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Figurative Language. Poetry Fictional Stories. Simile. A comparison using like or as His feet were as big as boat s. Willow and Ginkgo Eve Merriam The willow is like an etching, Fine-lined against the sky. The ginkgo is like a crude sketch, Hardly worthy to be signed.

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Figurative language

Figurative Language

Poetry

Fictional Stories


Simile

Simile

A comparison using like or as

His feet were as big asboats.


Willow and Ginkgo

Eve Merriam

The willow is like an etching,

Fine-lined against the sky.

The ginkgo is like a crude sketch,

Hardly worthy to be signed.

The willow’s music is like a soprano,

Delicate and thin.

The ginkgo’s tune is like a chorus

With everyone joining in.

The willow is sleek as a velvet-nosed calf;

The ginkgo is leathery as an old bull.

The willow’s branches are like silken thread;

The ginkgo’s like stubby rough wool.


Metaphor

Metaphor

states that one thing is something else. It is a comparison, but it does NOT use like or as to make the comparison.

Her hair is silk.


Simile or metaphor

  • The baby was like an octopus, grabbing at all the cans on the grocery store shelves.

  • As the teacher entered the room she muttered under her breath, "This class is like a three-ring circus!“

  • The giant’s steps were thunder as he ran toward Jack.

  • The pillow was a cloud when I put my head upon it after a long day.

Simile or Metaphor?


Simile or metaphor1

  • I feel like a limp dishrag the grocery store shelves.

  • Those girls are like two peas in a pod.

  • The fluorescent light was the sun during our test.

  • No one invites Harold to parties because he’s a wet blanket.

  • The bar of soap was a slippery eel during the dog’s bath.

  • Ted was as nervous as a cat with a long tail in a room full of rocking chairs.

Simile or Metaphor?


Simile and metaphor game

  • Find a the grocery store shelvespartner

  • You have 15 minutes to come up with as many similes and metaphors for the word Mrs. Kimber gives you

  • You will get 1 point for each simile and 2 points for each metaphor

  • They must be written so that Ms. Kimber can read them

Simile and Metaphor Game


Water
Water the grocery store shelves

Make as many similes and metaphors as you can for this word.


Similes and Metaphors for Water the grocery store shelves

The water is like the sun shining brightly on a summer’s day.

The water drops are little dancers on the window sill.

Now you give me some…


Chocolate
Chocolate the grocery store shelves

Make as many similes and metaphors as you can for this word.


Hyperbole

Hyperbole the grocery store shelves

A hyperbole is a type of figurative language. It is often confused with a simile or a metaphor because it often compares two objects. The difference is a hyperbole is an exaggeration.


Hyperboles lyin larry by shell siverstein

Larry’s such a liar-- the grocery store shelvesHe tells outrageous lies.He says he’s ninety-nine years oldInstead of only five.He says he lives up on the moon.He says that he once flew.He says he’s really six feet fourInstead of three feet two.He says he had a billion dollars‘Stead of just a dime.

He says his mother is the moonWho taught him magic spells.He says his father is the windThat rings the morning bells.He says he can take stones and rocksAnd turn them into gold.He says he can take burnin’ fireAnd turn it freezin’ cold.He said he’d send me seven elevsTo help me with my chores.But Larry’s such a liar--He only sent me four.

Hyperboles“Lyin Larry” by Shell Siverstein


Hyperbole1

Hyperbole the grocery store shelves

Example: His feet were as big as a barge.

The hyperbole is comparing foot size to the size of a barge. Everyone knows that a barge is approximately 700 feet long. Imagine getting a pair of shoes that big!


Hyperbole2

  • I could sleep for a year. the grocery store shelves

  • This box weighs a ton.

  • I've told you a million times not to exaggerate.

  • Your mother is so small she does chin-ups on the curb

Hyperbole


Hyperbole3

  • Finish the following Hyperboles… the grocery store shelves

  • The class was so boring that…

  • The student was so smart that…

  • I was so thirsty that…

  • I was so tired that…

Hyperbole


Hyperboles lyin larry by shell siverstein1

Larry’s such a liar-- the grocery store shelvesHe tells outrageous lies.He says he’s ninety-nine years oldInstead of only five.He says he lives up on the moon.He says that he once flew.He says he’s really six feet fourInstead of three feet two.He says he had a billion dollars‘Stead of just a dime.

He says his mother is the moonWho taught him magic spells.He says his father is the windThat rings the morning bells.He says he can take stones and rocksAnd turn them into gold.He says he can take burnin’ fireAnd turn it freezin’ cold.He said he’d send me seven elevsTo help me with my chores.But Larry’s such a liar--He only sent me four.

Hyperboles“Lyin Larry” by Shell Siverstein


Hyperbole4

Hyperbole the grocery store shelves

Activity: I want you to pick one of the following hyperboles from “Lyin Larry” and draw a cartoon illustrating it.


Alliteration

Alliteration the grocery store shelves

The repetition of usually initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words or syllables


Alliteration1

Alliteration the grocery store shelves

“Garbage Soup Recipe” by Shell Silverstein

How do we make a garbage soup?A little glop, a little goop,A cup of slop, a quart of bunk,Then half a tablespoon of gunk,A pinch of grit, a dash of grime,A half a skuzz, a squeeze of slime.Aha — it shall be ready soon…Did you bring your bowl?Did you bring your spoon?


Alliteration2

Alliteration the grocery store shelves

Angela Abigail Applewhite ate anchovies and artichokes.

Bertha Bartholomew blew big, blue bubbles.

Clever Clifford Cutter clumisily closed the closet clasps.

Dwayne Dwiddle drew a drawing of dreaded Dracula.

Elmer Elwood eluded elven elderly elephants.

Floyd Flingle flipped flat flapjacks.

Greta Gruber grabbed a group of green grapes.

Hattie Henderson hated happy healthy hippos.


Alliteration3

Alliteration the grocery store shelves

Activity: Now we are going to work in pairs to replace words in the poem “Garbage Soup” to make it sound like a nice tasting meal.


Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeia the grocery store shelves

Naming a thing or an action by imitating the sound associated with it.


Onomatopoeia1

Onomatopoeia the grocery store shelves

“The Toy Eater” by Shell Silverstein

You don’t have to pick up your toys, okay?You can leave ‘em right there on the floor,So tonight when the Terrible Toy-Eatin’ TookleComes tiptoeing’ in through the crack in the door,He’ll crunch all your soldiers, he’ll munch on your trucks,He’ll chew your poor puppets to shreds,He’ll swallow your Big Wheel and slurp up your paintsAnd bite off your dear dollies’ heads.Then he’ll wipe off his lips with the sails of your ship,And making a bur pity noise,He’ll slither away-- but hey, that’s okay,You don’t have to pick up your toys.


Onomatopoeia2

Onomatopoeia the grocery store shelves

honk

buzz

splash


Onomatopoeia in Comics the grocery store shelves


Onomatopoeia in Comics the grocery store shelves


Onomatopoeia3

Onomatopoeia the grocery store shelves

Activity: Underline all of the words that have a sound associated with them.


Onomatopoeia4

Onomatopoeia the grocery store shelves

“The Toy Eater” by Shell Silverstein

You don’t have to pick up your toys, okay?You can leave ‘em right there on the floor,So tonight when the Terrible Toy-Eatin’ TookleComes tiptoeing’ in through the crack in the door,He’ll crunch all your soldiers, he’ll munch on your trucks,He’ll chew your poor puppets to shreds,He’ll swallow your Big Wheel and slurp up your paintsAnd bite off your dear dollies’ heads.Then he’ll wipe off his lips with the sails of your ship,And making a bur pity noise,He’ll slither away-- but hey, that’s okay,You don’t have to pick up your toys.


Personification

Personification the grocery store shelves

when a nonhuman thing is talked about as if it were human (a person)


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