Story telling trees
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Story Telling Trees. By: Micki Huysken. Comprehension Skill: Noting Details. Noticing details helps us better understand our reading. Details: ~Support main ideas ~Can explain or clarify information ~Give information.

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Story Telling Trees

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Story telling trees

Story Telling Trees

By: Micki Huysken


Comprehension skill noting details

Comprehension Skill:Noting Details

Noticing details helps us better understand our reading.

Details:

~Support main ideas

~Can explain or clarify information

~Give information


Story telling trees

  • Cedar trees grow in the Alaskan forest. A Tlingit (CLING-it) Indian walks among them searching for the right one. He finds a strong, straight tree that has been growing long before his grandfather's grandfather lived there. He marks its rough bark. This is the first step in making a magnificent storytelling tree.


Stop think

Stop & Think

  • What must a tree be like to be chosen to become a story telling tree?

  • It must be strong, straight, and old.

  • If I look back into the text it also says, “a tree that has been growing long before his grandfather’s grandfather lived there.”


Story telling trees

Long ago, before writing was used by Indians, totem poles were carved to tell stories of battles or to record events happening in the tribe. Shapes of bears, wolves, whales, eagles, and other wild creatures were carved into soft tree trunks.

A storyteller read the tree from top to bottom. Stories often included animals with superhuman powers and stories about Eagle and Raven clans. These totem poles were read again and again like a library of wooden stories.


Story telling trees

Have you seen pictures of totem poles or visited the state of Alaska or Washington where poles stand? Even today, totem pole carving continues in Ketchikan, Alaska, where Tlingit Indians still live.


Story telling trees

Once, a stone adze (an ax-like tool) brought down an 80- foot giant. Today, chain saws do the work in less time. Thick bark is stripped away; then knots, once burned with hot rocks, are sanded smooth. At last, the tree is ready for the master carver chosen by the tribe. Poles that once took a year to carve can be completed in three months.


Stop think1

Stop & Think

  • What details did the author include to show that totem-pole carving today is different than it was in the past?

  • Today chain saws do the work in less time

  • Poles that once took a year to carve can be completed in three months.


Story telling trees

  • The carver chants to help his concentration and to keep a cutting rhythm. It is a chant that he learned form his father who learned it from his. Wood chips pepper the air. Animals with beaver tails, whales, wolves, and birds with oversized beaks are chiseled into the soft wood. Some carvings have human shapes. Black paint dabbed into pale wooden eyes gives them a look of power. Long ago, artist’s mixed salmon eggs with minerals like hematite, graphite, and copper to make bright-colored paint for the poles.


Story telling trees

At last, the weary carver puts down his tools. He is ready for a crane to lift the new pole. He thinks back and remembers stories of his grandfather's first pole rising. That one took place at the river's edge. No crane was used then, just dozens of men holding tightly to ropes. Their groans rippled like a chorus of bears; sweat beaded on their backs. Drums and voices swelled like thunder when the pole rose.


Stop think2

Stop & Think

  • What details show that raising a totem pole long ago was hard work?

  • “No crane was used then, just dozens of men holding tightly to ropes”

  • The author describes, “Their groans rippled like a chorus of bears; sweat beaded on their backs. Drums and voices swelled like thunder when the pole rose”


Story telling trees

The old carver blinks away the memories as a ray of sun

touches his sensitive eyes. The steel arm crane is placing his

new pole upright facing the road. Arriving visitors look up in

awe. Cheers and laughter roll forth like water from a bubbling

pot. What was once a mighty cedar growing tall in the Alaskan

forest, is now a magnificent totem pole.


Story telling trees

If you put those stories on a totem pole, what would your storytelling tree look like?


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