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Biofuels and Sustainable Development: a Brazilian Perspective. Intergroup on Sustainable Development European Parliament Brussels, 27 March 2007 Marco Tulio S. Cabral. 1 – Introduction 2 – Ethanol 3 – Biodiesel 4 – Final remarks. 1 – Introduction Brazilian territory: 851 Mha

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Biofuels and Sustainable Development: a Brazilian Perspective

Intergroup on Sustainable Development

European Parliament

Brussels, 27 March 2007

Marco Tulio S. Cabral


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1 – Introduction

2 – Ethanol

3 – Biodiesel

4 – Final remarks


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  • 1 – Introduction

  • Brazilian territory: 851 Mha

  • Pasture areas: 220 Mha

  • Cultivated agricultural land: 69 Mha

  • Potential for agricultural expansion 100 Mha (excluding the Amazon, Atlantic Forest, Pantanal and other preservation areas)

  • Growth in grains production 1990-2006: 109%

  • Growth in cultivated agricultural land 1990-2006: 24%

“AmazoniaLegal”

Source: INPE


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Amazonforest

Pantanal (wetlands)

Sugar-cane plantations

  • 2 – Ethanol

  • Sugar-cane plantations: 5.7Mha - 0,67% of the Brazilian territory (50% ethanol, 50% sugar)

  • Growth in sugar-cane productivity 1977-2001: 47%

  • Water: virtually no irrigation

  • Carbon balance: 80-90%

  • Avoided emissions: 33 Mt CO2/y

  • Fuel substitution: 40% of all gasoline

  • Power generation: 3GW in near future

  • Formal direct jobs: 500.000

Atlantic Forest

ApudCOELHO, S. 2005


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  • Ethanol production 2006/07: 17.8 Mm3

  • Ethanol exports 2005: 2.6 Mm3

  • Investments for 2010: US$ 10 billion

  • Additional ethanol production : 8 Mm3

  • Additional planted area: 2 Mha

  • Expansion: mainly pasture and other agricultural areas

  • No evidence of spill-over of pasture areas to other regions

High

Medium

Low

Improper

Potential for sugar cane production without irrigation – soil, climate and topography

(protection areas excluded)


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  • 3 – Biodiesel

  • Targets: 2008 – 2% (0,8 million m³); 2013 – 5% (2,5 million m3)

  • Sources: soy (60%); castor (30%); palm;jatropha; sunflower; cotton; tallow

  • Main producers: Rio Grande do Sul, Bahia

  • Jobs: 29.000 small producers (NE)

  • Speculative scenario 2035:

  • 50 million m³, 20Mha (2,3% of territory)

Source: Ministry of Mines and Energy 2006


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  • 4 – Final remarks

  • There are no simple solutions to the challenges posed by climate change and energy security

  • In Brazil, biofuels deliver significant emission reductions and contribute to energy security with limited (sometimes positive) local impacts

  • With increased productivity, significant growth in biofuels production can be achieved with limited expansion in cultivated area


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Thank you

Marco Tulio S. Cabral

Mission of Brazil to the European Communities

E-mail: mcabral@braseuropa.be

URL: www.braseuropa.be


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