Broadcast meteorology lights camera science
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Broadcast Meteorology Lights, Camera, Science!!!. History of broadcasting meteorology By: Jesus Lopez. Broadcast Meteorology??.

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Broadcast Meteorology Lights, Camera, Science!!!

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Broadcast meteorology lights camera science

Broadcast Meteorology Lights, Camera, Science!!!

History of broadcasting meteorology

By: Jesus Lopez


Broadcast meteorology

Broadcast Meteorology??

  • For a better understanding, “the nature of broadcast meteorology and the general role of broadcaster provides a valuable foundation for understanding current practices related to the provision of forecast uncertainty information.” Def: - http://www.sip.ucar.edu/publications/PDF/Weather_Forecast_Uncertainty_Exploratory_Study_Demuth_BAMS.pdf

  • Meteorologist play a vital role in the broadcasting industry, playing a unique role as communicators and facilitator of weather. “they can utilize numerous communication modes (e.g., verbally, graphically, numerically), have more latitude in the terminology they use than entities like the National Weather Service (NWS), and can more readily draw on new technology and increasingly sophisticated graphics packages for enhanced storytelling.” http://www.sip.ucar.edu/publications/PDF/Weather_Forecast_Uncertainty_Exploratory_Study_Demuth_BAMS.pdf


Cleveland abbe 1838 1916

Cleveland Abbe(1838 – 1916)

  • “Abbe was a meteorologist who dedicated his life to advancing knowledge in the meteorological and climatological sciences and to establishing a network of weather reporting services.”- Cullen, Katherine. "America's First Weatherman." Weather & Climate. New York: Chelsea House, 2006. 99. Print.

  • Cleveland Abbe set up daily weather reporting for the general public and was instrumental in the creation of the National Weather Service. “Abbe had been interested in meteorology, particularly since reading the classic article, “The Motions of Fluids and Solids Relative to the Earth’s Surface,” by William Ferrel in Mathematical Monthly (1859-60). “ - Cullen, Katherine. "America's First Weatherman." Weather & Climate. New York: Chelsea House, 2006. 102. Print.


Abbe forecast s

Abbe Forecast’s

  • Cleveland Abbe, wanted to forecast at least one day in advance, to save people, property, and crops. “Meteorologist knew that storms moved eastward over the nation, temperature and humidity increased and the air pressure decreased as a storm approached..” - Cullen, Katherine. "America's First Weatherman." Weather & Climate. New York: Chelsea House, 2006. 102. Print.

  • Support

  • Abbe also established standards for system of measurements such as, barometers, thermometers, weights, and many others. In addition, Abbe played an important role establishing standard time. “Reporting the correct time was crucial for Cleveland Abbe’s weather forecasts so he could estimate when an oncoming storm might arrive, the number of hours of daylight, or what time the frost on a crop may melt.” - Cullen, Katherine. "America's First Weatherman." Weather & Climate. New York: Chelsea House, 2006. 106. Print.


Captivating an audience

Captivating an audience!

  • A nation wide survey conducted by Lazo et al. (in 2009) BAMS, revealed that, “on average, respondents get weather forecasts from local television over 33 times per month and from cable television over 18 times per month. These numbers illustrate the large audience that broadcast meteorologists reach. As a regular, tangible face of science, broadcasters have been the staple of providing weather forecast information- including uncertainty information- for decades.” -Demuth, Julie L., Betty Hearn Morrow, and Jeffrey K. Lazo. "Weather Forecast Uncertainty Information." (n.d.): n. pag. American Meteorological Society. BAMS, Nov.-Dec. 2009. Web. <http://www.sip.ucar.edu/publications/PDF/Weather_Forecast_Uncertainty_Exploratory_Study_Demuth_BAMS.pdf>.

  • As providers of information, broadcast meteorologists have developed understanding and awareness that can enlighten the broader meteorological community.


Before after broadcast meteorology

Before/After Broadcast Meteorology

Weather Channel

Initial start in the 80’s

Before Green Screen

Radio Forecast


Broadcast meteorology lights camera science

Chroma Key

“Green Screen”

News Station started using Chroma key for weather segments as technology evolved

Weather Graphics were born, after the use of Chroma key.


Evolution of broadcast meteorology

Evolution of Broadcast Meteorology

  • “Network morning shows first used news anchors to read the weather before grooming TV personalities, rather than meteorologist, fro that position.”-Davie, William R., Phillip J. Auter, and Lucian F. Dinu. "Journalism & Mass Communication Educator." Identifying the Goals of Weather Instruction: Toward a Model Approach for Broadcast Meteorology (2006): 150-51. 1 June 2006. Web. <http://jmc.sagepub.com/>.

  • During the 1990’s television started evolving, “weather began to experiment with technology, and TV stations invested impressive sums of money in computer graphics and radar systems all designed to add credibility and audience ratings to their evening newscasts.” -Davie, William R., Phillip J. Auter, and Lucian F. Dinu. "Journalism & Mass Communication Educator." Identifying the Goals of Weather Instruction: Toward a Model Approach for Broadcast Meteorology (2006): 150-51. 1 June 2006. Web. <http://jmc.sagepub.com/>.

  • Technology kept advancing, until an important question arose; “who is qualified to interpret the scientific information.?”


Qualifications anyone

Qualifications anyone??

“In 2005 a Republican Texas law-maker, Vicki Truitt, proposed a law (H.B. 577) making it a crime for weathercasters to call themselves meteorologists without the education to prove it.” -Davie, William R., Phillip J. Auter, and Lucian F. Dinu. "Journalism & Mass Communication Educator." Identifying the Goals of Weather Instruction: Toward a Model Approach for Broadcast Meteorology (2006): 150-51. 1 June 2006. Web. <http://jmc.sagepub.com/>.

Measurements have been taken in order for the general public to have a better understanding of how the weather works. Also, news stations hold credibility if a meteorologists works in their team. Rep. Truitt, states that she simply thinks that the public should know “if someone is or isn’t a meteorologist.” -Davie, William R., Phillip J. Auter, and Lucian F. Dinu. "Journalism & Mass Communication Educator." Identifying the Goals of Weather Instruction: Toward a Model Approach for Broadcast Meteorology (2006): 150-51. 1 June 2006. Web. <http://jmc.sagepub.com/>.


Job duties

Job Duties!!

  • Broadcasters are exceptional in their role as both communicators and interpreters of forecast information.

  • Flexibility and creativity in communicating their message.

  • Utilize numerous communication modes (e.g., verbally, graphically, numerically).

  • Sophisticated graphics packages for enhanced storytelling.

    INFORMATION PROVIDED BY:Demuth, Julie L., Betty Hearn Morrow, and Jeffrey K. Lazo. "Weather Forecast Uncertainty Information." (n.d.): n. pag. American Meteorological Society. BAMS, Nov.-Dec. 2009. Web. <http://www.sip.

    ucar.edu/publications/PDF/Weather_Forecast_Uncertainty_Exploratory_Study_Demuth_BAMS.pdf>.

  • In addition, broadcasters themselves have to interpret, collect, and utilize forecast information.


Employment

Employment

  • Broadcast meteorology, “one of the largest segments of the private sector within the atmospheric sciences, is a field that has considerable potential for future growth.” (BAMS article 2005) - Reynolds, Mark, Kathy Strebe, and Ada Monzon. "The Broadcast Meteorology Employment Field." BAMS. American Meteorological Society, Aug. 2008. Web. <http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/2008BAMS2533.1>.

    • Most broadcast meteorologist are employed in medium to large television markets

    • Broadcast meteorologists employed in small media markets are on average younger than those employed in larger markets

    • Public speaking and outreach are important components of the career of a broadcast meteorologist

    • Some markets require to be AMS certified or NWA certified


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