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Draft Revised National Curriculum Statement. Address to Parliamentary Portfolio Committee, 18 September 2001. OUTLINE & PURPOSE. C2005 AND NATIONAL CURRICULUM STATEMENT BRIEF PROCESS CONTENT WHAT’S NEW? MAIN THEMES IMPLEMENTATION WAY FORWARD. C2005 REVIEW HIGHLIGHTS.

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Draft Revised National Curriculum Statement

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Draft Revised National Curriculum Statement

Address to Parliamentary Portfolio Committee,

18 September 2001


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OUTLINE & PURPOSE

  • C2005 AND NATIONAL CURRICULUM STATEMENT

  • BRIEF

  • PROCESS

  • CONTENT

  • WHAT’S NEW?

  • MAIN THEMES

  • IMPLEMENTATION

  • WAY FORWARD


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C2005 REVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

  • Too many design features and not enough specification by grade

  • Complex terminology complicating translation into classroom

  • Curriculum overload ito learning areas and design

  • Rushed implementation


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TERMS OF REFERENCE

CEM: JUNE 2001

  • National Curriculum Statement

  • Plan for implementation

  • Special attention to history and environmental education


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TERMS OF REFERENCE

CABINET : JULY 2001

  • ‘The development of a National Curriculum Statement, which must deal in clear and simple language with what the curriculum requirements are at various levels and phases, must begin immediately...


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TERMS OF REFERENCE

CABINET (CONTINUED)

  • Such a statement must also address the concerns around curriculum overload and must give a clear description of the kind of learner - in terms of knowledge, skills, values and attitudes - that is expected at the end of the GET band.’


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BRIEF

  • National Curriculum Statement in clear and simple language with a sense of kind of learner to be created

  • History and environmental education

  • Overload

  • Plan for its implementation


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MANDATE: PROCESS

  • Planning, operationalisation and establishment of structures: Sept 2000 - Jan 2001

  • Curriculum development, field testing and redrafting: Feb - May 2001

  • Editing and fine-tuning: June/July 2001


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MANDATE: CONTENT

1.DRAFT REVISED NATIONAL CURRICULUM STATEMENT:

  • One Overview

  • Eight Learning Area Statements: Maths, Languages, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Arts and Culture, Economic and Management Sciences, Technology, Life Orientation

  • Qualification Framework


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MANDATE: CONTENT

2. KIND OF LEARNER ENVISAGED

  • Constitution the foundation

  • Curriculum to create a citizen for a democratic South Africa

  • The envisaged learner will be able to communicate and work effectively, solve problems, organise and manage activities, work with information, in teams, use science and technology, and be curious, critical, adaptable, multi-skilled, accountable, and socially aware.


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MANDATE: CONTENT

3. HISTORY AND

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

  • Two separate curricula

  • History focuses on developing a historical consciousness

  • Environmental education cross-curricular


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MANDATE: CONTENT

4. REDUCTION OF OVERLOAD

  • Reducing complexity of curriculum

  • Time allocation

  • Learning Programme guidelines

  • Implementation framework

  • Proposals are all in the Overview


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TIME ALLOCATION

FOUNDATION PHASE

  • Literacy: 40%

  • Numeracy:35%

  • Life Skills:25%


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TIME ALLOCATION

INTERMEDIATE PHASE

Languages:30%

Mathematics:18%

Nat Sciences and

Technology:20%

Social Sciences:14%

Arts and Culture:8%

Life Skills, Economy

and Society::10%


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TIME ALLOCATION

SENIOR PHASE

  • Languages25%

  • Mathematics18%

  • Natural Sciences13%

  • Social Sciences12%

  • Arts and Culture8%

  • Life Orientation8%

  • EMS8%

  • Technology8%


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WHAT’S NEW?

  • National priorities infused into curriculum

  • Clear and accessible curriculum: fewer design features (2/3 not 7/8)

  • High knowledge/high skills curriculum: clear, achievable standards


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WHAT’S NEW?

  • Balanced curriculum: conceptual progression built in across grades and integration of knowledge, skills and values within and across learning areas

  • Curriculum and assessment aligned

  • Qualifications Framework: whole qualification for schools (Grades R-9) linked to curriculum design and content.


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MAIN THEMES: Synergy with Values Manifesto

  • Social justice, equity, development

  • National identity

  • Gender and anti-racism

  • Multilingualism

  • Reading, writing and thinking

  • Mathematics and Sciences

  • Indigenous knowledge and culture


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MAIN THEMES: Values Manifesto Synergy

  • Environment

  • History and historical consciousness

  • Religion and not Religious Education

  • Sport and nation-building

  • HIV/Aids and Sexual Responsibility

  • Safety in schools and society


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DESIGN OF LEARNING AREA STATEMENT

  • Introduction to National Curriculum Statement

  • Learning Outcomes & Assessment Standards by phase and grade

  • Assessment guidelines

  • Sample Progression Schedules (recording learner performance)


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IMPLEMENTATION

  • Framework included in Overview

  • Implementation in 2004/5/6/7

  • 2002/3:Pilot; LSMs & Prof Development

  • 2001:Public comment,revision, finalisation; LP guidelines


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IMPLEMENTATION

  • 2004:Foundation Phase (Grade R-3)

  • 2005:Intermediate Phase (Gr 4-6)

  • 2006:Senior Phase (Grade 7)

  • 2007:Senior Phase (Grade 8)

  • 2008:Senior Phase (Grade 9) &

    GETC for Schools


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LEARNING SUPPORT MATERIALS

  • Policy to be developed in:

  • Approved national structure for a Quality Assurance list

  • Budgeting and effective delivery systems

  • Price banding to ensure cost control and more adequate budgeting forecasts

  • Ways to assess use of existing C2005 materials


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TEACHER ORIENTATION

  • Distinction between orientation, development and education

  • Short and long-term strategies

  • National teacher development strategy: conference in October

  • Short-term: Cadre of trainers


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TEACHER ORIENTATION

  • Short and long-term:

    • A review of use of 80 hours

    • Involvement of higher education institutions, teacher unions and NGOs

    • Training of teachers, principals and district personnel

    • Professional development with new foci


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INTERIM IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES

  • Current C2005 continues until new is introduced

  • Curriculum 2005 training effectively finished by 2002

  • Grade 6 may be looked at

  • HEDCOM substructure to examine trajectories of implementation more closely and devise specific plans


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WHAT DOES NCS TRY TO DO?

  • Encourage creativity of teachers while providing clear principles and guidelines for teachers working in difficult conditions

  • Address country’s priorities clearly and simply

  • Make good use of OBE


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WHAT DOES NCS TRY TO DO?

  • Make learners aware of the uniqueness of being South African and African, but in the context of being citizens of communities and citizens of the world – we are specific while being universal


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WAY FORWARD

  • PUBLIC CONSULTATION

  • PUBLIC COMMENT TO 12 OCT AND REVISION BY END YEAR

  • ADVOCACY

  • LEARNING PROGRAMME GUIDELINES

  • DETAILED IMPLEMENTATION PLAN


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Personal

Communicative

Educational

Aesthetic

Cultural

Political

Critical

Languages

“Languages are central to our lives. We communicate and understand our world through language. It constructs identity and knowledge.”

Languages serve a variety of purposes:


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“In a multilingual country like South Africa it is important that learners reach high levels of proficiency in at least two languages, and that they are able to communicate in other languages”

“The Languages Learning Area Statement covers all 11 official languages as home languages, first and second additional languages”


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Languages Learning Outcomes

  • Listening – to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically.

  • Speaking – to communicate confidently and effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.

  • Reading and Viewing – to read and view for information and enjoyment, and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

  • Writing – to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.

  • Thinking and Reasoning - to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.

  • Language and Grammar – to use sounds, vocabulary and grammar of the additional language.


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Mathematics

“While sound mathematical development remains paramount, …access to mathematics is a basic human right in itself… (it is) … neither culture nor value free. Mathematics…builds awareness of human rights, social, economic and environmental issues… (and is) … relevant to learners’ realities”


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Math concepts and skills will enable learners to:

  • Be mathematically literate.

  • Use mathematical tools to expose inequities and assess environmental problems and risks in society.

  • Develop critical and insightful reasoning and interpretive skills.

  • Use mathematical notation and language.

  • Apply Mathematics in a variety of contexts.

  • Transfer mathematical knowledge and skills between learning areas.

  • Display mental, algorithmic and technological confidence and accuracy in working with number, data, space and shape, patterns and relationships, and problems.


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Mathematics Learning Outcomes

  • Numbers, operations and relationships

    The learner is able to recognise, describe and represent numbers and their relationships; and counts, estimates, calculates and checks with competence and confidence in solving problems.

  • Patterns, functions and algebra

    The learner is able to recognise, describe and represent patterns and relationships, and solves problems using algebraic language and skills.

  • Space and Shape

    The learner is able to describe and represent characteristics and relationships between 2-D shapes and 3-D objects in a variety of orientations and positions.

  • Measurement

    The learner is able to use appropriate measuring units, instruments and formulae in a variety of contexts.

  • Data handling

    The learner is able to collect, summarise, display and critically analyse data to draw conclusions and make predictions, and to interpret and determine chance variation.


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Natural Sciences

“What is today known as science has its roots in Greek, Arabic, Chinese and African cultures. It has been shaped by the search to understand the natural world through observation and testing, and has evolved to become part of the cultural heritage of all nations”.


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Natural Sciences Learning Outcomes

  • The learner is able to develop and use science process skills in a variety of contexts.

  • The learner is able to develop and apply scientific knowledge and understanding.

  • The learner is able to gain an appreciation of the relationship and responsibilities between science and society.

Natural Sciences Strands:

  • Life and Living

  • The Earth and Beyond

  • Matter and Materials

  • Energy and Change


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Social Sciences

“Social Sciences…involves the study of relationships between people, and between people and the environment at various times and in various places… In social, political, economic and environmental dimensions…values, attitudes and beliefs are shaped by these relationships”.


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“In accordance with the national call for greater emphasis on history and environmental education, the Learning Area Statement provides distinct outcomes for History and Geography…though there are clear and specified points for integration such as the promotion of social justice and human rights…land use…migration and settlement…apartheid…”

“In both History and Geography issues should include…prejudice, persecution, oppression, exploitation, sexism and racism, xenophobia, genocide and other forms of discrimination…”


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History Learning Outcomes

“History will develop… historical consciousness…a sense of identity and common memory… civic responsibility… conceptual tools to analyse and interpret… an appreciation of oral tradition and archaeology… awareness of how we can influence our future to build a non-racial, democratic future”.

  • The learner is able to demonstrate historical knowledge and understanding.

  • The learner is able to use enquiry skills to investigate the past and present.

  • The learner is able to demonstrate an understanding of historical interpretation.

In addition to the Learning Outcomes, the curriculum for both History and Geography provides specific knowledge focus areas for teachers and learners.


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Geography Learning Outcomes

“Geography will develop… skills and values… human interaction with physical, natural, economic, social and political environments… critical awareness of issues such as gender, power and poverty in national, regional and global context… skills such as analysis, interpretation of maps, pictures, charts and tables, graphs… fieldwork and research, presenting, … information and testing hypotheses…”


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GEOGRAPHY

  • The learner is able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the interrelationships between people, resources and the environment..

  • The learner is able to use enquiry skills to investigate key concepts and processes used in Geography.

  • The learner is able to make critical and informed choices, and takes actions to deal with social and environmental issues.


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Arts and Culture

“Arts and Culture… embraces the spiritual, material, intellectual and emotional aspects of … South African indigenous arts and culture practices… and introduces learners to other arts and culture in Africa and beyond…”


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“… the purpose of arts and culture… (is) … to develop creative individuals … responsible citizens … in life with the constitution of South Africa…”

“Learners have opportunities to develop … usable skills, knowledge, values and attitudes in arts and culture … to build … a shared national heritage and identity … for life, living and life-long-learning…”

“Learners participate in a wide range of … activities … Drama, Dance, Music, Visual Arts and Design, Media and Communication, Arts Management, Arts Technology, Literature and Heritage …”


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Arts and Culture Learning Outcomes

  • The Learner is able to create and present works of art in each of the art forms.

  • The learner is able to reflect critically on artistic and cultural processes and products in past and present contexts.

  • The learner is able to demonstrate personal and interpersonal skills through individual and group participation in arts and culture activities.

  • The learner is able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in arts and culture.


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Each of the outcomes covers:

  • Drama

  • Dance

  • Music

  • Visual Arts

And the Grade 8 and 9 assessment standards make provision for some specialization.


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Life Orientation

“It is concerned with … all-round development of learners … with their personal, intellectual, emotional, spiritual and physical growth, the development of the self-in-society … within the quest for a democratic society, a productive economy…”


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“(Learners) … will learn to make informed decisions, form positive social relationships, exercise their constitutional rights and responsibilities, … respond to the challenges in their worlds … contribute to society, … promote sport and physical development … and develop a positive orientation to study and work…”


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Life Orientation Learning Outcomes

  • The learner is able to make informed decisions about personal, community and environmental health.

  • The learner is able to demonstrate active commitment to constitutional rights and social responsibilities and show sensitivity to diverse cultures and belief systems.

  • The learner is able to use acquired life skills to achieve and extend personal potential to respond effectively to challenges in his/her world.

  • The learner is able to demonstrate an understanding of and participate in activities that promote movement and physical development.

  • The learner is able to make informed choices and decisions about further study and career choices.


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Economic and Management Sciences

“Economic and Management Sciences … is concerned with … basic skills and knowledge required to manage our lives … and environments effectively … to understand the basics of an economy …”


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“(It) encompasses the study of the use of resources effectively and equitably to satisfy people’s needs and wants … while reflecting critically on the impact of resource exploitation … on people and the environment …”

“… develop in learners the skills to operate effectively in terms of basic entrepreneurship, financial management and planning…”


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Economic and Management Sciences Learning Outcomes

  • The learner is able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the flow of money in solving the economic problem.

  • The learner is able to demonstrate an understanding of reconstruction, growth and development and reflect critically on its related processes.

  • The learner is able to demonstrate knowledge and the ability to apply a range of managerial, consumer and financial skills.

  • The learner is able to develop entrepreneurial attitudes knowledge and skills.


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Technology

“Technology is a human activity … involves developing solutions to people’s needs … by combining skills, values, knowledge and resources with sensitivity … for social and environmental factors”.


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“…will contribute to learners’ technological literacy by … (ensuring that they) … learn to appreciate the interaction between technology, society and the environment … solve technological problems … understand the technological concepts and use them … responsibility to solve technological problems …”

“Technological skills to be developed … include … investigating, designing, making, evaluating and communicating solutions …”

“Information and communication technology will include skills from word processing, to accessing, processing and using information from a variety of technologies…”


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Technology Learning Outcomes

  • The learner is able to demonstrate an understanding of the inter-relationships between technology, society and the environment.

  • The learner is able to apply technological processes and skills ethically and responsibly, using relevant knowledge concepts.

  • The learner is able to access, process and use information in a variety of contexts.


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THANK YOU


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THANK YOU


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