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Multidisciplinary Senior Design I. Problem Definition. Agenda. Some Introductory Comments Expected Outcomes by the End of Week 3 Clearly defined and agreed upon problem statement & project deliverables Prioritized list of needs Use scenarios Engineering Requirements

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Multidisciplinary senior design i

Multidisciplinary Senior Design I

Problem Definition


Agenda

Agenda

  • Some Introductory Comments

  • Expected Outcomes by the End of Week 3

    • Clearly defined and agreed upon problem statement & project deliverables

    • Prioritized list of needs

    • Use scenarios

    • Engineering Requirements

    • Draft of project plan

  • Tools & processes to develop expected outcomes

  • EDGE/SVN Tutorial


What is the design process

What is the Design Process?


What you should walk away with

What you should walk away with…

  • Detailed Design is about solving the correct problem

    • Elegant solutions to problems people don’t care about are meaningless

    • 1st 3-weeks are about asking the right questions

  • Solution exploration is both divergent & convergent

    • Think ‘inside’ and ‘outside’ the box

    • Iterate, iterate, iterate

    • Float between needs, specification & solutions

  • Most importantly, trust & work the process


Design process take 1

Design Process: Take 1

Problems

Quantitative

Specifications

Qualitative

System Response Variables

Needs

“Desired” Performance

Less than

Satisfied

Target

Specs

“Undesired”

Performance

System Functions

Possible Solutions

Concept

Selection

Original

Hardware

Artifact

Final

Specs

Achieved & Validated

Specs

Detail

Design

Improved

Hardware

Artifact


Design process take 11

Design Process: Take 1

Problems

Quantitative Problem Space

Quantitative

Specifications

Qualitative Problem Space

Qualitative

System Response Variables

Needs

“Desired” Performance

Less than

Satisfied

Target

Specs

“Undesired”

Performance

System Functions

Physical Solution Space

Possible Solutions

Concept

Selection

Original

Hardware

Artifact

Final

Specs

Achieved & Validated

Specs

Detail

Design

Improved

Hardware

Artifact


Design process take 1 cont

Design Process: Take 1 (cont.)

Key Take-Away: MSD Needs to be Event Driven

We are Establishing a 3-week cadence for events

So that you can finish in 32 Weeks!


The design process take 2

The Design Process: Take 2

Needs &

Problems

Modeling &

Analysis

Modeling &

Analysis

Modeling &

Analysis

Concept

Design

Subsystem

Design

Subsystem

Design

Troubleshooting =

PDCA

Finished Prototype!


Let s begin the journey

Let’s Begin the Journey!


Problem statement project deliverables

Problem Statement & Project Deliverables


P13026 problem statement

P13026 Problem Statement

A Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV) is a completely untethered device that assists a person to breathe who is incapable of breathing on their own. This device also eliminates the need for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation used by first responders during CPR, thus drastically eliminating the spread of diseases. The device should not interfere with first responders’ abilities to administer life-saving measures. A prototype was developed in 1990 that is too heavy, consumes to much energy and is not easy to use.

The goals of this project are to analyze the current design and the patent database to identify opportunities to make the device lighter, more energy efficient, easier to use, and to provide more feedback and control to the user. The expected end result is a functional prototype which can be marketed to companies and ultimately be manufactured. The resulting design and prototype need to be consistent with the intellectual property and FDA approvals that have been granted to the stakeholders in order for them to have a competitive advantage in the market.


P13026 problem statement1

P13026 Problem Statement

A Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV) is a completely untethered device that assists a person to breathe who is incapable of breathing on their own. This device also eliminates the need for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation used by first responders during CPR, thus drastically eliminating the spread of diseases. The device should not interfere with first responders’ abilities to administer life-saving measures. A prototype was developed in 1990 that is too heavy, consumes too much energy and is not easy to use.

The goals of this project are to analyze the current design and the patent database to identify opportunities to make the device lighter, more energy(?) efficient, easier to use, and to provide more feedback and control to the user. The expected end result is a functional prototype which can be marketed to companies and ultimately be manufactured. The resulting design and prototype need to be consistent with the intellectual property and FDA approvals that have been granted to the stakeholders in order for them to have a competitive advantage in the market.

Current State


P13026 statement

P13026 Statement

A Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV) is a completely untethered device that assists a person to breathe who is incapable of breathing on their own. This device also eliminates the need for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation used by first responders during CPR, thus drastically eliminating the spread of diseases. The device should not interfere with first responders’ abilities to administer life-saving measures. A prototype was developed in 1990 that is too heavy, consumes too much energy and is not easy to use.

The goals of this project are to analyze the current design and the patent database to identify opportunities to make the device lighter, more energy efficient, easier to use, and to provide more feedback and control to the user. The expected end result is a functional prototype which can be marketed to companies and ultimately be manufactured. The resulting design and prototype need to be consistent with the intellectual property and FDA approvals that have been granted to the stakeholders in order for them to have a competitive advantage in the market.

Desired State


P13026 problem statement2

P13026 Problem Statement

A Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV) is a completely untethered device that assists a person to breathe who is incapable of breathing on their own. This device also eliminates the need for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation used by first responders during CPR, thus drastically eliminating the spread of diseases. The device should not interfere with first responders’ abilities to administer life-saving measures. A prototype was developed in 1990 that is too heavy, consumes too much energy and is not easy to use.

The goals of this project are to analyze the current design and the patent database to identify opportunities to make the device lighter, more energy efficient, easier to use, and to provide more feedback and control to the user. The expected end result is a functional prototype which can be marketed to companies and ultimately be manufactured. The resulting design and prototype need to be consistent with the intellectual property and FDA approvals that have been granted to the stakeholders in order for them to have a competitive advantage in the market.

Project Goals & Key Deliverables


P13026 problem statement3

P13026 Problem Statement

A Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV) is a completely untethered device that assists a person to breathe who is incapable of breathing on their own. This device also eliminates the need for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation used by first responders during CPR, thus drastically eliminating the spread of diseases. The device should not interfere with first responders’ abilities to administer life-saving measures. A prototype was developed in 1990 that is too heavy, consumes too much energy and is not easy to use.

The goals of this project are to analyze the current design and the patent database to identify opportunities to make the device lighter, more energy(?) efficient, easier to use, and to provide more feedback and control to the user. The expected end result is a functional prototype which can be marketed to companies and ultimately be manufactured. The resulting design and prototype need to be consistent with the intellectual property and FDA approvals that have been granted to the stakeholders in order for them to have a competitive advantage in the market.

Key Constraints


How did we get there

How did we get there?


Project overview directly from prp

Project Overview (Directly from PRP)

The PEV (Portable Emergency Ventilator) is a life supporting device which quickly and efficiently provides positive pressure ventilation for a non-breathing patient. It is a contaminant free resuscitator that eliminates mouth-to-mouth procedures while permitting life saving treatment for shock, cardiac arrest, heart attack, drug overdose, drowning, smoke inhalation, and other respiratory trauma.

Emergency personnel equipped with the PEV have the opportunity to vastly improve a person’s chance of survival and avoid brain damage. Additionally PEV can be used as patient’s transport ventilator for aviation and ground transportation.

Currently the existing PEV utilizes analog circuitry, and the most advanced developments in airflow sensing techniques to produce an innovative, life-saving device. By replacing imprecise mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, it provides clean, filtered air and automatically regulates flow and pressure to suit a victim's critical needs. Additionally, the PEV’s unique “CPR mode” eliminates direct patient-rescuer contact, thereby reducing the chances of transmitting communicable diseases.

Working prototypes were built and tested successfully thus enabling to receive FDA “Permission to Market” status. In addition to military applications, the PEV can be effectively used in hospitals, clinics, emergency and security vehicles as well as private homes.

The Project is based on US patents entitled Portable Emergency Respirator #5,211,170 and # 5,398,676 authored by Roman Press and Jeff Gutterman and their FDA 510K approval to manufacture and market the device. A full working prototype of the ventilator based on now outdated technology serves as a useful example and inspiration for a revised and updated model. The product has a number of unique features including a CPR mode which allows the machine to work in synch with a person administering CPR and an integral sterilizer to provide clean air without any biological contaminations.

The goal of the proposed project is the creation of light weight state-of-the-art digital electronic PEV version. This multidisciplinary project can create a positive RIT image as a new technology developer, and may potentially prove to be financially advantageous to RIT as well.


Portable emergency ventilator pev current state

Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV):Current State

  • Assist Unresponsive Patient to Breathe

  • Integrate into the CPR Process

  • It must not interfere with the administration of life-saving measures

  • It must be portable

Desired

Attributes

As a team, take 10 minutes to identify the Desired Attributes and the Undesired States

Problems/

Undesired

State

  • Out Dated Technology

Current

PEV


Team problem statement from edge

Team Problem Statement (from EDGE)

A Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV) is a device that can provide positive pressure ventilation to a person who is incapable of breathing on their own. This device can eliminate the need for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation used by first responders during CPR, thus drastically eliminating the spread of diseases. The device can also be used when transporting patients or in home use when a large ventilator is too expensive and impractical.

This project focuses on improving a PEV developed in the early 1990s by Jeff Gutterman and Roman Press (shown on right below). The goal of this project is to update the model using technology available today by making it lighter, more efficient, easier to use, and provide more feedback. The expected end result is a functional prototype (shown on left below) which can be marketed to companies and be manufactured.


Modified problem statement

Modified Problem Statement

A Portable Emergency Ventilator (PEV) is a completely untethered device that assists a person to breathe who is incapable of breathing on their own. This device also eliminates the need for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation used by first responders during CPR, thus drastically eliminating the spread of diseases. The device should not interfere with first responders’ abilities to administer life-saving measures. A prototype was developed in 1990 that is too heavy, consumes too much energy and is not easy to use.

The goals of this project are to analyze the current design and the patent database to identify opportunities to make the device lighter, more energy efficient, easier to use, and to provide more feedback and control to the user. The expected end result is a functional prototype which can be marketed to companies and ultimately be manufactured. The resulting design and prototype need to be consistent with the intellectual property and FDA approvals that have been granted to the stakeholders in order for them to have a competitive advantage in the market.


Project deliverables

Project Deliverables

  • Functional prototype which can be marketed to companies and can be the basis for a product that will ultimately be manufactured

  • Appropriate design, test, manufacturing and supply chain documentation to support transition to a manufactured product

  • Test data verifying correct operation

  • Designs alternatives

    • Other possible configurations

    • Other possible use environments

  • User’s guide for operation


Recap

Recap

  • A good problem statement contains

    • A description of the current state

    • A vision of the desired state

    • Key goals and deliverables

    • Key constraints


Needs elicitation

Needs Elicitation


Desired needs list

Desired Needs List


Goals of needs identification

Goals of Needs Identification

  • Provide basis for PD decisions

  • Elicit needs that may not be so obvious

  • Provide basis for specifications

  • Ensure critical needs are elicited

  • Develop a common understanding of the needs

  • Archiving of needs

Ulrich,K.T. and S. Eppinger, Product Design and Development, Third Edition, 2004


Steps in identifying customer needs

Steps in Identifying Customer Needs

  • Gather the raw data

  • Interpret the raw data

  • Organize the needs

  • Establish relative importance of needs

  • Sanity Check!

Ulrich,K.T. and S. Eppinger, Product Design and Development, Third Edition, 2004


Identify the stakeholders

Identify the Stakeholders


Raw needs data used for p13026

Raw Needs Data Used for P13026

  • PRP

  • Interviews of

    • Inventors

    • EMTs

      • RIT Student

      • External

  • Benchmarking

    • Other PEVs

    • PTO


Eliciting customer needs

Eliciting Customer Needs

  • Prepare an interview guide

  • Elicit dialog on a particular task or problem

    • Have them walk through a specific instance

      • Don’t ask them to generalize!

      • Better yet, have them show you

  • Go with the flow

  • Use visual stimuli and props

  • Avoid leading questions

    • Avoid yes/no questions

    • Be prepared for latent needs

  • Focus on the customer pain

    • What’s the underlying problem that needs to be solved

  • Document, Document, Document


What a team should know after the customer interview

What a team should know after the customer interview

  • What is (are)…

    • project about? the problem? the opportunity? deliverables? constraints?

  • Why…

    • are we doing this? motivation? Higher level goals (profit, productivity, etc.)? commercialization?

  • When…

    • key milestones? time constraints? is client available and not available? (& how) interact with the client?

  • Who is (are)…

    • Is client? Stakeholders? Approves? Funds? Uses?

  • How…

    • Be careful here, how’s are not needs, but you should understand client’s preconceived notions about the solution


Developing needs statements guidelines for interpreting the data

Developing Needs Statements:Guidelines for Interpreting the Data

  • Understand the value proposition

    • Your product is solving some problems

      • What are they?

      • What value do you allow your customer to deliver?

  • Stay close to the customer language

  • What, not how

  • Specificity equal to the raw data

  • Positive, not negative

  • Product Attribute

  • Avoid “must” & “should”

Ulrich,K.T. and S. Eppinger, Product Design and Development, Third Edition, 2004


Team s cut at needs

Team’s Cut at Needs

3 – Must Have; 2 – Nice to Have ; 1 – Preference Only


Establish relative importance of needs development team consensus

Establish Relative Importance of Needs:Development Team Consensus


Sanity check

Sanity Check

  • Did you miss any key stakeholders?

  • Are there any areas that you need to follow-up on or get more information?

  • What do we know now that we didn’t before? Surprises?


Use scenarios

Use Scenarios


Unresponsive patient heart beating but not breathing

Unresponsive patient, heart beating but not breathing


Step 1 identify scenarios

Step 1: Identify Scenarios

  • Scenario 1: Unresponsive patient, heart beating but not breathing – PEV assist and transport to hospital

  • Scenario 2: Unresponsive patient, heart beating but not breathing – PEV assist and administer life-saving measure X

  • Scenario 3: Unresponsive patient, heart not beating and not breathing – PEV assist and CPR


Step 2 think through p rocess steps

Step 2: Think Through Process Steps


Step 3 create workflow map

Step 3: Create Workflow Map


Wrap up

Wrap-Up


Homework

Homework

  • Revisit/refine problem statement

  • Prepare for customer interview

    • understand objectives, constraints, assumptions; needs and relative importance

  • EDGE/SVN tutorial with embedded questions to answer

  • Update project website on EDGE

    • by Thurs at 8am

    • problem statement, questions posted for customer.

  • Read PRP for P13026


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