The Economic Value of Beaches
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The Economic Value of Beaches Travel and tourism is the largest industry in the world and U.S. (Contributing $3.5 trillion to the world’s Gross Domestic Product – GDP - and $1.2 trillion to the U.S. GDP). World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001

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Travel and tourism is the largest industry

in the world and U.S.

(Contributing $3.5 trillion to the world’s Gross Domestic Product – GDP - and $1.2 trillion to the U.S. GDP).

World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001


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Travel and tourism is the largest employer in the world and U.S.

(Employing 16.9 million people, or

1 out of every 8.1 people, in the U.S.)

World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001


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Spending by U.S.foreign tourists supports 2.7 million American jobs - as many jobs as

are in the U.S. computer industry.

Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2001


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“Technology jobs account for little of total employment in most local economies and don’t do much to boost a region’s overall prosperity.”

Council on Competitiveness, 2001


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Per-capita wages for travel and tourism jobs are 13% higher than average U.S. per-capita wages.

Holecek and Herbowicz, 1995


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Travel and tourism contributes about than average U.S. per-capita wages.

$200 billion to U.S. exports

(Greater than the combined export value

of U.S. agricultural products, aircraft, computers, and telecommunications equipment).

World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2001


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Foreign visitors to the U.S. produced a than average U.S. per-capita wages.

trade surplus of $13.9 billion

(Greater than any trade component including agricultural exports).

World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001

U.S. Department of Commerce,2001


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Americans take pride in high-technology industries, but these industries ran a trade deficit of $35 billion in 2000.

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2001


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Foreign tourism these industries ran a trade deficit of $35 billion in 2000. provides annual tax revenues of $7.5 billion.

U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration,1995

(T&T Admin abolished by Congress in 1996)


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Foreign Tourism these industries ran a trade deficit of $35 billion in 2000.

Annual Tax Revenues

State

33.0%

$2.5 Billion

$4 Billion

$1 Billion

Federal

53.0%

Local

14.0%

U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, 1995


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Beaches are the leading tourist destination in the U.S. these industries ran a trade deficit of $35 billion in 2000.

USA Today, 1993

Carlson Wagonlit Travel Agent Poll, 1998

ABC News, 2000

Washingtonpost.com: Poll, 2001



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Annual Tourist Visits in the U.S.

(Millions)

California Beaches

National Park Service *

Bureau of Land Management **

0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700

  • Includes national seashores and monuments

  • Properties are one-eighth of U.S. land

*

**

King and Symes, 2002

National Park Service, 2001

Bureau of Land Management, 2001


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Annual Tourist Visits in the U.S.

(Millions)

National Beach Visits

National Parks

Bureau of Land

Management

State Parks

0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000

Clean Beaches Council, 2001

National Park Service, 2001

Bureau of Land Management, 2001


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California State beaches make up just 2.7% of State parks but have 72% of park visits.

King, 1999


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Beach tourists but have 72% of park visits. contribute $260 billion to the U.S. economy and $60 billion in Federal taxes.

King, 1999

Clean Beaches Council, 2001

World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001


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Beach erosion is the number one concern that beach tourists have about beaches.

Hall and Staimer, 1995


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Germany has spent 6 times as much on its beaches over the past 40 years as has the U.S.

Kelletat, 1992


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Japan spends more in a single year on shore protection and restoration than the U.S. has in 40 years.

Marine Facilities Panel, 1991


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Spain spent more on beach nourishment over a 5-year period than the U.S. spent in 40 years.

Ministerio de Obras Publicas y Transportes, 1993


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Miami Beach Experience than the U.S. spent in 40 years.


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Beach attendance at Miami Beach following beach nourishment in the late 1970’s increased from 8 million in 1978 to 21 million in 1983.

Wiegel, 1992


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Annual Tourist Visits in the late 1970’s increased from

(Millions)

Miami Beach (1983)

Yosemite (2001)

Grand Canyon (2001)

Yellowstone (2001)

0 5 10 15 20 25

Wiegel, 1992

National Park Service, 2001


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Foreign beach tourists in the late 1970’s increased from spend $500 annually ($1.2 billion) for every $1 spent on the annual capitalized cost of the Miami Beach nourishment project

City of Miami Beach, 2001

Houston, 1996

Stronge, 2000


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If the Miami Beach experience could be successfully repeated, an investment of 1% of the annual crop subsidy in national beach restoration would wipe out the average annual U.S. trade deficit.

Houston, 2002

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2001


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Federal Tax Revenues from repeated, an investment of Foreign Beach Tourists

Versus

Federal Beach Nourishment Costs

2.0

1.8

1.6

1.4

1.2

1.0

0.8

0.6

0.4

0.2

0

Foreign Beach

Tourist Federal

Tax

Revenues

($2B)

$ BILLIONS

Federal Beach

Nourishment Costs

($0.1B)

U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, 1995

Marlowe, 1999


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Federal Tax Revenues from repeated, an investment of All Beach Tourists Versus

Federal Beach Nourishment Costs

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

Beach

Tourist Federal

Tax

Revenues

($60B)

$ BILLIONS

Federal Beach

Nourishment Costs

($0.1B)

U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, 1995

Marlowe, 1999

World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001


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“There is probably no country in the world that has a greater comparative advantage in tourism than the United States.”

U.S. Travel and Tourism Administration, 1993


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The U.S. receives over 45% of the developed world’s travel and tourism revenues and 60% of its profits.

Wall Street Journal, 1994


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The U.S. ranks 31 and tourism revenues and 60% of its profits. st in tourism advertisement behind countries such as Malaysia and Tunisia, spending less than 10% of what Spain spends on advertising to international tourists.

Brooks, 1995

Washington Post, 1995

(In 1996 Congress ended this national tourism spending)


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The U.S. has slipped behind France and Spain as the leading tourist destination, and the U.S. share of the international tourism market has steadily declined in the 1990’s.

Cable News Network (CNN), 2000


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U.S. will rank a disappointing 122 in international tourism growth from 2001 to 2011, lagging countries such as Burkina Faso, Mauritius, Mali, Laos, and Botswana.

World Travel and Tourism Council, 2001


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“Without a paradigm shift in attitudes toward the economic significance of travel and tourism and necessary infrastructure investment to maintain and restore beaches, the U.S. will relinquish a dominant worldwide lead in its most important industry.”

Houston, 1995


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