Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 51

Presented by Matthew Chatterton & David Axford January 2007 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 79 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Presented by Matthew Chatterton & David Axford January 2007. Socia 2006 Business Partnerships Survey. Contents. Methodology. Profile of participants and the market. Making partnerships work. Cultural fit. Sharing and maintaining control. Initiatives, capabilities & advice. Partnership.

Download Presentation

Presented by Matthew Chatterton & David Axford January 2007

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Presented by Matthew Chatterton & David Axford

January 2007

Socia

2006 Business Partnerships Survey


Contents

Contents

Methodology

Profile of participants and the market

Making partnerships work

Cultural fit

Sharing and maintaining control

Initiatives, capabilities & advice

Partnership

Summary


Methodology

Methodology

  • A total of 92 telephone interviews conducted by Ipsos MORI

    • All participants personally involved in establishing/ managing a long term collaborative business partnership

    • All large public/private sector organisations

  • Coverage

    • 51 public and 41 private sector companies surveyed

  • Outputs

    • Topline data; verbatim listings; presentation of findings; PR support

  • Fieldwork: 2 November – 22 December 2006


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Profile of participants

& the market


List of participating organisations 1

List of participating organisations (1)


List of participating organisations 2

List of participating organisations (2)


Sector splits and job functions

Sector splits and job functions

Transport

Retail/finance

Central government

Health/NHS

IT/technology

Local government

Construction

55% PUBLIC SECTOR

45% PRIVATE SECTOR

Job functions

  • 17% FDs - 14% HR/personnel directors

  • 22% IT/tech directors- 47% ‘other’ directors (incl. CEO, operations, planning)

Base: All (92)


A significant minority 1 3 have over 20 ongoing partnerships

A significant minority (1/3) have over 20 ongoing partnerships

Q4Approximately how many partnerships is your organisation in at the moment?

None

1 - 5

6 - 10

11 - 15

16 - 20

Over 20

Don’t know

Mean = 12.7 partnerships

Base: All (92)


Two thirds expect partnership activity to increase

Two-thirds expect partnership activity to increase

Q5Do you think that the amount of partnership activity your organisation is involved in is likely to increase or decrease over the next five years or will it stay the same?

67% INCREASE

Increase substantially

Increase a little

Stay the same

Decrease a little

Decrease substantially

Don’t know

Base: All (92)


Collaborative partnerships seen as key to current and future success

Collaborative partnerships seen as key to current and future success

Q2How important do you feel collaborative partnerships are to the success of your organisation?

Q3And how important do you feel they will be to the success of your organisation in five years’ time?

Not very important

Fairly important

Not at all important

Very important

Essential

Not important

Important

Now

85%

5 years time

91%

Base: All (92)


The average partnership is around 5 years long

The average partnership is around 5 years long

Q6We realise that this may vary quite widely, but what is the average length of your organisation’s current or proposed collaborative relationships?

Under 3 years

4 – 6 years

7 – 10 years

11 or more years

Don’t know

Mean = 5.8 years

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Making partnerships work


Having a common purpose and shared objectives seen as the main success factor

Having a common purpose and shared objectives seen as the main success factor

Q7What would you say are the most important factors in building successful partnership between two organisations? TOP 10 MENTIONS

A common purpose & mutual/shared objectives

Good understanding and acceptance of each other’s culture

Good personal relationships

Trust/openness/honesty

Effective communication systems

The right contract and performance measures

A willingness at all levels to solve problems together

Clear accountabilities

Cost/value for money

Clear decision-making authorities

Base: All (92)


The greatest overall focus has been on governance and operations

The greatest overall focus has been on governance and operations….

Q8Thinking about the partnerships you have been involved in, typically how much effort has been focused on each of the following general areas….?

(a) Governance (by which I mean contracts, decision-making and control)

(b) Operations (that is, management information, service levels and learning)

(c) Behaviours (such as leadership, problem solving, cultural compatibility)

Not applicable

None at all

Just a little

Fair amount

A great deal

Governance

89%

Operations

93%

Behaviours

64%

Base: All (92)


But behaviours is recognised by most as offering the greatest additional value

…but behaviours is recognised by most as offering the greatest additional value

Q9Thinking about these three elements of collaborative partnerships - governance, operations and behaviour – in which ONE do you think organisations could realise the greatest additional value by focusing more closely on it?

Governance

Operations

Behaviours

Don’t know

Base: All (92)


Shared values seen as underpinning successful governance

Shared values seen as underpinning successful governance

Q10aWhat specific aspects of governance should organisations focus on?

MOST FREQUENT MENTIONS

  • Ensure values are appreciated/shared (36% or 5 mentions)

  • Better focus on objectives (29% or 4 mentions)

  • Building relationships/partnerships (21% or 3 mentions)

  • Mutual understanding (21% or 3 mentions)

Mutual values to ensure shared values are appreciated.. secondly [that] the right people are in place with the right skills…and thirdly, openness

[Local government]

Have a well-established set of requirements before entering into an agreement. They should be managed throughout the agreement and moderated as required

[Construction]

Base: All mentioning governance as element where organisations could realise greatest additional value (14)


Continued and consistent focus on objectives needed for operations to work properly

Continued and consistent focus on objectives needed for operations to work properly

Q10bWhat specific aspects of operations should organisations focus on?

MOST FREQUENT MENTIONS

  • Better focussing on objectives (30% or 8 mentions)

  • Building relationships/partnerships (22% or 6 mentions)

  • Mutual understanding (19% or 5 mentions)

  • Good communication (15% or 4 mentions)

Understanding them better – it’s very broad and depends on the client. Focus on cost efficiency and better ways of doing things

[Finance]

The partnership is over a long period of time. It is very easy for the focus to slip – one starts with good intentions but you must keep focussed throughout the duration

[Central government]

Base: All mentioning operations as element where organisations could realise greatest additional value (27)


Building relationships seen as demanding but vital to success

Building relationships seen as demanding but vital to success

Q10cWhat specific aspects of behaviours should organisations focus on?

MOST FREQUENT MENTIONS

  • Building relationships/partnerships (56%)

  • Mutual understanding (35%)

  • Good communication (17%)

  • Ensure values are appreciated/shared (15%)

By looking at the rewards and benefits and minimising the pain

[Construction]

It’s really quite bog-standard stuff, like values and keeping promises, along with openness and integrity…also the ability to acknowledge when you have done something wrong and work to fix it

[IT/technology]

It comes back to leadership and clarity of purpose

[Local government]

Base: All mentioning behaviours as element where organisations could realise greatest additional value (48)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Cultural Fit


Cultural fit is significant part of selection criteria for most

Cultural fit is significant part of selection criteria for most

Q12When selecting an organisation to partner with, how significant is the fit between their culture and the culture of your own organisation, as part of the selection criteria?

85% SIGNIFICANT

Very significant

Fairly significant

Not very significant

Not significant at all

Not applicable

Base: All (92)


A range of hard and soft analysis undertaken to test cultural fit

A range of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ analysis undertaken to test cultural fit

Q13How do you analyse the cultural fit of a potential partner?

Understanding them/their culture

Communication/general conversations/face-to-face meetings

Analyse the partner by how experienced they are

Look into their history/track record

What their values are

Analyse the partner by looking at their attitudes

Amount of effort they’re willing to spend on relationship

Policies

Size of the company

Other

Don’t know

Base: All who think cultural fit is very/fairly significant part of selection criteria (78)


In their own words

In their own words

Q13How do you analyse the cultural fit of a potential partner?

Illustrative verbatim comments

Face to face meetings, understanding their ethos

[Transport]

Partly by researching and ensuring the information is sound and then taking the time to consider the partner’s historical track record and experience….and if necessary engage with third party assistance

[Local government]

Looking at their methods…at whether they have worked in our industry…Personal empathy [with] people involved

[Finance]

Analysis. The size of the company - but it’s difficult to asses without coming face to face

[Central government]


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Sharing &

Maintaining Control


Two thirds have found handing over control of some operational functions difficult

Two-thirds have found handing over control of some operational functions difficult…

Q14Establishing partnerships often involves giving up some direct control over certain aspects of your operations. How easy or difficult do you think your organisation has typically found the process of giving up control?

Very easy

Fairly easy

Neither/nor

63% DIFFICULT

Fairly difficult

Very difficult

We didn’t give up any direct control

Don’t know

Base: All (92)


And this varies by organisation size and type

…and this varies by organisation size and type

Q14Establishing partnerships often involves giving up some direct control over certain aspects of your operations. How easy or difficult do you think your organisation has typically found the process of giving up control?

Difficult

Easy

All

< 5,000 emps

5,000+ emps

FDs

IT/technology

HR/personnel

Base: All (92); <5,000 employees (51); 5,000+ employees (40); FDs (16); IT/tech (20); HR/personnel (13)


Previous experience and internal cultural help in process of relinquishing some control

Previous experience and internal cultural help in process of relinquishing some control

Q15Why do you think that process is typically easy?

  • We’ve had a good experience/been through this before (5 mentions)

  • It’s a matter of culture (4 mentions)

  • Building trust (1 mention)

We have previous experience….by the time you release control you know the key performance indicators you share….I know by looking at the key performance indicators that things are under control

[Finance]

If you get the relationship established

the right way it’s easy [and have] a clear shared vision of what you want to do

[Central government]

It’s the culture within our business. It’s how people are taught and trained. We want to be in partnerships

[Construction]

Base: All who think process is easy (14)


Difficulties appear to stem from deep seated concerns most of which are rational

Difficulties appear to stem from deep-seated concerns (most of which are rational)

Q15Why do you think that process is typically difficult?

  • Control element/giving up control (48%)

  • It’s a matter of culture (36%)

  • Building trust (7%)

  • Change in management (3%)

[It’s] cultural. One wants to preserve and control, keep perceptions of the brand

[Retail]

The people who run the firm are control freaks! [Finance]

There is accountability for funding and all governments need to know what they are getting

[Central government]

That we don’t have a 100 percent understanding of the process - in other words we are not sure what we are giving up

[Finance]

Base: All who think process is difficult (58)


Hard measures used in nearly all cases but more limited application of softer metrics

‘Hard’ measures used in nearly all cases but more limited application of ‘softer’ metrics

Q16Which, if any, of the following types of performance measures do you have in place to assess the progress of the partnership?

Financial measures

Activity measures

Outcome measures

Relationship measures

Other

Don’t know

Base: All (92)


Nearly all concede that earlier planning helps mitigate later operational issues

Nearly all concede that earlier planning helps mitigate later operational issues

Q11To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement: most problems experienced during the operation of a partnership could have been avoided by more careful planning at the set-up stage

86% AGREE

Strongly agree

Tend to agree

Neither/nor

Tend to disagree

Strongly disagree

Don’t know

Base: All (xx)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Initiatives,

Capabilities & Advice


Meetings workshops and in house training are main initiatives applied

Meetings/workshops and in-house training are main initiatives applied

Q18How, if at all, have you addressed the challenges of collaborative partnerships and built partnering capability? TOP MENTIONS

Regular meetings/seminars/workshops

Offered in-house training to existing staff

Building good relationships

Set up a specialist in-house team to manage partnerships/alliances

Not undertaken any initiatives/ changed practices etc.

Used outside consultants as advisors/coaches

Sent people on external training courses

Base: All (92)


Effective communication and working on the relationship help to prevent blame response

Effective communication and working on the relationship help to prevent ‘blame response’

Q20How have you avoided slipping into a more confrontational approach or adopting a ‘blame response’ when serious issues arise? TOP MENTIONS

Good communication

Having/developing good relationships/partnerships

Focus on what went wrong/learning from mistakes

Having strong governance

Having the right framework in place at the set-up stage

Being open/honest

Being clear/up-front

Have not avoided this/still many issues/problems

Base: All (92)


In their own words1

In their own words

Q20How have you avoided slipping into a more confrontational approach or adopting a ‘blame response’ when serious issues arise?

Illustrative verbatim comments

Good communication and being open about issues. Also being consistent on the ground you can’t give away and being able to compromise on the vast area of middle ground

[IT/technology]

Seriously hard work on both sides

[Central government]

Focus on the facts. Look at alternative perspectives - we’ve bought in a brokering person. [I] think it’s a challenge for the partnership

[Retail]

Have very clear and well- constructed contracts. A good level of communication from the earlier stages

[Construction]


Improved relationship management collaborative leadership capabilities seen as particularly useful

Improved relationship management/collaborative leadership capabilities seen as particularly useful

Q17Organisations require a range of qualities or capabilities in order to partner successfully. Which, if any, of the following qualities/capabilities would you like to have had more access to in setting-up and running a collaborative partnership?

Relationship management

5,000+ emps=73%

Collaborative leadership

Programme management

5,000+ emps=60%

Facilitation and coaching skills

Dispute resolution

Commercial management

Have the necessary qualities

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Developing a deeper understanding and ensuring objectives are truly shared seen as cornerstones of successful partnering

Q21What would be the key pieces of advice that you would give to someone about to take on a role that involved managing a collaborative partnership?

Develop good understanding/sharing objectives/goals/ business

Ensure greater clarity/be more open

Take more time building relationships

Structure governance

Devote more time and effort

Ensure good communication

Ensure accountability is right

Other

Base: All (92)


In their own words2

In their own words

Q21What would be the key pieces of advice that you would give to someone about to take on a role that involved managing a collaborative partnership?

Illustrative verbatim comments

Do a lot of talking

[NHS/Health]

Make sure the foundations are right, basic principles are in place - joint aims/ joint goals

[Central government]

Get as much advice as you can before you start. Ensure both sides have a clear understanding of what to achieve from the partnership

[Central government]

Don’t think it will be easy - treat it like a marriage where you have to work at it to get the long term results and benefits

[Construction]

Work on the relationships and ensure that accountability is right

[IT/technology]


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Partnership


Partnerships are not seen as a passing fad

Partnerships are not seen as a ‘passing fad’

Q19 To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

(a) “Partnerships are a passing fad that won’t have a long term place in the world of work”

Strongly disagree

Strongly agree

Tend to agree

Tend to disagree

92% DISAGREE

Base: All (92)


Over 9 in 10 see partnering as a key management tool for future success

Over 9 in 10 see partnering as a key management tool for future success

Q19 To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

(b) “Partnering will be a key management tool for success in the future”

Strongly disagree

Strongly agree

Tend to agree

Tend to disagree

92% AGREE

Base: All (92)


Most do not see partnerships as a necessary evil which must be endured

Most do not see partnerships as a ‘necessary evil’ which must be endured

Q19 To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

(c) “Partnerships are a necessary evil and we have to learn to live with them”

Strongly disagree

Strongly agree

Tend to agree

Tend to disagree

67% DISAGREE

Base: All (92)


9 in 10 disagree that the benefits of partnerships rarely outweigh the costs

9 in 10 disagree that the benefits of partnerships rarely outweigh the costs

Q19 To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

(d) “The benefits of partnerships rarely outweigh the costs and should be avoided where possible”

Strongly disagree

Strongly agree

Tend to agree

Tend to disagree

90% DISAGREE

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Over 9 in 10 agree that collaboration will be a vital foundation for long term global economic success

Q22To what extent do you agree or disagree that the ability to collaborate with others in different businesses and different cultures will be a vital foundation for long term success in a globalised economy?

1%

Strongly agree

92% AGREE

Tend to agree

Neither/nor

Tend to disagree

Strongly disagree

Don’t know

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Nearly 9 in 10 agree that partnering can transform how well we meet future business and social goals

Q23To what extent do you agree or disagree that partnering and collaboration between organisations has the potential to transform our ability to meet business and social goals in the future?

Strongly agree

88% AGREE

Tend to agree

Neither/nor

Tend to disagree

Strongly disagree

Don’t know

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Extra analysis


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

A common purpose/shared objectives and having close relationships with trust/honest seen as main success factors

Q7What would you say are the most important factors in building successful partnership between two organisations? TOP 10 MENTIONS

A common purpose & mutual/shared objectives

Good personal relationships/trust/openness/honesty (combined)

Good understanding and acceptance of each other’s culture

Effective communication systems

The right contract and performance measures

A willingness at all levels to solve problems together

Clear accountabilities

Cost/value for money

Clear decision-making authorities

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

No significant differences in actual implementation of performance measures (eg relationship measures)

Q16Which, if any, of the following types of performance measures do you have in place to assess the progress of the partnership?

Financial measures

Activity measures

Outcome measures

Relationship measures

All respondents

Other

Mention “good personal relationships” *

Do not mention “good personal relationships” *

Don’t know

* Q7 ‘Good personal relationships’ as one of) the most important factors in building a successful partnership (spontaneous)

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

A slightly higher proportion of those saying giving up control was ‘easy’ do not see partnerships as a ‘necessary evil’ to be endured

Q19 To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

(c) “Partnerships are a necessary evil and we have to learn to live with them”

Strongly disagree

Strongly agree

Tend to agree

Tend to disagree

All respondents

Those who found giving up control ‘easy’ *

Those who found giving up control ‘difficult’ *

* Q14 How easy or difficult has your organisation typically found the process of giving up control?

Base: All (92)


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Summary


Summary 1

Summary (1)

  • Collaborative partnerships seen as “essential/very important” to their success by around 9 in 10 organisations (now and in the future)

  • A third have 20+ ongoing partnerships at the moment

    • Two-thirds expect an increase in partnership activity

  • More effort is focussed on governance and operations than behaviours

    • But behaviours seen as offering the best way to add value

  • 85% say cultural fit is a “significant” part of their selection criteria

  • Two-thirds have found giving up control “difficult”

    BUT most have performance measures in place (except relationship measures)

    AND 86% agree that more careful planning during set-up could have prevented operational issues


Summary 2

Summary (2)

  • Two-thirds would have liked more access to collaborative leadership resources in the early stages of their partnership(s)

    • Among the largest organisations the need is even more widespread

  • Getting ‘under the skin’ of the partner organisation – understanding their goals, culture and objectives – is the main advice to others considering collaborative partnerships

  • Partnerships are seen as ‘here to stay’ by 9 in 10 and are seen to be a key management tool for success by the same proportion

  • There is strong disagreement (90% disagree) that the benefits of partnership rarely outweigh the costs and should be avoided

  • Partnerships are also felt to offer a wider role for the future – in terms of global economic success and even for helping us to meet social goals


Presented by matthew chatterton david axford january 2007

Thank you.

Any questions?


  • Login