  • Tier II List89

    Total98


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Calculating Percentile Ranks

  • Details and schematic in the next slide

  • Incorporate both mathematics and reading

  • Incorporate both achievement level and improvement rates, weighting achievement more heavily than improvement

  • Level the playing field across

    • High schools versus Elementary/Middle schools

    • Reading versus Mathematics


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Start with raw data

% proficient

% improving minus % declining (MEAP)

% improvement trend slope (MME)


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Calculate z-scores

Z-scores are a statistical method used

to level the playing field between…

ELA and Math

Elementary/Middle and High schools

Achievement and Improvement

Positive z-scores show how many

standard deviations (SD) above the

pool average the school is

Negative z-scores show how many

standard deviations (SD) below the

pool average the school is


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Calculate a combined

Proficiency/improvement

score and percentile

rank for each…

Subject

(ELA vs. math)

Level of School

(elementary/middle

versus high school)


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Calculate average and

overall percentile rank


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Examples

  • Examples are shown for a high school and for an elementary/middle school in the following slides


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Specific School Data

  • You can see an individual school’s data in the schematic format by clicking on


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PLA Statewide Ranking

  • The Federal regulations require comparing schools from the Tier I and Tier II pools.

  • However, the Tier I and Tier II pools are non-overlapping

  • Therefore, a PLA ranking of schools was also calculated.

  • Some schools did not receive a PLA ranking because they tested fewer than 30 students in…

    • Reading and/or Mathematics in…

    • School years 2008-09 and/or 2009-10.

  • This PLA percentile ranking was calculated using the same methods as for the Tier I and Tier II pools.

August 26, 2011


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Creating the PLA Statewide list

  • Start with all schools that tested at least 30 full academic year students in both reading and mathematics in the most recent two years

  • Then, rank the schools top to bottom

  • Each gray bar (to the left) represents a single school

  • This is the PLA Statewide Ranking (in 2010-2011, used only to identify PLA schools).

August 26, 2011


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Creating the PLA Statewide List

  • Your school might be anywhere on this statewide list.

August 26, 2011


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Federally Approved Requirements for Identify-ing Persistently Lowest Achieving Schools

  • Therefore pools of schools that are eligible to become part of the Tier I list or Tier II list of PLA schools are subsets of the top to bottom list.

August 26, 2011


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Identifying the Tier I Pool

  • Next, identify the subset of schools in the Tier I pool

  • Schools in the Tier I pool meet all of the following conditions

    • They receive Title I funding

    • They are in corrective action, restructuring, or improvement (have not made AYP for at least two years in a row)

  • Shown in pink

  • This is the pool of schools from which the Tier I list is identified

August 26, 2011


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Creating the Tier I List

  • Next, identify the lowest achieving 5% of the Tier I pool

  • These are the schools in the Tier I list of PLA schools that fall under the responsibility of the State School Reform and Redesign Officer (SRRO)

  • Shown in bright red

  • Note also that any high school in the Tier I pool with a graduation rate of less than 60% for three years running also becomes part of the Tier I list (not shown in the schematic)

August 26, 2011


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Identifying the Tier II Pool

  • Next, identify the subset of schools in the Tier II pool

  • Schools in the Tier II pool meet all of the following conditions

    • They are eligible to receive, but do not receive, Title I funding

    • They are secondary schools (meaning they instruct students in any grade in the range 7-12)

  • Shown in light blue

  • This is the pool of schools from which the initial Tier II list is identified

August 26, 2011


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Creating the Tier II List

  • Next, identify the lowest performing 5% of schools in the Tier II pool

  • This is the initial Tier II list of PLA schools. These schools are under the responsibility of the SRRO

  • Shown in bright blue

  • Note also that any high school in the Tier II pool with a graduation rate of less than 60% for three years running also becomes part of the Tier II list (not shown in the schematic)

August 26, 2011


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Creating the Tier II List

  • Finally, identify any schools from the Tier I pool that did not qualify for the Tier I list, but whose ranking was lower than the highest ranking school in the initial Tier II list

  • These are schools in pink lower than the highest school in bright blue

August 26, 2011


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Creating the Tier II List

  • Finally, identify any schools from the Tier I pool that did not qualify for the Tier I list, but whose ranking was lower than the highest ranking school in the initial Tier II list

  • These are schools in pink lower than the highest school in bright blue

  • Switch these schools to bright blue

  • This is the rest of the Tier II list of PLA schools. These schools are also under the responsibility of the SRRO

August 26, 2011


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Other Low Achieving Schools

  • Note that because of the way the Tier I pool and Tier II pool are defined in Federal guidelines, it is possible for a low achieving school to not be on either the Tier I list or Tier II list of PLA Schools

  • These are the schools in gray whose performance is lower than the highest school in bright red or bright blue.

  • These schools are not under the responsibility of the SRRO


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How Can a Low Achieving School Not Show Up on the PLA Schools List?

Based on federally approved requirements, this depends on the school’s AYP status, whether the school receives or is eligible to receive Title I funding, and whether the school is a secondary school:

Some low achieving schools may not be eligible to be considered a PLA School because of the way the pools were defined in federal requirements

August 26, 2011


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Top to Bottom Ranking

  • MDE will publish a separate Top to Bottom Ranking of all schools, using our preferred methodology.

  • To view this ranking, go to http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-37818_56562---,00.html

  • The PLA statewide ranking is produced only in order to implement the federal rules for identifying PLA schools.


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Contact Information

For Persi

  • Deborah Clemmons

    State School Reform Office

    [email protected]

  • Jill Baynes

    Department Analyst

    517-335-2741

August 26, 2011


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Contact Information

For Questions Regarding Data or Metrics:

  • Joseph Martineau, Ph.D.

    Executive Director, Bureau of Assessment and Accountability

    [email protected]

  • Venessa Keesler, Ph.D.

    Manager, Evaluation, Research and Accountability

    [email protected]

    517-373-1342

August 26, 2011


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