Trends obstacles and opportunities affecting instream flow issues
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 44

Trends, Obstacles, and Opportunities Affecting Instream Flow Issues PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 86 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Trends, Obstacles, and Opportunities Affecting Instream Flow Issues. by Tom Annear, Wyoming Game & Fish Department Nina Burkardt, U. S. Geological Survey. Easy. What is success?. Failure ?. Success?. Success as a level of flow protection. Full ecosystem protection

Download Presentation

Trends, Obstacles, and Opportunities Affecting Instream Flow Issues

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Trends, Obstacles, and OpportunitiesAffecting Instream Flow Issues

by

Tom Annear, Wyoming Game & Fish Department

Nina Burkardt, U. S. Geological Survey


Easy


What is success?


Failure ?

Success?


Success as a level of flow protection

  • Full ecosystem protection

  • Comprehensive ecologically based management

  • Partial ecologically based management

  • Threshold level protection

  • No formal flow protection


Full Ecosystem Protection

Comprehensive Protection

Partial Protection

Threshold Protection

River systems were built and are maintained by different magnitudes of discharge occurring over time and space.(Hill et al. 1991)


Protection vs. Restoration


Protection

(top-down flow)

Full Ecosystem Protection

Comprehensive Protection

Partial Protection

Threshold Protection

River systems were built and are maintained by different magnitudes of discharge occurring over time and space.(Hill et al. 1991)


Restoration

(bottom-up flow)

Full Ecosystem Protection

Comprehensive Protection

Partial Protection

Threshold Protection

River systems were built and are maintained by different magnitudes of discharge occurring over time and space.(Hill et al. 1991)


  • Maximum flow

Minimum flow

How much?


International Instream Flow Program Initiative

Tom Annear, Project Manager

Del Lobb, Midwest Coordinator

Chuck Coomer, Southeast Coordinator

Mark Woythal, Northeast Coordinator

Charles Hendry, Canadian Coordinator

Kathleen Williams, Project Coordinator

Christopher Estes, Advisor


Project Features

State and provincial F & W agencies

Funded with USFWS Multi-State Conservation Program Grant

2006 – 2008 (+)


Project Goal

… (identify) trends and opportunities that will help state and provincial fishery and wildlife management agencies develop, maintain, or improve the effectiveness of their instream flow / water management activities and programs.


Project Elements

  • Agency surveys – 2006-2007

    • Part 1: Consistency and trends with IFC policies

    • Part 2: Effectiveness of flow activities

  • Post-survey workshop – October 2007

    • Agency strategies

  • Final report – winter 2009 (www.instreamflowcouncil.org)


Project Scope

  • Legal elements

  • Public involvement

  • Institutional elements

  • Technical tools (methods)


Institutional Structure


Are instream flow / water management issues recognized in strategic planning documents?


Are water assessment tools used to prioritize water bodies in need of protection?


Legal Opportunities(State and Provincial)


Most Effective Tools

  • Reservoir management agreements

  • Detailed environmental studies

  • Hydro (FERC) licensing / re-licensing

  • 401 water quality certification

  • Federal endangered species programs


Top Agency Needs

  • More supportive regulations and policies

  • More staff (lack of expertise)

  • More actively supportive public

  • More supportive laws (insufficient laws)

  • More knowledgeable public (insufficient public values)


Workshop Results (Drivers and Strategies)

  • Legal

  • Institutional

  • Public Involvement


Legal

  • Driver: Policies, laws, and regulations don’t recognize or allow ecologically based flow regimes.

    • Update documents that identify state and federal legal opportunities

    • Frame a comprehensive model for states that can serve as a guide for developing or improving legal and institutional approaches


Institutional

  • Driver: Many state fish & wildlife agencies lack instream flow program priorities.

    • Work through AFWA to increase awareness

    • Work to increase awareness on individual agencies (by IFC and others)


Public Involvement

  • Driver - The public is not sufficiently knowledgeable of instream issues or supportive of instream values.

    • Define the audience / Refine the message

    • Make water messaging part of I&E effort


Public Involvement

  • Driver – State agencies don’t collaborate and partner enough with NGO’s and other stakeholders on water issues.

    • Engage NGO’s and others (including water users) to communicate instream flow problems and solutions to policy makers


Conclusions

  • Define success (goal)

  • Integrate key elements

    • Science

    • Institutional

    • Public involvement

    • Legal


"Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal." Henry Ford (1863-1947)


Trends, Obstacles, and Opportunities, Part II

Pre-Conference Survey


Online pre-conference survey

  • All registered attendees invited to respond

  • Seven main questions and 1 “bonus” question.

  • Response rate: 57%


Who responded?


Employment sector


Profession?


Top impediments, by sector


Top contributors to instream flow problem solving success

  • All needed stakeholders are at the table and committed to the process (51%)

  • There is strong legal and policy support for enhanced ecological flows (33%)

  • There is political support for the solution (33%)


Top contributors to instream flow problem solving failure

  • Insufficient legal or policy support for the ecological protection/restoration desired (58%)

  • Participants are too unwilling to compromise (43%)

  • Needed stakeholders are not sufficiently involved or do not participate consistently (40%)


Suggestions

  • Strengthen laws and policies

  • Communicate

  • Engage the public

  • Improve the science

  • Agencies need resources


First: Conduct research

  • Multi-disciplinary

  • Include local knowledge

  • Include stakeholders early

    • Tension between scientists and other stakeholders

    • Varying opinions about the level of authority


Then, convey results

  • Benefits of instream flow protection

  • Need for protection

  • Broad

    • “Clearly tie the improvement of instream flow to economic and public health benefits”


Gain support

  • General public

  • Attentive public

  • Officials

  • Policymakers

    • Process issues: how?

    • “Consider other’s needs carefully and try to find solutions for those most opposed to yours.”


Monitor progress

  • Consider Adaptive Management

  • Conduct and publish case studies

  • Share knowledge of what works

  • Explore creative alternatives


Conclusions

  • Science is essential but not sufficient

  • Leadership is key

  • Great need for skills in communication, negotiation

  • Value differences

  • There is no one-fits-all solution, but may be some general principles.


  • Login