Philadelphia-Camden Cultural Participation Benchmarking Project
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Philadelphia-Camden Cultural Participation Benchmarking Project Presentation of Neighborhood Survey Results June 14, 2005 Alan Brown PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Philadelphia-Camden Cultural Participation Benchmarking Project Presentation of Neighborhood Survey Results June 14, 2005 Alan Brown. Methodology. Door-to-door intercept methodology (orally administered interviews) Random sample of addresses in each of the five neighborhoods

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Philadelphia-Camden Cultural Participation Benchmarking Project Presentation of Neighborhood Survey Results June 14, 2005 Alan Brown

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Available in powerpoint

Philadelphia-Camden Cultural Participation Benchmarking Project

Presentation of Neighborhood Survey Results

June 14, 2005

Alan Brown

1


Methodology

Methodology

  • Door-to-door intercept methodology (orally administered interviews)

  • Random sample of addresses in each of the five neighborhoods

  • Approximately 75% of all interviews were completed at listed addresses.

  • Culturally-appropriate approach to data collection

    • Point Breeze Performing Arts Center students, alumni and staff

  • A total of 602 interviews were completed between June and October 2004 – about 120 in each neighborhood.

    • 78 interviews (13%) were conducted in Spanish

2


Neighborhood map

Neighborhood Map

3


Who did we talk to

Who did we talk to?

  • Mostly females (between 65% and 70%)

  • Mostly younger adults (25 – 44)

  • High School education

  • Predominantly African Americans and Hispanics

    African-Hispanic or

    AmericanMixed Race/Other

    North Phil. – West80%9%

    North Phil. – Central71%15%

    North Phil. – East34%53%

    North Camden26%52%

    South Camden39%32%

4


What did we ask them

What did we ask them?

  • Questions about community engagement

  • Questions about participation in:

    • music, dance, theatre, visual arts, literature and spoken word, media arts, other creative outlets

  • Awareness of specific arts programs

  • Connection to an artist/cultural leader

  • Desire to do more arts activities

  • Use of the Internet

  • Demographics

5


A framework for thinking about participation

A framework for thinking about participation

6


Available in powerpoint

Five Modes of Arts Participation,

Based on Level of

Creative Control

NONE

  • Inventive Arts Participationengages the mind, body and spirit in an act of artistic creation that is unique and idiosyncratic, regardless of skill level.

NONE

NONE

NONE

AMOUNT OF CREATIVE CONTROL

TOTAL

AMOUNT OF CREATIVE CONTROL

  • Interpretive Arts Participationis a creative act of self-expression that brings alive and adds value to pre-existing works of art, either individually or collaboratively.

  • Curatorial Arts Participationis the creative act of purposefully selecting, organizing and collecting art to the satisfaction of one’s own artistic sensibility.

  • Observational Arts Participationencompasses arts experiences that you select or consent to, motivated by some expectation of value.

  • Ambient Arts Participationinvolves experiencing art, consciously or unconsciously, that you did not select.

NONE

7


Participation findings music

Participation Findings: Music

8


Curatorial is the dominant mode of music participation

Curatorial is the Dominant Mode of Music Participation

9


What do you sing r b gospel latin hip hop

What do you sing? R&B, Gospel, Latin, Hip Hop

10


Singing is both a social and solitary activity

Singing is both a social and solitary activity

11


Keyboard drums and guitar are the most commonly played instruments

Keyboard, drums and guitar are the most commonly played instruments

12


Community venues play a key role in the delivery system

Community venues play a key role in the delivery system

13


Participation findings dance and theatre

Participation Findings: Dance and Theatre

14


Social dancing film dominate dance theatre participation

Social dancing, film dominate dance/theatre participation

15


The home and nightclubs are venues for social dancing

The home and nightclubs are venues for social dancing

16


Hip hop ballet ethnic and praise dance are the types of dance performances mentioned most often

Hip Hop, Ballet, Ethnic and Praise Dance are the types of dance performances mentioned most often

17


Community facilities also play a key role in dance and theatre participation

Community facilities also play a key role in dance and theatre participation

18


Participation findings visual arts crafts

Participation Findings: Visual Arts & Crafts

19


Most respondents are involved at some level with visual arts

Most respondents are involved at some level with visual arts

20


Observe the differences in art making activities by gender

Observe the differences in art-making activities by gender…

21


And by ethnicity

… and by ethnicity

22


The context for doing art craft making activities is typically by yourself

The context for doing art/craft-making activities is typically “by yourself…”

23


And at home

…and “at home”

24


What s hanging on the walls in your home

What’s hanging on the walls in your home?

  • Four in ten respondents said they “display paintings, posters, photographs, or other art in your house.”

  • Among those who do, the most meaningful pieces of art in their home are:

    • Paintings, unspecified

    • Religious art (paintings, drawings, statues)

    • Family photos

    • Posters and photos of athletes and performers

    • Artwork by children

25


Home display of art is related to personal participation

Home display of art is related to personal participation

26


Participation findings other activities

Participation Findings: Other Activities

27


A third of respondents say they do creative writing and almost all say they read for fun

A third of respondents say they do creative writing, and almost all say they “read for fun”

28


What do you write

What do you write?

29


Overall levels of lifetime involvement in arts education activities are low

Overall, levels of lifetime involvement in arts education activities are low

30


Significant other outlets for creative expression include the living arts

Significant other outlets for creative expression include the “living arts”

31


Other key findings

Other Key Findings

32


Community based arts groups have a substantial footprint in the three n philadelphia neighborhoods

Community-based arts groups have a substantial footprint in the three N. Philadelphia neighborhoods

33


Only about one in ten respondents know an artist or cultural leader

Only about one in ten respondents “know an artist or cultural leader”

34


Knowing an artist or cultural leader is a strong indicator of participation

Knowing an artist or cultural leader is a strong indicator of participation

35


Summary of ideas

Summary of Ideas

36


Available in powerpoint

“Five Modes” Participation Profile,

Five Neighborhoods

NONE

  • Inventive – Key forms of inventive participation include making art and crafts, writing original poetry/rap, letters and diaries, and also gardening, cooking

NONE

NONE

NONE

AMOUNT OF CREATIVE CONTROL

TOTAL

AMOUNT OF CREATIVE CONTROL

  • Interpretive – Interpretive activities include social dancing, singing and rapping to music on the radio, but not much instrument playing

  • Curatorial participation is strong – collecting music, listening to radio, displaying art in the home, dressing creatively

  • Observational – some music, theatre attendance, also zoo/aquarium; much occurs in community venues, esp. free events

  • Ambient Arts Participation– not much data here, except for the ambient art that people create for themselves at home

NONE

37


Summary of participation findings

Summary of Participation Findings

  • One sees a clear emphasis on at-home cultural participation, both social and solitary

    • New emphasis on curatorial participation

  • Churches, community centers and outdoor venues are key parts of the delivery system

  • Significant differences in participation patterns across racial/ethnic groups

  • Radio is the dominant mode of music consumption

  • Many are active participants in the “living arts”

  • Few personally know artists or cultural leaders

38


Implications for increasing cultural participation

Implications for Increasing Cultural Participation

  • Increase access to artists and cultural leaders at the neighborhood level

  • Invest in community-based arts programs and venues, including church arts programs

  • Home-based, self-directed arts activities

  • Access to musical instruments

  • Radio as a distribution channel

  • Different interventions for different racial/ethnic groups

  • The “living arts” are an opening

  • Participatory community cultural projects involving children

39


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