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The operand recognition paradigm as a method to investigate individuals’ arithmetic strategies. Catherine THEVENOT. Department of Psychology UNIVERSITY OF GENEVA. San S ebastian, Saturday 1 st October 2011. How do you solve 7 + 8 ?. You know that 7 + 8 = 15

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The operand recognition paradigm as a method to investigate individuals arithmetic strategies

The operand recognition paradigm as a method to investigate individuals’ arithmetic strategies

Catherine

THEVENOT

Department of Psychology

UNIVERSITY OF GENEVA

San Sebastian, Saturday 1st October 2011


How do individuals’ arithmetic strategiesyousolve

7 + 8 ?

You know that 7 + 8 = 15

- Direct retrieval of the resultfrom long-termmemory

You know that 7 + 7 = 14, then 7 + 7 + 1 = 15

- Use of derivedfacts

- Operanddecomposition


How do individuals’ arithmetic strategieswe know how yousolve

7 + 8 ?

Solution times (Groen & Parkman, 1972)

Reconstructive strategies are inferredfrom long solution times = Typical in children

Retrievalisinferredwhen solution times are shorter = Typical in adults


How do individuals’ arithmetic strategieswe know how yousolve

7 + 8 ?

Solution times

LeFevre et al., 1996

Siegler, 1989

Solution times are averagedacrossdifferent trials .

BUT, because of the variability in the proceduresused, mean solution times cannotreflect a reality.


How do individuals’ arithmetic strategieswe know how yousolve

7 + 8 ?

Verbal reports (LeFevre et al., 1996)

A large variety of strategies are used by adults and children

Adults report more retrievalstrategythanwhatissuggested by solution times.


How do individuals’ arithmetic strategieswe know how yousolve

7 + 8 ?

Verbal reports (Kirk & Ashcraft, 2001)

Introspection is NOT bias-free

Fast processes cannot reach consciousness : Retrieval !


A individuals’ arithmetic strategiesparadigmthatdoes not rely on solution times

or on verbal reports

thatdoes not draw the attention of participants

on the goal of the study

The operand-recognition

paradigm


The individuals’ arithmetic strategiesoperand Recognition paradigm

Participants have to solveproblems :

- Numbers are presented one by one

- Participants are informed about the task to bedonebefore the first numberappears on screen

- An operand recognition taskisproposedafter the problem has been solved


The individuals’ arithmetic strategiesoperand Recognition paradigm

18

18

23

A

41


The individuals’ arithmetic strategiesoperand Recognition paradigm

A 23 18 41 18

Verificationtask

Recognition task

A calculationproceduredegrades the memory traces

of the operandsinvolved in the problem.

Thevenot, Castel, Fanget, & Fayol (2010), JEP: LMC

Thevenot, Barrouillet & Fayol (2001), QJEP-A


The individuals’ arithmetic strategiesoperand Recognition paradigm

A 23 18 41 18

Verificationtask

Recognition task

C 23 18 21 18

Comparisontask

Recognition task

Thevenot, Barrouillet, & Fayol (2001), QJEP-A


The individuals’ arithmetic strategiesoperand Recognition paradigm

A 23 18 41 18

C 23 18 21 18

If recognition times are longer in A than in C

a procedure have been used

If recognition times are the same in A and in C

the answer has been retrieved

Thevenot, Barrouillet, & Fayol (2001), QJEP-A


Exp individuals’ arithmetic strategies.1: ADDITION IN ADULTS as a function of theirarithmeticskills

Large = Two-digit numbers (e.g., 23 + 18)

Small = One-digit numbers with a sum up to 10 (e.g., 3 + 5)

Medium = One-digit numbers with a sum greater than 10 (e.g., 9 + 7)

Thevenot, Fanget, & Fayol (2007), Memory & Cognition


EXP. 2 : individuals’ arithmetic strategiesSUBTRACTION IN ADULTS as a function of theirarithmeticskills

Large = 41 – 23

Small = 8 – 3

Medium = 16 - 9

Thevenot, Castel, Fanget, & Fayol (2010), JEP: LMC


EXP.2 : individuals’ arithmetic strategiesSUBTRACTION IN ADULTS as a function of theirarithmeticskills

Thevenot, Castel, Fanget, & Fayol (2010), JEP: LMC


CONCLUSIONS individuals’ arithmetic strategies

The operand-recognition paradigm is a good tool in order to determine the strategies used by individuals to solve arithmetic problems

It is more informative than verbal reports


BUT individuals’ arithmetic strategies

An alternative interpretation of our results in terms of switch-cost

A 23 18 41 18

C 23 18 21 18

SWITCH

Metcalfe & Campbell, 2010 : Psy. Research

Metcalfe & Campbell, 2011 : JEP - LMC


BUT individuals’ arithmetic strategies

It is more demanding to switch from a difficult to an easy task than the other way round (Arbuthnott, 2008)

>

A 23 18 41 18

C 23 18 21 18

SWITCH

Metcalfe & Campbell, 2010 : Psy. Research

Metcalfe & Campbell, 2011 : JEP - LMC


THEN individuals’ arithmetic strategies

Higher recognition times after addition than comparison reflect higher switch cost rather than different strategies

>

A 23 18 41 18

C 23 18 21 18

SWITCH

Metcalfe & Campbell, 2010 : Psy. Research

Metcalfe & Campbell, 2011 : JEP - LMC


HOWEVER individuals’ arithmetic strategies

A 23 18 41 18

C 23 18 21 18

The switch-cost to the recognition task is in fact higher after a comparison than after an addition

SWITCH

Longer recognition task after addition cannot only reflect

differential switch-cost


CONCLUSIONS individuals’ arithmetic strategies

The operand-recognition paradigm is a good tool

in order to investigate individuals’ arithmetic strategies

Adults with low and higher arithmetic skills

differ in the way they solve simple problems

This is not revealed by verbal reports

Differential switch-costs depending on the task cannot explain the entirety of our results


THANK YOU FOR YOUR individuals’ arithmetic strategies

ATTENTION


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