Logging in Michigan

Logging in Michigan PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Most of Michigan's densely-forested land is in the western UP, where over 90% of the surface is forested . A composite map showing the relative density of forest on the landscape. Greener = more dense.. The earliest lumbering was done by the French.Built forts, fur-trading, posts and missions. The British, and later the Americans, used Michigan's hardwoods to build merchant and war ships. .

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Logging in Michigan

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1. Logging in Michigan Megha Makam

2. Most of Michigan's densely-forested land is in the western UP, where over 90% of the surface is forested

3. A composite map showing the relative density of forest on the landscape. Greener = more dense.

4. The earliest lumbering was done by the French. Built forts, fur-trading, posts and missions. The British, and later the Americans, used Michiganís hardwoods to build merchant and war ships.

5. Michiganís pine became important as the supply of trees in the northeast was used. By 1880, Michigan was producing as much lumber as the next three states combined.

6. Hardwood lumbering in the north part of the Lower Peninsula occupied the period from 1890 to 1920, and cutting of the remaining virgin hardwood stands continued in the western end of the Upper Peninsula until about 1950.

9. The lumber industry also enabled Michigan to become a leader in pulp and paper production. Changes in papermaking technology is the 1870s - away from cloth and straw and toward wood pulp - allowed of a continued demand for logs too small for lumber ("pulp" wood logs).

10. Today, Michigan is a ďreforestation successĒ.† Michigan has more forested land today than it has had in many decades.† This supply of wood enables the state to respond to times of critical need, as in World War II.† Note the graph below which shows WW II lumber production.†

11. Plantations In the 1930's and shortly thereafter, many plantations of small pine seedlings (mostly red pine) were established throughout the upper Midwest. They were planted by various government agencies as a way to retard soil erosion, which was rampant due to the many abandoned farms on the sandy soils of Michigan, and as a way to put otherwise unemployed workers back to work.

12. Many plantations are now being harvested for paper pulp or for electricity power poles. This one, a red pine plantation, is in good health because it has been thinned

13. Maple Syrup Michigan ranks sixth in the nation in maple syrup production (there are ten major producing states), with an estimated 88,000 gallons of production in 1996 and 73,000 gallons of maple syrup in 1999.† Average price received per gallon (in 1993) was $27.20, compared to $25.50 in 1992.† It takes approximately 40 gallons of sap to produce one gallon of syrup. The excess water is boiled off in order to concentrate the sugars.

14. Veneer Wood veneer extremely thin sheet of rich-coloured wood (such as mahogany, ebony, oak, or rosewood) cut in thin sheets and applied to the surface area of a piece of lower quality wood.†

16. National Forests In the 1920's and 1930's, the US Government started a "resettlement program" which provided for direct purchase of marginal agricultural land and resettled those people onto more productive lands. Most of the purchased land was set aside for National or State forests. Some land swapping occurred between state and fed, moving state forest land to national forest land, and vice versa.

18. Factoids by 1897 more than 160 billion board feet of pine had already been cut, and another six billion was still standing, mostly in the Upper Peninsula One hundred sixty-one billion board feet of pine and fifty billion board feet of cedar, hemlock, and hardwoods are the generally excepted quantities of lumber cut between 1840 and 1900. During this sixty-year period, Michigan sawmills milled roughly one billion logs.

19. If one board foot equals one square foot, one inch thick, then 211 billion board feet = 211 billion square feet, 1" thick = 7,568.5 square miles, 1" thick: ∑††† We could cover the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island with a 1" thick floor and still have over 13 billion board feet left over, ∑††† Or, we could cover Lake Ontario with a 1" thick floor and have 6.2 billion board feet left over.

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