Ap world periodization
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 35

AP World: Periodization PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 402 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

AP World: Periodization. Why do we periodize history?. Warm Up: Break your life up into 3-5 time periods. Name the periods and write an explanation why this breakdown makes sense. . Periodization.

Download Presentation

AP World: Periodization

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Ap world periodization

AP World: Periodization


Why do we periodize history

Why do we periodize history?

  • Warm Up: Break your life up into 3-5 time periods. Name the periods and write an explanation why this breakdown makes sense.


Periodization

Periodization

  • Periodizationis the attempt to categorize or divide time into clearly labeled chunks

  • It is done to make the passage of time seem more understandable.

  • However, It can be very controversial…


Controversial periodization

Controversial Periodization

  • BC/AD(anno Domini-Latin for “in the year of our Lord)vs. BCE/CE:

  • Middle Ages/Dark Ages/Renaissance

  • The Modern era (after 1450)? Pre-modern (before 1450)?

  • Despite it’s controversy, periodization is a useful tool. (It helps us imagine history.)


  • Ap periodization

    AP Periodization

    PERIOD 1: Foundations

    • 8000 B.C.E. – 500 B.C.E.

      PERIOD 2: Classical Era

    • 500 B.C.E. – 500 C.E.

      PERIOD 3: Post-Classical Era

    • 500 – 1450

      PERIOD 4: The Origins of Global Interdependence

    • 1450 – 1750

      PERIOD 5: The Age of Revolutions, Industry and Empire

    • 1750 – 1914

      PERIOD 6: The 20thCentury

    • 1914 - Present


    Periods issues and details

    Periods, Issues, and Details…

    • Periods you should be aware of

      • Foundations or “Prehistory”

        • Paleolithic: 2.5 million BCE-10,000 BCE (early humans)

        • Neolithic: 8,000 BCE-3500BCE (Agricultural Revolution)

        • Bronze Age: 3500BCE-1100BCE (River Valley civilizations)

      • Classical Period

        • 500BCE-500CE - Rome, Greece, Han China, Maurya/Gupta India, Birth of Islam

      • The Post-Classical Period – What does that mean?

        • 500CE-1450CE

        • Asian/African Period?- Muslim Empires, Sui/Tang/Song Dynasties, Mongols

        • European Period? - “Dark” Ages, Feudalism, Crusades


    Some other issues

    Some Other Issues…

    • Global Interdependence: European Rise

      • 1450CE-1750CE - Renaissance, Columbus, Americas, Exploration, Absolute Leaders, Colonialism, Scientific Revolution

    • Industry and Revolutions:

      • 1750CE-1914CE- Industrial Rev, Imperialism, Revolutions, Independence Movements, Modernization

    • 20th Century: A Turbulent Century

      • 1914CE-2007CE- World Wars 1&2, the Holocaust, The Cold War, The UN, The War on Terror, End of Colonies…etc


    Ap periodization1

    AP Periodization

    PERIOD 1: Foundations

    • 8000 B.C.E. – 500 B.C.E.

      PERIOD 2: Classical Era

    • 500 B.C.E. – 500 C.E.

      PERIOD 3: Post-Classical Era

    • 500 – 1450

      PERIOD 4: The Origins of Global Interdependence

    • 1450 – 1750

      PERIOD 5: The Age of Revolutions, Industry and Empire

    • 1750 – 1914

      PERIOD 6: The 20thCentury

    • 1914 - Present


    Why the ap periodization

    Why the AP Periodization?

    PERIOD 1: Foundations

    • 8000 B.C.E. – 500 B.C.E.

      WHY IS 8000 B.C.E. a pivotal year?


    Why the ap periodization1

    Why the AP Periodization?

    PERIOD 2: Classical Era

    • 500 B.C.E. – 500 C.E.

      WHY IS 500 C.E. a pivotal year?


    Why the ap periodization2

    Why the AP Periodization?

    PERIOD 3: Post-Classical Era

    • 500 – 1450

      WHY IS 1450 a pivotal year?


    What about webs

    What about webs?

    • Discuss with a partner:

    • What is a web?

    • What are the 3 stages of the Human Web since 6000 years ago?


    The 3 stages of the human web

    The 3 Stages of the Human Web:

    1. Metropolitan Web: 6000 yrs. ago – The development of city-centers, crossroads for information, goods, and infections

    2. Old World Web: 2000 yrs. ago - The joining of many smaller metropolitan webs of North Africa and Eurasia

    3. Cosmopolitan Web: 500 yrs. ago – Oceanic navigation uniting the world’s metropolitan webs… becoming increasingly more connected with technology


    Still wondering

    Still wondering…

    1. How would J.R. McNeill define the period before the first metropolitan web began in Sumer?

    2. Which system of periodization do you find more sensible and useful: the AP periodization or the Human Web ?

    3. Are there other ways to periodize history?


    How else can history be broken down

    How else can history be broken down?


    Ap periodization2

    AP Periodization

    PERIOD 1: BEER

    • 8000 B.C.E. – 500 B.C.E.

      PERIOD 2: WINE

    • 500 B.C.E. – 500 C.E.

      PERIOD 3: SPIRITS

    • 500 – 1450

      PERIOD 4: COFFEE

    • 1450 – 1750

      PERIOD 5: TEA

    • 1750 – 1914

      PERIOD 6: COCA-COLA

    • 1914 - Present


    Ap world periodization

    Beer

    • The ancient Sumerians, who built advanced city-states in the Mesopotamia, began fermenting beer at least 6,000 years ago.

    • "When people started agriculture the first crops they produced were barley or wheat. You consume those crops as bread and as beer”


    Beer in ancient egypt

    Beer in Ancient Egypt


    Beer in ancient egypt1

    Beer in Ancient Egypt


    Ap world periodization

    Wine

    • "Once you had regions like Greece and Rome that could distinguish themselves as making good wine, it gave them an economic boost…”

    • The expense of producing wine helped the beverage quickly gain more status than beer. Wine was originally associated with social elites and religious activities.

    • The quest for quality became an economic engine and later drove cultural expansion.


    Wine in ancient greece

    Wine in Ancient Greece


    Spirits

    Spirits

    • Hard liquor, particularly brandy and rum, pleased sailors during the long sea voyages of the Age of Exploration in the 1400s until the 1600s

    • Rum played a crucial part of the triangular trade between Britain, Africa, and the North American colonies that once dominated the Atlantic economy.

    • “Rum also reduced illness and scurvy disease. Sailing physicians thought that this had doubled the efficiency of the fleet."


    Rum and triangular trade

    Rum and Triangular Trade


    Coffee

    Coffee

    • "In the Arab world coffee rose as an alternative to alcohol, and coffeehouses as alternatives to taverns—both of which are banned by Islam,"

    • "Just at the point when the Enlightenment is getting going, here's a drink that sharpens the mind…The coffeehouse is the perfect venue to get together and exchange ideas and information. The French Revolution started in a coffeehouse."


    Coffee in the arab world

    Coffee in the Arab World


    Enough coffee

    Enough Coffee?


    Ap world periodization

    Tea

    • Tea became a daily drink in China around the third century A.D.

    • "Englishmen around the world could drink tea, whether they were a colonial administrator in India or a London businessman… The sun never set on the British Empire—which meant that it was always teatime somewhere."

    • As the Industrial Revolution of 18th and 19th centuries grew, factory workers stayed alert during long, monotonous shifts thanks to welcome tea breaks.


    Tea plantations in india

    Tea Plantations in India


    Coca cola

    Coca-Cola

    • In 1886 pharmacist John Stith Pemberton sold about nine Coca-Colas a day.

    • While Coke may not always produce a smile, a survey by the Economist suggests that the soft drink's presence is a great indicator of happy citizens. When countries were polled for happiness, as defined by a United Nations index, high scores correlated with sales of Coca-Cola.


    Coca cola advertising

    Coca-Cola Advertising


    Everybody everything loves coke

    Everybody/Everything loves Coke


    Even buildings

    Even buildings…


  • Login