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PRO-POOR FORESTRY IN CAMEROON PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Commonwealth Policy Studies Unit (CPSU) London Workshop on ‘Pro-Poor Forestry and Carbon Finance in the Commonwealth’ 01 – 02 September 2008. PRO-POOR FORESTRY IN CAMEROON. PRISCILLIA LINGONDO REGIONAL CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENT & CONSERVATION (RCDC) LIMBE, SOUTH WEST PROVINCE, CAMEROON. AND

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Commonwealth Policy Studies Unit (CPSU) London

Workshop on ‘Pro-Poor Forestry and Carbon Finance in the Commonwealth’

01 – 02 September 2008

PRO-POOR FORESTRY IN CAMEROON

PRISCILLIA LINGONDO

REGIONAL CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENT & CONSERVATION (RCDC) LIMBE,

SOUTH WEST PROVINCE, CAMEROON

AND

EMMANUEL O. NUESIRI

OXFORD UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT (OUCE) &

COMMONWEALTH POLICY STUDIES UNIT (CPSU) LONDON


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CAMEROON

  • Population (2008 estimate): 18 million

  • Surface area: 475,000 km²

  • Area covered by forests: 50%

  • Main economic activity: Agriculture

  • Economic situation: Highly Indebted

  • Political situation: Stable fledgling democracy


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CLIMATE

Debundschalying on the western flanks of Mt Cameroon with about 10,000mm of rain per year is the 2nd rainiest place on the planet after Chirapunji in India.


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FORESTS

According to FAO (2003) statistics:

Type: Tropical moists (with montane forest in Cameroon highlands)

Extent: 23.8 million Ha or 51.3% of land area in Cameroon

Plantations: 80,000 Ha (marginal role in forestry sector)

Annual rate of change in forest cover 1990 – 2000: –0.9%

Annual net loss: 222,000 Ha during the decade

Volume of wood in forest: 135 m3/Ha

Commercial species: Ayous(Triplochiton scleroxylon), Sapelli

(Etandrophragma cylindricum) and Azobe(Lophira alata), Frake (Terminalia superba) and Iroko (Milicia/Chlorophora excelsa) – representing about 75% of Cameroon’s timber production.


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PRO-POOR FORESTRY

  • FOREST FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

    • Trade worth up to £1,000,000/yr

  • HONEY AND BEE PRODUCTS

    • Trade worth more than £1000,000/yr

  • ROYALTIES FROM WILDLIFE AND TIMBER EXTRACTION

    • Shared in a 5:4:1 ratio between government, local municipalities and concerned villages

  • COMMUNITY FORESTS

    • About 100 covering 400,000 hectares

    • Revenue - (per year and per adult): (i) predominantly timber US$32 (ii) partly timber US$6 (iii) predominantly NTFP US$5.6.

  • ECO-TOURISM

    • No national data but of growing interest for job creation


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BIMBIA-BONADIKOMBO COMMUNITY FOREST

Location: South East flanks of Mt. Cameroon

Type 2 community forest:partly timber, expected to yield aboutUS$6/person/yr


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BIMBIA-BONADIKOMBO COMMUNITY FOREST

Farming – Oil palm

Signpost on forest edge

Timber for local market

Charcoal for local market

Eco-tourism

Hunting – seized guns


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PRO-POOR FORESTRY - CHALLENGES

  • Policy

    • Disharmony between the Forestry Law and the Land Tenure Code

    • Multiplicity of texts and lack of administrative co-ordination and information

  • Governance

    • Poor accountability, transparency and equity amongst the different actors/ stakeholders at different scales including gender insensitivity

  • Knowledge base

    • Ignorance of policy requirement amongst local people and forestry department staff

    • Acute shortage of skillful managers at different scales

  • Market

    • Informal, poorly understood, poorly regulated, poorly financed

    • Low levels of inventiveness (poor adaptability) vis-à-vis product processing and marketing

  • Lack of local ownership

    • High application and management transaction cost vis-à-vis capacity of local groups

    • Embedding of NGOs as mid-wives and proxy representatives of local interests

  • Heightened sense of insecurity due to changing weather patterns

    • There is deep concern at local level about changes in rainfall pattern

  • Elite interest and capture of pro-poor initiatives


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SOLUTIONS

  • Political will

  • Research

    • Regional and export market research

  • Education, education, education

    • Regular capacity building courses, workshops, seminars at all scales

    • Programme to enhance inventiveness of local groups

    • Management training tailored for local groups

    • Need to move beyond lip-service to gender concerns

    • Need for tailored climate change and adaptability education

  • Finance

    • Simpler, more accessible financial support for local groups


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THE ROLE OF CARBON FINANCE

  • Lobby government to work towards policy coherence

  • Provide funds for tree ‘planting and management’ programmes with local groups

  • Support initiatives that promote local innovation in exchange for local commitment to forest protection

    • There is still a lot of room for better soil management in Cameroon’s forest zones which could lead to appreciable reduced deforestation


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THANK YOU FOR YOUR KIND ATTENTION!


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