Presentation on partnership regional development
Download
1 / 77

rship/Regional Development - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 360 Views
  • Uploaded on

Presentation on Partnership/Regional Development. Best Practices Session August 23 and 24, 2004 Vancouver, B.C. Atiik Askii Adventures . An Initiative of the Northwest Manitoba Community Futures Development Corporation.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'rship/Regional Development' - elina


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Presentation on partnership regional development l.jpg
Presentation on Partnership/Regional Development

Best Practices Session

August 23 and 24, 2004

Vancouver, B.C.


An initiative of the northwest manitoba community futures development corporation l.jpg

Atiik Askii

Adventures

An Initiative of the Northwest Manitoba Community FuturesDevelopment Corporation


Slide3 l.jpg

Since the beginning of time, people have banded together to take on various missions to transform the present and build the future.

When we decide to be social pioneers, we take on our own mission. We don’t just have a mission. Like the astronauts heading for the moon, we are the mission.

The Courage to Lead

R. Brian Stanfield


The northwest manitoba region l.jpg
The Northwest Manitoba Region take on various missions to transform the present and build the future.

  • 20% of the geographic

    landmass of Manitoba

  • 1% of its population

  • Severely depressed

    economic conditions


The northwest manitoba regional tourism strategy l.jpg
The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy take on various missions to transform the present and build the future.


The 4 phases of the strategy l.jpg
The 4 Phases of the Strategy take on various missions to transform the present and build the future.

  • Phase One: Current State Analysis

  • Phase Two: Two Rounds of Community Consultation Workshops

  • Phase Three: Three Regional Tourism Committee Meetings

  • Phase Four: Implementation


Slide7 l.jpg

  • The take on various missions to transform the present and build the future.Phase 1 Report of The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy was concluded in May 2003.

Download copies of this report at www.northwestcfdc.com


Slide8 l.jpg


Slide9 l.jpg

The second round of community consultation visits began on March 12 2004 and ended on April 7 2004.

The second RTC meeting took place in Lynn Lake on April 21 2004.

The third and final RTC meeting occurred on May 5 2004.

Implementation of Phase 4 began on June 1 2004 and is scheduled continue indefinitely from this point on.


The communities involved in developing the strategy l.jpg
The Communities Involved in Developing the Strategy March 12 2004 and ended on April 7 2004.

Tadoule Lake (Sayisi Dene First Nation)

Lac Brochet (Northlands First Nation)

Brochet/Barren Lands First Nation (BLFN)

Kinoosao (Thomas Clark Reserve)

Lynn Lake

Leaf Rapids

Granville Lake

Pickerel Narrows First Nation

Marcel Colomb First Nation (MCFN)

South Indian Lake/O-Pipon-Na-Piwin Cree Nation (SIL/OPCN)

Pukatawagan (Mathias Colomb Cree Nation [MCCN])


Slide11 l.jpg


Slide12 l.jpg

  • The 1 – 2 day workshops that resulted were devoted to building consensus for The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy across the region.

  • In addition to identifying an overall “summer” and “winter” tourism development project that would benefit every community in Northwest Manitoba, several of the LTC’s also identified local tourism development projects to implement in their immediate areas.


Slide13 l.jpg

  • The LTC participants were asked to elect or appoint a representative to sit on the RTC.

  • In addition, members of the LTC’s were given three handouts: a draft action planning workbook for tourism development, a tourism development workbook (which was a hybrid version of the first handout) and a “Draft” Criteria and Guidelines for tourism development in Northwest Manitoba.


Slide14 l.jpg


Developing consensus for the strategy l.jpg
Developing Consensus for the Strategy LTC’s with the scope and nature of

  • The consultation process used to build community consensus for the regional strategy was first pioneered by the Canadian Institute of Cultural Affairs (ICA).


Slide16 l.jpg

4. Develop Action Plans LTC’s with the scope and nature of

that capture the intention(s)

of the Strategic Directions

1. Define a

Practical Vision

for the Future

of Tourism

in Northwest Manitoba

3. Develop Strategic

Directions

to overcome

the Underlying

Obstacles

2. Identify Underlying

Obstacles that are standing

in the way of achieving

the Practical Vision


Slide17 l.jpg

1. Define a LTC’s with the scope and nature of

Practical Vision

for the Future

of Tourism

in Northwest Manitoba


Slide18 l.jpg

1. Define a LTC’s with the scope and nature of

Practical Vision

for the Future

of Tourism

in Northwest Manitoba

3. Develop Strategic

Directions

to overcome

the Underlying

Obstacles

2. Identify Underlying

Obstacles that are standing

in the way of achieving

the Practical Vision


Slide19 l.jpg

4. Develop Action Plans LTC’s with the scope and nature of

that capture the intention(s)

of the Strategic Directions

1. Define a

Practical Vision

for the Future

of Tourism

in Northwest Manitoba

3. Develop Strategic

Directions

to overcome

the Underlying

Obstacles

2. Identify Underlying

Obstacles that are standing

in the way of achieving

the Practical Vision


What is consensus l.jpg
What Is Consensus? LTC’s with the scope and nature of

  • For the purposes of developing The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy, consensus was defined as “at least partial agreement” with the decisions that were reached by the stakeholder groups.


Slide21 l.jpg

  • This distinguished consensus from both majority decision making (group environments that can see as many as one less than half the total number of people in the groups completely disagreeing with the decisions) and unanimity (group environments that allow for no disagreement at all).


Slide22 l.jpg

  • By ensuring making (group environments that can see as many as one less than half the total number of people in the groups completely disagreeing with the decisions) and unanimity (group environments that allow for no disagreement at all).at least partial agreement with the decisions, consensus left lots of room for disagreement, discussion and growth, but grounded the stakeholder groups in a common sense of vision and purpose.


Round 1 phase 1 community consultation workshops l.jpg
Round 1, Phase 1 Community Consultation Workshops making (group environments that can see as many as one less than half the total number of people in the groups completely disagreeing with the decisions) and unanimity (group environments that allow for no disagreement at all).

  • The Phase 1 Inventory and Situational Analysis Final Report identified Aboriginal Tourism, Adventure Travel Tourism, Eco-Tourism and Winter Tourism as potential tourism development markets for Northwest Manitoba. The report indicated that hunters and fishers tourism was fairly well established in the area.


Slide24 l.jpg


Slide25 l.jpg

  • In addition, the Northwest CFDC Phases 2 and 3 Implementation Team broke Adventure Travel Tourism down into two categories instead of one (Hard Adventure Travel and Soft Adventure Travel) and added one more category—“Other”—to the list. This last category was intended to identify potential tourism development activities that could not be fully captured under the other categories. “Other” also included such things as “Infrastructure Improvement”


Slide26 l.jpg

  • A total of 259 ideas for local and regional tourism development activities were generated during the course of conducting the first round of community consultation visioning workshops.

  • Of these, the highest number of ideas were clustered under “Winter Tourism” (54, or 20.8% of the total number of ideas that were generated), while the lowest was “Soft Adventure Travel Tourism” (20, or 7.7% of the total number of ideas that were generated).


Slide27 l.jpg

  • Interestingly, those LTC’s that selected tourism development projects to implement in their areas chose projects that fit into the middle to lower end of this scale, rather than the higher end.

  • Most significant of all was that fact that over 40% chose “Other” tourism development ventures to pursue and these could more properly be understood as “Infrastructure Improvement”.


Slide28 l.jpg

  • The Northwest CFDC Phases 2 and 3 Implementation Team understood this 40% as implying that there is a need for improvement in the basic business services and municipal infrastructures in most communities in the region. As well, basic communication technology seems to be required in most communities as are improvements in the transportation infrastructures that tie most of the communities together.


Phase 3 first regional tourism committee meeting l.jpg
Phase 3: First Regional Tourism Committee Meeting understood this 40% as implying that there is a need for improvement in the basic business services and municipal infrastructures in most communities in the region. As well, basic communication technology seems to be required in most communities as are improvements in the transportation infrastructures that tie most of the communities together.

  • In conducting the Practical Vision brainstorming exercise, the Northwest CFDC Phases 2 and 3 Implementation Team had the convenience of 7 ready-made categories under which to cluster the 259 ideas that were generated. Unfortunately, this was not the case with brainstorming for Underlying Obstacles or Strategic Directions. In fact, the categories under which to cluster ideas for both these brainstorming sessions had to be generated at the same time as the brainstorming activities occurred.


Slide30 l.jpg

  • A total of 196 Underlying Obstacles were identified during the Round 1, Phase 2 community consultation visioning workshops. These were clustered under 48 different categories.

  • Participants at the first RTC meeting regrouped these 48 categories under 9 regional classifications to produce a hybrid version of the major roadblocks that stood in the way of achieving the Practical Vision of the LTC’s.


Underlying obstacles l.jpg
Underlying Obstacles the Round 1, Phase 2 community consultation visioning workshops. These were clustered under 48 different categories.

  • Bureaucracy

  • Mind-Set

  • Human Resources Development

  • Location


Slide32 l.jpg

  • Infrastructure the Round 1, Phase 2 community consultation visioning workshops. These were clustered under 48 different categories.

  • Funding

  • Leadership

  • Environmental Impacts

  • Marketing and Communication


Strategic directions l.jpg
Strategic Directions the Round 1, Phase 2 community consultation visioning workshops. These were clustered under 48 different categories.

  • A total of 165 proposals for Strategic Directions were identified during the course of implementing the community consultation visioning workshops.

  • These 165 Strategic Directions were clustered under 44 categories. Participants at the first RTC meeting regrouped the Strategic Directions categories under 9 regional classifications. These served as hybrid proposals to overcome the Underlying Obstacles standing in the way of achieving the Practical Vision of the LTC’s.


Slide34 l.jpg

  • Training the Round 1, Phase 2 community consultation visioning workshops. These were clustered under 48 different categories.

  • Capacity Building

  • Advocacy

  • Co-Management

  • Planning


Slide35 l.jpg

  • Marketing the Round 1, Phase 2 community consultation visioning workshops. These were clustered under 48 different categories.

  • Funding

  • Infrastructure

  • Commitment


Phase 3 first regional tourism committee meeting principles of sustainable economic development l.jpg
Phase 3: First Regional Tourism Committee Meeting: Principles of Sustainable Economic Development

  • The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy is a sustainable economic development initiative. Hence, in formalizing the strategy, the RTC took into consideration the four distinguishing qualities of sustainable economic development practices and two basic principles of economic development itself.


Sustainable economic development l.jpg
Sustainable Economic Development Principles of Sustainable Economic Development

SERV

  • Social responsibility

  • Ecological sensitivity

  • Cultural respect

  • Economic viability


Two principles of successful economic development l.jpg
Two Principles of Successful Economic Development Principles of Sustainable Economic Development

Primary Industry

Secondary Industry

Service Industry


Two principles of successful economic development39 l.jpg
Two Principles of Successful Economic Development Principles of Sustainable Economic Development

Brings new money into the community and/or region

Outside economy

Maintains a connection

with the outside community

Circulates the money

as often as possible

Retains the money in the community

for as long as possible


1 strategy to export northwest manitoba arts and crafts l.jpg
1. Strategy to Export Northwest Manitoba Arts and Crafts Principles of Sustainable Economic Development

  • Exposing tourists to Northwest Manitoba Arts and Crafts has always been understood as a way to bring new money into this region. However, the process by which tourists are exposed to Northwest Manitoba Arts and Crafts has always been seen as a function of tourists visiting the communities in the area.


Slide41 l.jpg


Slide42 l.jpg

  • The Leaf Rapids National Exhibition Centre in Leaf Rapids (LRNEC) has expressed an interest in operating as a centralized marketing location for Northwest Manitoba Arts and Crafts products. The LRNEC will export these products to Southern Manitoba and perhaps to points beyond.

  • The local tourism committees will form local arts and crafts cooperatives in each of the communities in the region.


Slide43 l.jpg

  • These cooperatives will purchase the works of local artists and craft persons. The arts and crafts will be identified with a trademark as proof of authenticity. After markup, the cooperatives will sell the products to the LRNEC.

  • From there, the products will be marketed to a variety of retail outlets/arts community locations in other parts of the province. Initial marketing strategies will focus solely on Manitoba. Future strategies may expand marketing campaigns to other parts of Canada and/or overseas.


2 strategy to export the adventure travel tourism experience l.jpg
2. Strategy to Export the Adventure Travel Tourism Experience

  • The RTC reached consensus on mapping out 1) summer adventure travel canoe routes and 2) winter adventure snowmobile trails that will that will encircle the entire region and link every community. The objective of doing this is to create an adventure travel environment that will increase tourist traffic in Northwest Manitoba.


Slide45 l.jpg

  • The urgent need for infrastructure improvement is an implicit component of this notion of mapping out a summer and winter adventure travel excursion product development package for Northwest Manitoba. It might even be understood as a product development initiative on its own. Most communities suffer from the lack of basic communication technology and it may not be possible for them to attract and host tourists.


Slide46 l.jpg


Slide47 l.jpg

  • This product development strategy calls for an advanced level of resource co-management activities on the part of the Regional Tourism Committee. Current land users will become vital players in developing the canoe routes and snowmobile trails, for example, and mechanisms to control tourist access to, and traffic along, the canoe and snowmobile routes will have to be formalized, put in place and enforced.


Slide48 l.jpg

  • Finally, this product development strategy assumes that the canoe and snowmobile routes will raise the tourism profile in Northwest Manitoba to at least the status of a secondary industry. Hence, it is anticipated that the number of spin-off service industry tourism businesses in the region will swell as a result.


3 risk management strategy in bound tour operator l.jpg
3. Risk Management Strategy: canoe and snowmobile routes will raise the tourism profile in Northwest Manitoba to at least the status of a secondary industry. Hence, it is anticipated that the number of spin-off service industry tourism businesses in the region will swell as a result.In-Bound Tour Operator

  • Risk management is understood as project/program governance, executive and administration systems that are put in place to reduce the threat of project/program failure. Certainly, an initiative that is the size and scope of The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy requires that some serious thought be given to monitoring and managing the implementation process.


Slide50 l.jpg

“Dream Catcher”


Slide51 l.jpg

  • The RTC will function as the “In-Bound Tourist Operator” for The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy. The fact that every community in Northwest Manitoba has a representative on the RTC ensures that every community is “buying into” the project. The RTC/In-Bound Tourist Operator will ensure that timelines are being met, activities are proceeding according to schedule, land use issues are being addressed, etc.


Round 2 phase 2 community consultation visits l.jpg
Round 2, Phase 2 Community Consultation Visits Operator” for

  • Each of the LTC’s committed to circulating a survey in their communities. The survey was intended to identify artists and crafts persons in the region who are interested in having their work marketed in other parts of the province and country.


Slide53 l.jpg

“Vision Quest”


Slide54 l.jpg


The 2 nd and 3 rd regional tourism committee meetings l.jpg
The 2 routes and snowmobile trails in designated areas of the Northwest Manitoba Region. Both regional and local snowmobile trails and canoe routes were mapped.nd and 3rd Regional Tourism Committee Meetings

  • The 2nd and 3rd RTC meetings were devoted to:

  • A. Completing the mapping of the canoe routes and snowmobile trails.


Slide56 l.jpg

  • B. Discussing the budget and the overall timelines and activities schedule for implementing Phase 4 of The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy. The representatives at the 2nd RTC meeting agreed that the Northwest CFDC Phases 2 and 3 Implementation team should develop a budget and timelines and activities schedule for approval at the 3rd RTC meeting.


Slide57 l.jpg

  • C. Naming the organization. After considerable brainstorming, the RTC representatives unanimously agreed that the incorporated name of the organization should be, “Northwest Atihk Askii Adventures Inc.” Loosely translated, “Atiik Askii” is a Cree phrase meaning “Land of the Caribou”.


Slide58 l.jpg

  • D. Finally, during the 3 brainstorming, the RTC representatives unanimously agreed that the incorporated name of the organization should be, “Northwest Atihk Askii Adventures Inc.” Loosely translated, “Atiik Askii” is a Cree phrase meaning “Land of the Caribou”.rd RTC meeting, a draft of the final report and power point presentation of The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy were unanimously approved.

Download copies of this report at www.northwestcfdc.com


Project cost l.jpg
Project Cost brainstorming, the RTC representatives unanimously agreed that the incorporated name of the organization should be, “Northwest Atihk Askii Adventures Inc.” Loosely translated, “Atiik Askii” is a Cree phrase meaning “Land of the Caribou”.

  • Estimated start-up costs for the first three years of implementing The Northwest Manitoba Regional Tourism Strategy is $1.3 million.


The inter relationship of provincial tourism development activities l.jpg

Three entry and exit points ensure that Atiik Askii Adventures is an integral part of tourism development activities in other parts of the province.

The Manitoba Aboriginal Tourism Strategy.

The Inter-Relationship of Provincial Tourism Development Activities


Conclusion l.jpg
Conclusion Adventures is an integral part of tourism development activities in other parts of the province.

  • There is a story they tell about the Caribou. Some say they migrate because of a restless spirit. These wanderers are after something that is forever beyond their reach.


Slide62 l.jpg

  • While this may or may not be true, it is certainly not the whole truth. Another, less poetic take the reality of the Caribou, is that they migrate from place to place in search of the resources to keep themselves alive. The Caribou move away from one area after the resources there are gone. They return when the resources have replenished themselves.


Slide63 l.jpg


Slide64 l.jpg


Slide65 l.jpg

  • These first people were nomadic. They settled in an area that was rich in natural resources and moved on again once those resources had been exhausted. They repeated this process over and over again, moving freely from place to place. Later on, when enough time had elapsed for the resources of their original settlement to renew themselves, they would move back there again—and the cycle would begin to repeat itself.


Slide66 l.jpg


Slide67 l.jpg


Slide68 l.jpg


Slide69 l.jpg

  • The introduction of the inland trading posts abruptly put an end to this. Brochet/Barren Lands First Nation, Pukatawagan, Granville Lake and South Indian Lake became permanent communities that did not rely on the natural resources of the area. They now had a new resource—the inland trading post itself. They were permanent whether the natural resources in the area could support them or not.


Slide70 l.jpg

  • Shortly, the first people from the other settlements started travelling to the inland trading posts. This resulted in the permanent disruption of customary migration, trading and settlement patterns in the region. Control over the economic development of Northwest Manitoba passed from the hands of the people who lived here to the hands of outsiders. Now, the fur traders were calling the shots.


Slide71 l.jpg

  • This situation has lasted to this day. The economic development of this region lies primarily in the hands of outside influences. In the fish and fur harvesting industry, for example, prices are established outside this region and the demand for the products themselves are subject to impact by forces outside Northwest Manitoba.


Slide72 l.jpg

  • And it doesn’t just affect traditional forms of earning a living. If outside influences want electricity and ore, for instance, concrete dams are constructed and mines shafts are sunk. The people who live here have little control over these developments. Worse, Northwest Manitoba residents—both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal—have never been first in line when it comes to getting the jobs that these mega-projects create.


Slide73 l.jpg


Slide74 l.jpg

  • In developing the strategy, the guiding principles of sustainable economic development practices (SERV) were strictly adhered to. The consensus building process that was used resulted in an unparalleled level cooperation, collaboration and agreement between First Nations, Metis and industrial communities in the region. This level of mutual respect, understanding and regard for each other is unique in this area.


Slide75 l.jpg

  • During the course of conducting the community consultation visioning workshops and the regional Tourism Committee meetings, the Northwest CFDC Phases 2 and 3 Implementation team heard the same comment repeated over and over again. At the end of the brainstorming sessions, someone was apt to say, “We already knew all this.”


Slide76 l.jpg

  • This is true. As individuals, we already knew what we ended up brainstorming. What we didn’t recognize was the fact that we also knew it as a group of 13 far-flung and vastly different communities. We didn’t know that we all agreed—at least partially—on a strategy that would return control over the sustainable economic development of this region back into to the hands of the people who live here.

  • This is the land of the Caribou.


For further information l.jpg

Northwest Manitoba Community Futures Development Corporation (Northwest CFDC)

PO Box 188, 489 Sherritt Avenue, Lynn Lake MB R0B 0W0

(204) 356-2489

Toll Free: 1-888-696-2332

Fax: (204) 356-2785

E-Mail: [email protected]

Web Site:

www.northwestcfdc.com

For Further Information:


ad