Organizing government for an effective psd strategy a case of regulatory reform in korea
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Organizing Government for an Effective PSD Strategy - A Case of Regulatory Reform in Korea PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 69 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Organizing Government for an Effective PSD Strategy - A Case of Regulatory Reform in Korea. Presentation by Prof. Jong Seok Kim Professor of Economics, Hong Ik University & Member of Korean Regulatory Reform Committee 19 April 2005. Key Messages. Keys to effective PSD strategies:

Download Presentation

Organizing Government for an Effective PSD Strategy - A Case of Regulatory Reform in Korea

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Organizing government for an effective psd strategy a case of regulatory reform in korea

Organizing Government for an Effective PSD Strategy - A Case of Regulatory Reformin Korea

Presentation by

Prof. Jong Seok Kim

Professor of Economics, Hong Ik University &

Member of Korean Regulatory Reform Committee

19 April 2005


Key messages

Key Messages

  • Keys to effective PSD strategies:

    • Strong government leadership

    • Good coordination

    • Clear accountability

  • An effective institutional PSD mechanism should:

    • Coordinate strategies ACROSS ministries

    • Coordinate strategies between LEVELS of government

    • Provide continuity in the face of political change


The regulatory challenge in korea before 1997

The Regulatory Challenge in Korea - Before 1997

  • Korean economy had become heavily regulated during its rapid growth

  • Drive for reform out of popular demand from business since the early 1980s

  • Early attempts at reform were insufficient

  • 1997 financial crisis created new impetus


The challenge of leadership

The Challenge of Leadership

  • Establish clear rules and structure

    • The Basic Act on Administrative Regulation, 1997

  • Hold government accountable

    • Require regulatory impact analysis (RIA)

    • Register all existing regulations

  • Centralize coordination

    • Presidential Regulatory Reform Committee (RRC), formed in 1998


The presidential regulatory reform committee

The Presidential Regulatory Reform Committee

  • Reporting to the President

  • Co-chaired by the Prime Minister and a private

  • sector co-chair

  • Consists of 20 members

    • 7 cabinet ministers

    • 13 from the private sector, appointed on a 2-year term

  • Has a secretariat in the Prime Minister’s

  • office


Initial results

Initial Results

  • President ordered 50% of 11,125 existing regulations eliminated

  • Each ministry had to prove the need for its regulations before RRC during the process

  • Within 2 years: 43% of regulations eliminated and 22% revised

  • Virtually all areas of Korean economy and life were affected


Coordination across ministries

Coordination Across Ministries

  • Basic policy guidelines established across the government

    • Quality control and reform guidelines, e.g. RIA

  • Each ministry must propose new regulations and improvements through RRC

  • RRC pursues all ministries and agencies for compliance


Providing continuity

Providing Continuity

  • RRC functions became a normal part of government

  • Integrated into all government institutions through administrative processes

  • Combination of stakeholder and cabinet appointees, on separate term cycles

  • Independent and publicly accountable


Results after six years

Results - After Six Years

  • Permanent system for regulatory reform firmly installed

  • Regulatory design not an exclusive function of regulating ministries any longer

  • Initial reform drive lost momentum as political support waned

  • Coordination between RRC and the provincial governments was insufficient

  • Quality of RIA is still low


Lessons learned

Lessons Learned

  • Independence and political support essential to credible role of coordinating the reform

  • Accountability links to ministries and local government needed to enforce change

  • Implementation requires plenty of expert support, at several levels of government

  • Make changes visible at local government level to keep up momentum


Conclusion

Conclusion

  • Keep political leadership visible and strong

  • Make the policy and its coordinating agency a permanent part of government

  • Maintain consistent reform principles across the government

  • Build coalition for the reform within society


For more information

For More Information

Prof. Jong Seok Kim

Email: [email protected]

RETA website:

http://www.adb.org/Projects/Supporting-PSD-Strategies


  • Login