Key questions for surveys and benchmark data
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Key questions for surveys and benchmark data. 13 June 2012 | Paul Roberts. Paul Roberts Managing Director, Ibis Communication and co-founder of ICEmarq ™. Some observations. Measurement is often acknowledged as important, but it’s not necessarily prioritised

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Key questions for surveys and benchmark data

Key questions for surveys and benchmark data

13 June 2012 | Paul Roberts


Paul roberts managing director ibis communication and co founder of icemarq

Paul RobertsManaging Director, Ibis Communication and co-founder of ICEmarq™


Some observations

Some observations

  • Measurement is often acknowledged as important, but it’s not necessarily prioritised

  • High level questions about communication are often included in annual staff surveys – that are run by HR

  • Time and budget are perennial barriers, though often this is more about perception than fact

  • Uncertainty about what, how and when to measure


Who s done what and why

Who’s done what (and why)?

  • Demonstrate value

  • Force decisions about what is vital

Some popular reasons why:

Planning

  • Assess progress

  • Deploy resources where needed most

Assessment


What you might measure

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

Behaviours

Links communications to ends not means

IC doesn’t own behaviours or control all relevant factors


What you might measure1

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

General perceptions

Perception is reality!

Can be too high level to be genuinely useful

[Organisation] provides sufficient opportunity for two-way communication in

This feels lukewarm, can we unpack this?

46


What you might measure2

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

Messages or campaigns

Focuses very clearly on outcomes

Clarity and connection?

I can explain what [the values] are.

Okay, but do they understand and support the values?

61


What you might measure3

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

Line manager / leadership communication

Face to face is key

IC can’t fully own this interaction

Team meetings in my area are generally worthwhile.

How much leverage does IC have here?

19

21


What you might measure4

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

Channel usage

Proof of the pudding is in the eating!

Usage doesn’t equate to benefit

Usage is up!

Everyone loves a green arrow that points up. But is it always good?


What you might measure5

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

Channel value or perception

Yields useful feedback to help you develop a channel

Risks missing the bigger picture

It is important to have a regular printed magazine or newsletter.

This is double the figure for staff! Why does this matter more to leaders? Is this really that key?

33


What you might measure6

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

Readiness

Helps you plan the roll out of new interactive channels

May not equate to actual behaviour

… please state the extent to which you believe having social features like these internally offer potential for improving the way we communicate and collaborate.

c40% see significant value, yet many organisations struggle to obtain a similar adoption rate

36


What you might measure7

Whatyou might measure

Possible issues

Area

Benefits

Preferences

Helps you plan future communication priorities

May not equate to actual behaviour

An industrial workforce

A mainly white-collar workforce

33

56

But did they actually read things?


How you might measure

How you might measure

Possible issues

Approach

Benefits

Surveys

Focus groups and interviews

Analytics

  • Increasingly easier to run

  • Many ways to sample an audience

  • Great for building indicators

  • Easy to grasp headline results

  • Great for uncovering drivers

  • Great for surprising you!

  • A chance to test your ideas too

  • Based on behaviours not opinion

  • Increasingly easier to get reports

  • Can be tuned to look at outcomes

  • Survey fatigue

  • Poor at uncovering drivers

  • Pressure to game the results

  • Time and resource intensive

  • Vulnerable to topic hi-jacking

  • Can generate expectations

  • Almost impossible to retro-fit

  • Can be hard to see real success

  • Pressure to focus on traffic


Some basic rules

Some basic rules

  • Only measure what you can influence

  • Build quantitative and qualitative research into your measurement programme

  • Measure at intervals that allow you enough time to change course

  • With quantitative data, focus on top and bottom box scores when analysing results

  • Approach your programme from the perspective of your audience


About icemarq

About ICEmarq™

The data contained in this presentation comes from ICEmarq™ which is a new internal communication measurement service co-founded by Paul Roberts and Alan Richardson.

You can find out more about it at www.icemarq.com or call 0203 1707 085 for more information. Paul or Alan are also very happy to set up a demo for anyone interested.


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