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THE WORLD ENERGY COUNCIL. CITY UNIVERSITY PRESENTATION 3 October 2005 Emily Melton, World Energy Council. F oremost global multi-energy, industry-based organisation Covers all types of energy: coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, hydro, renewables UN-accredited NGO

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Presentation Transcript
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CITY UNIVERSITY PRESENTATION

3 October 2005

Emily Melton, World Energy Council

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Foremost global multi-energy, industry-based organisation

Covers all types of energy: coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, hydro, renewables

UN-accredited NGO

Impartial and objective, respected throughout the energy industry

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Established in 1923

First World Power Conference in 1924

Incorporated UK company

Registered UK charity

Headquartered in London

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Partners with

  • 45+ organisations
    • UN, World Economic Forum
    • World Bank
    • Asian, African Development Banks
    • IEA
    • OPEC, OAPEC, OLADE
    • Eurelectric
    • UPDEA
    • World LP Gas Association, WPC, IGU
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MISSION

“To promote the sustainable supply and use of energy for the greatest benefit of all people”

GOALS

The 3 A’s

Accessibility, availability, acceptability

KEY MESSAGE

Keep all energy options open

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WHO ARE WEC’S MEMBERS?

95 autonomous Member Committees

Industrialised, transitional, developing countries

92% of energy-producing, consuming countries

Committees represent country’s energy interests

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WEC’S CONSTITUENT MEMBERS

  • All energy sectors
    • Upstream, mid-stream, downstream
    • Producers, providers
    • Suppliers, distributors, retailers, end-users
    • Power plant managers
    • Energy ministers, government agencies
    • Decision-makers, policy-makers
    • Investors
    • Regulators
    • Researchers, academic institutions
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WHAT DOES WEC DO?

Authoritative reports

Research and analysis

Case studies

Medium and long-term energy projections

Benchmarking and standards

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Conferences and meetings

Technical programmes

Workshops

Regional forums

Networking sessions

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THREE-YEAR WORK CYCLES

“Top down” -- topical, current global studies

“Bottom up” -- regional projects and studies

Technical reports on ongoing energy issues

Global Energy Information System website

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2005-2007 WORK CYCLE

Global Studies

“Scenarios to 2050 “

“Climate Change”

“Survey of Energy Resources”

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2005-2007 WORK CYCLE

Technical Programmes

Performance of Generating Plant

Energy Efficiency

Financing Renewables

Cleaner Fossil Fuels

Large Grid Reliability

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2005-2007 WORK CYCLE

Regional Studies

Energy integration (Africa)

Urban energy poverty, regional integration (LAC)

Energy security, role of nuclear, energy cooperation, grid reliability (Europe)

Energy trade, diversification, efficiency (North America)

Renewables financing, energy resources (Asia)

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WORLD ENERGY CONGRESS

World\'s premier multi-energy event

5,000 delegates

Keynote addresses by top level political, business leaders

Roundtables on major energy themes and issues

Technical paper presentations by energy experts

Major exhibition

Networking sessions

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FUTURE WORLD ENERGY CONGRESSES

20th World Energy Congress (2007)

Rome, Italy

21st World Energy Congress (2010)

Montreal, Canada

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SURVEY OF ENERGY RESOURCES

WEC’s flagship publication since 1934

Triennial

Unique reserves data on coal, oil, natural gas, uranium and nuclear, renewables, peat, oil shale, tidal, OTEC, natural bitumen and extra-heavy oil, wave and wood

Expert commentary

Data tables and graphs

Country information

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SER MAIN CONCLUSIONS

Global reserves of main fossil fuels are enough for the foreseeable future

Renewable energy will grow quickly but will not increase much in share of global energy mix

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Final Energy Supply by Source

  • Oil 43%
  • Natural Gas 17%
  • Electricity 15%
  • Coal 13%
  • Other 12%
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Outlook

55% increase in global energy demand between 2000 and 2020

1998 2020 2100

Dev. Countries 35% 50% 70%

US$20 trillion (3-4% of world GDP) required for energy investment

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Oil

No. 1 energy source

Geopolitical priority

64% in the Middle East (20% in Saudi Arabia)

2% growth in consumption p.a.

R/P Ratio - 42 years

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Coal

Abundant but “dirty” (Clean coal technologies)

Total recoverable reserves: 910 billion tonnes - more than 200 years

72 countries (USA, Russia, China, Australia, India and Germany hold over 75%)

27% of global primary energy demand, 40% of electricity

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Natural Gas

  • High conversion efficiency
  • Environmentally benign
  • Geopolitical concerns
  • Europe - 40%, Middle East - 35%
  • R/P Ratio - 70 years
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Uranium and Nuclear

  • 16-17% of world’s electricity
  • Huge uranium reserves
  • 440 plants in 31 countries (end 2003)
  • Most current expansion in Asia
  • Poor public acceptance
  • High capital costs
  • Spent fuel, decommissioning
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Hydropower

The best source of renewable energy

Used in more than 150 countries

17% of world’s electricity

Carbon-free

Capital intensive

Huge potential – only 33% developed

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Wood

  • 5% of global primary energy supply
  • Wide variations between regions
    • Asia = 42%
    • Africa = 27%
    • Central & North America = 14%
    • Latin America = 10%
    • Europe = 6%
  • Important for developing and rural economies
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Bioenergy

  • Potentially the world’s largest and most sustainable fuel resource
  • Finland & Sweden = 15-20% primary energy
  • Emerging technologies
  • High operating cost
slide33

Solar Energy

  • Important energy source
  • Widely distributed
  • Relatively low conversion efficiency
  • Suitable for small-scale domestic use
  • Cultural/political challenges
  • High production costs
slide35

Wind

One of the fastest growing energy technologies

Widely available but centred in Europe

Economically competitive in remote areas

Improving technological solutions

Growing generating capacity

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Other Renewables

Peat

Geothermal Energy

Tidal Energy

Wave Energy

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

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How to Get Involved

National Member Committee

British Energy Association

2007 Youth Symposium

GEIS – www.worldenergy.org

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WORLD ENERGY COUNCIL

Regency House

1-4 Warwick Street

London W1B 5LT

United Kingdom

T: +44 20 7734 5996

F: +44 20 7734 5926

E: [email protected]

W: www.worldenergy.org

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