Priority settings for cha because we can t always do what we want
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 26

Priority Settings for CHA (because we can’t always do what we want…) PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 69 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Priority Settings for CHA (because we can’t always do what we want…). Gianfranco Pezzino Senior Fellow and Strategy Team Leader Kansas Health Institute. Prioritization.

Download Presentation

Priority Settings for CHA (because we can’t always do what we want…)

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Priority settings for cha because we can t always do what we want

Priority Settings for CHA(because we can’t always do what we want…)

Gianfranco Pezzino

Senior Fellow and Strategy Team Leader

Kansas Health Institute


Prioritization

Prioritization

A process whereby an individual or group places a number of items in rank order based on their perceived or measured importance or significance

Source: APEXPH in practice


Exercise

Exercise

  • Look at the list of health issues on the next slide

  • Take no more than 1 minute to rank on a piece of paper the health issues (most important first)

  • Be ready to present and justify your ranking


Priority settings for cha because we can t always do what we want

Obesity

Alzheimer disease

IMR

Cancer

Vaccine-preventable

disease

Unintentional injuries

Cardio-vascular disease

Foodborne disease

Mental illness

HIV infection

Oral health


Report

Report

  • What are “your” priorities?

  • How did you come to this conclusion?

  • Could there be something missing?


Do we have a consensus

Do we have a consensus?

  • If not, what would it take to get to a consensus?


Key issues

Key Issues

  • “…an individual or group places a number of items …”

    • Each of us has values through which we judge the world

    • For group prioritization, we need to “combine” values from multiple people

  • “…based on their perceived or measured importance…”

    • Some issues have significance beyond statistics


Priority settings tools

Priority Settings Tools

  • Many tools available:

    • “Qualitative”: build consensus, based primarily on perceptions and values (e.g., brainstorming, affinity diagrams, Pareto charts, etc.)

    • “Quantitative”: use data (e.g., statistics, scores, indexes, evidence of effectiveness)

  • Mixing tools is often recommended


Resources all provided

Resources (all provided)

  • Handbook, page 6

  • Memory Jogger

  • NACCHO: “Tip Sheet”

  • Additional resources available upon request


Model for ranking process

Model for Ranking Process

  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking

    • Decide relative significance of each criterion (weights)

  • Define list of potential issues

  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues

  • Develop an improvement plan / action plan to address the priority issues


Model for ranking process1

Model for Ranking Process

  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking


How to reach consensus on criteria

How to Reach Consensus on Criteria

  • Involve the stakeholders in the process

    • Can start from a provided list of criteria or leave options open

  • This is a very important step:

    • If there is no agreement on how to judge each health issue, there can be no real consensus

    • Vision and mission statements may be helpful


Commonly used criteria

Commonly Used Criteria

  • MAGNITUDE: How many people are affected?

  • SERIOUSNESS: How severe is the issue?

  • STRATEGIES: Is the problem responsive to interventions

  • FEASIBILITY: How feasible is an intervention to attack this problem?

  • CONCERN: What is the level of concern in the community?


Model for ranking process2

Model for Ranking Process

  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking

  • Define list of potential issues


Why compiling a list of potential issues

Why Compiling a List of Potential Issues?

  • People need to know WHAT to rank and prioritize

  • Start from your data profile:

    • If relatively few measures, that can be your list

    • If lots of measures, you need to develop shorter list

  • Several techniques can be helpful (e.g., nominal group, “dotmocracy”)


Hands on activity 5 minutes

Hands-on Activity (5 minutes)

  • Refer to the handout with KHM priority indicators

  • Imagine that you have included in your CHA the 20 KHM priority health indicators

  • Spend a few minutes thinking which 10 indicators should be ranked for priority setting

  • Put a colored sticker next to the 10 selected indicators on the flip chart (in no particular order)

  • The 10 indicators with more stickers will be then prioritized


Discussion

Discussion

  • What do you think of this method?


Model for ranking process3

Model for Ranking Process

  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking

  • Define list of potential issues

  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues


Recap

Recap

  • Now you have:

    • A list of issues to rank

    • Criteria for ranking them

  • Useful techniques:

    • Nominal Group

    • Dotmocracy

    • Multi-voting technique

    • Others (see handout from North Carolina)


Priority setting individual scores

Priority Setting –Individual Scores


Priority setting aggregate scores

Priority Setting – Aggregate Scores


Are we done yet

Are We Done Yet…?

  • Review the results of the ranking process

  • Does the group members recognize themselves in that list?

  • Can everyone live with that?

  • Make adjustments as necessary

  • Process is only a tool

    • Process serves the team, not vice versa

    • Adapt process based on the group’s needs


Model for ranking process4

Model for Ranking Process

  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking

  • Define list of potential issues

  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues

  • Develop an improvement plan / action plan to address the priority issues


Model for ranking process5

Model for Ranking Process

  • Decide and refine criteria to use for ranking

  • Define list of potential issues

  • Use a ranking method of choice, identify 2-6 priority issues

  • Develop an improvement plan / action plan to address the priority issues

    Community Health Improvement Plan – Strategic Plan


Kansas health institute

Kansas Health Institute

Information for policy makers. Health for Kansans.


  • Login