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Priority Settings for CHA (because we can’t always do what we want…). Gianfranco Pezzino Senior Fellow and Strategy Team Leader Kansas Health Institute. Prioritization.

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priority settings for cha because we can t always do what we want

Priority Settings for CHA(because we can’t always do what we want…)

Gianfranco Pezzino

Senior Fellow and Strategy Team Leader

Kansas Health Institute

prioritization
Prioritization

A process whereby an individual or group places a number of items in rank order based on their perceived or measured importance or significance

Source: APEXPH in practice

exercise
Exercise
  • Look at the list of health issues on the next slide
  • Take no more than 1 minute to rank on a piece of paper the health issues (most important first)
  • Be ready to present and justify your ranking
slide5

Obesity

Alzheimer disease

IMR

Cancer

Vaccine-preventable

disease

Unintentional injuries

Cardio-vascular disease

Foodborne disease

Mental illness

HIV infection

Oral health

report
Report
  • What are “your” priorities?
  • How did you come to this conclusion?
  • Could there be something missing?
do we have a consensus
Do we have a consensus?
  • If not, what would it take to get to a consensus?
key issues
Key Issues
  • “…an individual or group places a number of items …”
    • Each of us has values through which we judge the world
    • For group prioritization, we need to “combine” values from multiple people
  • “…based on their perceived or measured importance…”
    • Some issues have significance beyond statistics
priority settings tools
Priority Settings Tools
  • Many tools available:
    • “Qualitative”: build consensus, based primarily on perceptions and values (e.g., brainstorming, affinity diagrams, Pareto charts, etc.)
    • “Quantitative”: use data (e.g., statistics, scores, indexes, evidence of effectiveness)
  • Mixing tools is often recommended
resources all provided
Resources (all provided)
  • Handbook, page 6
  • Memory Jogger
  • NACCHO: “Tip Sheet”
  • Additional resources available upon request
model for ranking process
Model for Ranking Process
  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking
    • Decide relative significance of each criterion (weights)
  • Define list of potential issues
  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues
  • Develop an improvement plan / action plan to address the priority issues
model for ranking process1
Model for Ranking Process
  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking
how to reach consensus on criteria
How to Reach Consensus on Criteria
  • Involve the stakeholders in the process
    • Can start from a provided list of criteria or leave options open
  • This is a very important step:
    • If there is no agreement on how to judge each health issue, there can be no real consensus
    • Vision and mission statements may be helpful
commonly used criteria
Commonly Used Criteria
  • MAGNITUDE: How many people are affected?
  • SERIOUSNESS: How severe is the issue?
  • STRATEGIES: Is the problem responsive to interventions
  • FEASIBILITY: How feasible is an intervention to attack this problem?
  • CONCERN: What is the level of concern in the community?
model for ranking process2
Model for Ranking Process
  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking
  • Define list of potential issues
why compiling a list of potential issues
Why Compiling a List of Potential Issues?
  • People need to know WHAT to rank and prioritize
  • Start from your data profile:
    • If relatively few measures, that can be your list
    • If lots of measures, you need to develop shorter list
  • Several techniques can be helpful (e.g., nominal group, “dotmocracy”)
hands on activity 5 minutes
Hands-on Activity (5 minutes)
  • Refer to the handout with KHM priority indicators
  • Imagine that you have included in your CHA the 20 KHM priority health indicators
  • Spend a few minutes thinking which 10 indicators should be ranked for priority setting
  • Put a colored sticker next to the 10 selected indicators on the flip chart (in no particular order)
  • The 10 indicators with more stickers will be then prioritized
discussion
Discussion
  • What do you think of this method?
model for ranking process3
Model for Ranking Process
  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking
  • Define list of potential issues
  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues
recap
Recap
  • Now you have:
    • A list of issues to rank
    • Criteria for ranking them
  • Useful techniques:
    • Nominal Group
    • Dotmocracy
    • Multi-voting technique
    • Others (see handout from North Carolina)
are we done yet
Are We Done Yet…?
  • Review the results of the ranking process
  • Does the group members recognize themselves in that list?
  • Can everyone live with that?
  • Make adjustments as necessary
  • Process is only a tool
    • Process serves the team, not vice versa
    • Adapt process based on the group’s needs
model for ranking process4
Model for Ranking Process
  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking
  • Define list of potential issues
  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues
  • Develop an improvement plan / action plan to address the priority issues
model for ranking process5
Model for Ranking Process
  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking
  • Define list of potential issues
  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues
  • Develop an improvement plan / action plan to address the priority issues

Community Health Improvement Plan – Strategic Plan

kansas health institute
Kansas Health Institute

Information for policy makers. Health for Kansans.

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