Mongol eurasia and its aftermath 1200 1500 chapter 12
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 35

Mongol Eurasia and its Aftermath, 1200-1500 Chapter 12 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 165 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Mongol Eurasia and its Aftermath, 1200-1500 Chapter 12. The Rise of the Mongols, 1200-1260. Nomadism in Central and Inner Asia. Nomads depended on: Resulting in: Hierarchy system headed by a.. Tribute Marriage Religion Religious pluralism Economy Strive for self sufficiency but.

Download Presentation

Mongol Eurasia and its Aftermath, 1200-1500 Chapter 12

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Mongol Eurasia and its Aftermath, 1200-1500Chapter 12


The Rise of the Mongols, 1200-1260


Nomadism in Central and Inner Asia

  • Nomads depended on:

    • Resulting in:

  • Hierarchy system headed by a..

  • Tribute

  • Marriage

  • Religion

    • Religious pluralism

  • Economy

    • Strive for self sufficiency but..


The Mongol Conquests, 1215-1283

  • Genghis Khan 1206-1234, and successors conquered all of ___ and were threatening the Song.

  • Unification (Great Khan in Mongolia)

    • Golden Horde

    • Jagadai, Central Asia

    • Il-Khans


  • 1265 Khubilai declared himself Great Khan.

    • Yuan Empire

      • Southern Song

      • Annam

      • Champa


  • Ability to conquer

    • Horsemanship

    • Weapons

    • Technique

    • Adaptation

    • Recruit

    • Reputation/intimidation

    • opportunists


Overland Trade and the Plague

  • Eurasia

    • What type of knowledge was exchanged between: Europe, Middle East, China, Iran, and Japan?

  • Diseases

    • Spread via trade routes from Southwest China to the ______.


Mongols and Islam 1260-1500


Mongol Rivalry

  • 1260s rivalry between the Il-Khan Mongol Empire and their Muslim subjects were tense.

    • Why?

  • At the same time Russia was under the Golden Horde, led by Batu who converted to Islam. What were his intentions?


Il-KhanGolden Horde


  • What role did Europe play in this conflict?

    • A failed alliance

      Islam and the State

  • Il-Khan State used the tax farming system.

    • Worked at first; However:

    • What attempts were made to fix this?

      • 1295-1349 depression

    • Noble Mongols fought each other for left over revenues

    • Golden Horde invaded

    • Timurids emerged in the Middle East


Culture and Science in Islamic Eurasia

  • Juvaini

  • Rashid al-Din, Jew who converted to Islam and advisor to Il-Khans, wrote…

    • What does this tell us about the Mongol world?


  • Astronomy

    • calendars, epicycles, prediction of eclipses

  • Mathematics

    • Adapted Indian numerical system

    • More accurate calculation of pi

    • Passed on to _______.


Regional Responses in Western Eurasia


Russia and Rule from Afar

  • Golden Horde made their capital at the mouth of Volga, ruling Russia from afar

    • Goal:

  • The Mongols favored Novgorod and Moscow. Why?

    • These cities emerged as center of Russian civilization.


  • Historic controversy

    • Some historians believe in the “Mongol yoke”

    • Some believe that Kievan state was already declining before Mongol rule due to:

  • Ivan III, the prince of Moscow, ended Mongol rule in 1480 and adopted the title of “ “.


New States in Eastern Europe and Anatolia

  • How did the forces of the Mongols take over Eastern Europe?

    • International force

    • Vienna

    • Withdrew

  • Diplomatic trade

  • “I’m losing my religion”


  • Rise of Lithuania (and Balkan kingdoms)

    • Due to

  • Antolia to Constantinople

    • Islamic culture

  • Ottomans, in eastern Anatolia in the 1300s were kept in check by the Timurids, expanded eastward in the 1400s and conquered Constantinople in 1453.


Mongol Domination in China1271-1368


The Yuan Empire, 1279-1368

  • Khubilia Khan practiced Chinese tradition and government.

    • Fragmented: Song, Tanggut, and Jin were unified.

  • Beijing

  • Lamas

  • Government innovations

    • Tax farming

    • W. Asian officials

    • Hierarchy

    • Decline in Confucianism

    • Merchants and doctors elevated


  • Urban prosperity

    • Trade and merchants flourished

    • Corporations

    • Literature

    • Gentry

    • Mandarin dialect developed

  • Rural decline. Why?

  • Population decline. Why?


Cultural and Scientific Exchange

  • Exchange of technological, and mathematical knowledge was common between Iran (______) and China (_____). They both enjoyed good relations and had similar policies and sponsored intellectual pursuits.

    • Yuan imported:

    • Il-khans imported:


The Fall of the Yuan Empire

  • Problems:

  • Zhu Yuanzhang (Chinese) brought an end to years of chaos and rebellions.

    • Ming dynasty

      • Rivals: Mongols, Jurchens (Jins),


The Early Ming Empire1368-1500


Ming China on a Mongol Foundation

  • Goals of Zhu Yuanzhang/Hongwu:

    • close trade with C. Asia and Middle East

    • Reassert _______

    • Nanjing

  • Continuation of (Yuan):

    • Provincial

    • Hereditary professional categories

    • Mongol calendar


  • 1405-1433 the Ming dispatched a series of expeditions to:

    • Zheng He

      • Added some luxury goods and 50 tribute countries.

      • Why did voyages end?


Technology and Population

  • Slowdown in technological innovation.

    • Why?

    • _____ and _____ moved ahead of China in technological innovation.

      • Korea- firearms, shipping, meteorology, calendars

      • Japan- mining, metallurgy, and household goods


The Ming Achievement

  • The Ming was a period of great wealth, consumerism, cultural brilliance, literature, and luxury goods.


Centralization and Militarism in East Asia, 1200-1500


Korea from the Mongols to the Yi, 1231-1500

  • Korea concedes in 1258

    • King of Koryo merges family

    • Profited from technology (Yuan)

  • Collapsed after the Yuan fell, replaced by Yi dynasty (after Ming).

    • Continuation of Ming


  • Technology

    • Moveable type, meteorological science, calendar, fertilizer reservoirs, cotton

    • Military

      • Patrol ships, cannons, arrow launchers, armored ships


Political Transformation in Japan 1274-1500

  • First invasion 1272 against the decentralized Kamakura

    • Result:

  • Second invasion 1281..

    • Result:


  • Kamakura shogunate destroyed by..

  • Ashikaga period 1338

    • Relatively weak, schools, increased agriculture, and artistic creativity

  • Onin war 1477

    • Local rivalry

    • More decentralized


The Emergence of Vietnam, 1200-1500

  • Divided

    • Chinese-influenced Annam in the north

    • Indian-influenced Champa in the south

    • (tribute from both)

    • After fall of Yuan, the two Vietnams resumed war with each other

  • Ming rule

    • Ruled Annam early 15th until 1428.

    • By 1500, Annam completely defeated Champa and established a _________ style government over all of Vietnam.


Conclusion

  • In every case, the threat or reality of Mongol invasion led to:

  • How did they deal with cultural, ethnic diversity?

  • How was trade effected?


  • Login