slide1
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Quantum Many-body Dynamics in low-energy heavy-ion reactions

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 73

Quantum Many-body Dynamics in low-energy heavy-ion reactions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 171 Views
  • Uploaded on

Quantum Many-body Dynamics in low-energy heavy-ion reactions. Kouichi Hagino Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. [email protected] www.nucl.phys.tohoku.ac.jp/~hagino. Heavy-Ion Fusion Reactions around the Coulomb Barrier. Key Points:. Fusion and quantum tunneling

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Quantum Many-body Dynamics in low-energy heavy-ion reactions' - elden


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Quantum Many-body Dynamics

in low-energy heavy-ion reactions

Kouichi Hagino

Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

[email protected]

www.nucl.phys.tohoku.ac.jp/~hagino

slide2

Heavy-Ion Fusion Reactions

around the Coulomb Barrier

Key Points:

  • Fusion and quantum tunneling
  • Basics of the Coupled-channels method
  • Concept of Fusion barrier distribution
  • Quasi-elastic scattering and quantum reflection
slide3

Basic of nuclear reactions

Shape, interaction, and excitation structures of nuclei scattering expt.

cf. Experiment by Rutherford (a scatt.)

Notation

b

Target nucleus

detector

X

Y

a

measures a particle

intensity as a

function of scattering

angles

Projectile

(beam)

X(a,b)Y

208Pb(16O,16O)208Pb : 16O+208Pb elastic scattering

208Pb(16O,16O)208Pb* : 16O+208Pb inelastic scattering

208Pb(17O,16O)209Pb : 1 neutron transfer reaction

slide4

Scattering Amplitude

Motion of Free particle:

In the presence of a potential:

Asymptotic form of wave function

(scattering amplitude)

slide5

=(incident wave)

+ (scattering wave)

(flux conservation)

If only elastic scattering:

:phase shift

slide6

Differential cross section

dW

The number of scattered particle through the solid angle of dW

per unit time:

(flux for the scatt. wave)

slide7

Optical potential and Absorption cross section

Reaction processes

  • Elastic scatt.
  • Inelastic scatt.
  • Transfer reaction
  • Compound nucleus

formation (fusion)

Loss of incident flux

(absorption)

Optical potential

(note) Gauss’s law

slide8

Total incoming flux

Total outgoing flux

r

r

Net flux loss:

Absorption cross

section:

slide9

Overview of heavy-ion reactions

Heavy-ion:Nuclei heavier than4He

Two forces:

1. Coulomb force

Long range,

repulsive

2. Nuclear force

Short range,

attractive

Inter-nucleus potential

Potential barrier due

to the compensation

between the two

(Coulomb barrier)

slide10

Three important features of heavy-ion reactions

1. Coulomb interaction: important

2. Reduced mass: large(semi-) classical picture

concept of trajectory

3. Strong absorption inside the Coul. barrier

rtouch

154Sm

16O

rtouch

Automatic Compound

nucleus formation once

touched (assumption of

strong absorption)

Strong absorption

slide11

Strong absorption

Access to the region of large overlap

  • High level density (CN)
  • Huge number of d.o.f.

Relative energy is quickly lost

and converted to internal energy

:can access to the strong absorption

:cannot access cassically

Formation of hot CN (fusion reaction)

(note) In the case of

Coul. Pocket: disappears at l = lg

Reaction intermediate between

Direct reaction and fusion:

Deep Inelastic Collisions (DIC)

Scattering at relatively high energy a/o for heavy systems

slide12

Fusion reaction and Quantum Tunneling

154Sm

16O

rtouch

rtouch

Automatic CN formation

once touched (assumption

of strong absorption)

Probability of fusion

= prob. to access to rtouch

Strong absorption

Penetrability of barrier

Fusion takes place by quantum tunneling

at low energies!

slide13

V(x)

x

Quantum Tunneling Phenomena

V(x)

V0

x

-a

a

Tunnel probability:

slide14

Vb

x

For a parabolic barrier……

slide15

Energy derivative

of penetrability

(note) Classical limit

slide16

Potential Model: its success and failure

Asymptotic boundary condition:

Fusion cross section:

Mean angular mom. of CN:

rabs

Strong absorption

slide17

Wong’s formula

C.Y. Wong, Phys. Rev. Lett. 31 (’73)766

i) Approximate the Coul. barrier by a parabola:

ii) Approximate Pl by P0:

(assume l-independent Rb and

curvature)

iii) Replace the sum of l with an integral

slide18

(note)

For

(note)

slide20

Comparison between prediction of pot. model with expt. data

Fusion cross sections calculated with a static energy independent potential

16O+27Al

40Ar+144Sm

14N+12C

L.C. Vaz, J.M. Alexander, and

G.R. Satchler, Phys. Rep. 69(’81)373

  • Works well for relatively light systems
  • Underpredicts sfus for heavy systems at low energies
slide21

Potential model:

Reproduces the data

reasonably well for

E > Vb

Underpredicts sfus for

E < Vb

What is the origin?

Inter-nuclear Potential is

poorly parametrized?

Other origins?

slide22

Potential Inversion

(note)

Vb

E

r1

r2

r

slide23

A.B. Balantekin, S.E. Koonin, and

J.W. Negele, PRC28(’83)1565

slide24

Fusion cross sections calculated with a static energy independent potential

Potential model:

Reproduces the data

reasonably well for

E > Vb

Underpredicts sfus for

E < Vb

What is the origin?

Inter-nuclear Potential is

poorly parametrized?

Other origins?

slide25

Target dependence of fusion cross section

Strong target dependence at E < Vb

slide26

Low-lying collective excitations in atomic nuclei

Low-lying excited states in even-even nuclei are collective excitations,

and strongly reflect the pairing correlation and shell strucuture

Taken from R.F. Casten,

“Nuclear Structure from a

Simple Perspective”

slide27

Effect of collective excitation on sfus: rotational case

Comparison of energy scales

Tunneling motion:

3.5 MeV (barrier curvature)

Rotational motion:

The orientation angle of 154Sm does not change much during fusion

(note)

Ground state (0+ state) when

reaction starts

16O

154Sm

Mixing of all orientations

with an equal weight

slide28

16O

154Sm

The barrier is lowered for q=0 because an attraction works from large distances.

Def. Effect: enhances sfus by a factor

of 10 ~ 100

The opposite for q=p/2. The barrier

is highered as the rel. distance has

to get small for the attraction to work

Fusion: interesting probe for

nuclear structure

slide29

}

excited states

ground state

More quantal treatment: Coupled-Channels method

Coupling between rel. and

intrinsic motions

0+

Entrance

channel

0+

0+

0+

Excited

channel

2+

0+

slide30

Schroedinger equation:

or

Coupled-channels equations

slide31

0+

Entrance

channel

0+

0+

0+

Excited

channel

2+

0+

Boundary condition

slide32

Coupling Potential: Collective Model

(note) coordinate transformation

to the rotating frame ( )

  • Vibrational case
  • Rotational case

Coordinate transformation to the body-fixed rame

(for axial symmetry)

In both cases

slide34

Deformed Woods-Saxon model (collective model)

CCFULL

K.H., N. Rowley, and A.T. Kruppa,

Comp. Phys. Comm. 123(’99)143

Nuclear coupling:

Coulomb coupling:

Rotational coupling:

Vibrational coupling:

slide35

0+,2+,4+

2+

0+

Vibrational coupling

Rotational coupling

4+

2+

0+

slide36

Coupled-channels equations and barrier distribution

Calculate sfus by numerically solving the coupled-channels equations

Let us consider a limiting case in order to understand

(interpret) the numerical results

  • enI: very large
  • enI = 0

Adiabatic limit

Sudden limit

slide37

16O

154Sm

Slow intrinsic motion

Barrier Distribution

C.C. in the sudden limit

Coupled-channels:

diagonalize

slide38

w

B1

B2

B3

P0

E

B

E

B1

B2

B3

E

B

Barrier distribution

slide39

Barrier distribution: understand the concept using a spin Hamiltonian

Hamiltonian (example 1):

For Spin-up

For Spin-down

x

x

slide40

Wave function

(general form)

Asymptotic form at

(the C1 and C2 are fixed

according to the spin state

of the system)

(flux at )

Tunnel probability =

(incoming flux at )

slide42

Tunnel prob. is enhanced at E < Vb and hindered E > Vb

  • dP/dEsplits to two peaks     “barrier distribution”
  • The peak positions of dP/dE correspond to each barrier height
  • The height of each peak is proportional to the weight factor
slide43

Hamiltonian (example 2): in case with off-diagonal components

If spin-up at the beginning of the reaction

slide44

Hamiltonian (example 3): more general cases

x dependent

E dependent

K.H., N. Takigawa, A.B. Balantekin, PRC56(’97)2104

(note) Adiabatic limit:

slide45

Sub-barrier Fusion and Barrier distribution method

  • Fusion takes place by quantum tunneling at low energies
  • C.C. effect can be understood in terms of distribution of many barriers
  • sfus is given as an average over the many distributed barriers

Tunneling of a spin system

The way how the barrier is

distributed can be clearly seen

by taking the energy derivative

of penetrability

Can one not do a similar thing with fusion cross sections?

slide46

One important fact: experimental observable is not penetrability, but

fusion cross section

(Fusion barrier distribution)

N. Rowley, G.R. Satchler,

P.H. Stelson, PLB254(’91)25

(note)Classical fusion cross section

slide47

Fusion Test Function

Classical fusion cross section:

Tunneling effect

smears the delta function

  • Fusion test function:
  • Symmetric around E=Vb
  • Centered on E=Vb
  • Its integral over E is
  • Has a relatively narrow width
slide48

Barrier distribution measurements

Fusion barrier distribution

Needs high precision data in order for the 2nd derivative to be meaningful

(early 90’s)

slide49

Experimental Barrier Distribution

16O

154Sm

Requires high precision data

M. Dasgupta et al.,

Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 48(’98)401

slide51

By taking the barrier distribution, one can very clearly see

the difference due to b4!

Fusion as a quantum tunneling microscope for nuclei

slide52

Advantage of fusion barrierdistribution

Fusion Cross sections

Very strong exponential energy

dependence

Difficult to see differences due

to details of nuclear structure

Plot cross sections in a different way: Fusion barrier distribution

N. Rowley, G.R. Satchler,

P.H. Stelson, PLB254(’91)25

Function which is sensitive to details of nuclear structure

slide53

Example for spherical vibrational system

16O + 144Sm

Anharmonicity of octupole

vibration

1.8

3-

0+

144Sm

Quadrupole moment:

K.Hagino, N. Takigawa, and S. Kuyucak,

PRL79(’97)2943

slide54

Vb

x

Quantum reflection and quasi-elastic scattering

In quantum mechanics, reflection occurs even at E > Vb

Quantum Reflection

Reflection prob. carries the same information as penetrability, and

barrier distribution can be defined in terms of reflection prob.

slide55

16O

154Sm

Quasi-Elastic Scattering

Fusion

A sum of all the reaction processes

other than fusion (elastic + inelastic

+ transfer + ……)

Quasi-elastic

Detect all the particles which

reflect at the barrier and hit the

detector

Related to reflection

In case of a def. target……

Complementary to fusion

slide56

16O

154Sm

Quasi-elastic barrier distribution

Quasi-elastic barrier distribution:

H. Timmers et al.,

NPA584(’95)190

(note)

Classical elastic cross section in the limit of strong Coulomb field:

slide57

Nuclear effects Semi-classical perturbation theory

Quasi-elastic Test Function

Classical elastic cross section (in the limit of a strong Coulomb):

S. Landowne and H.H. Wolter, NPA351(’81)171

K.H. and N. Rowley, PRC69(’04)054610

slide58

The peak position slightly deviates

from Vb

  • Low energy tail
  • Integral over E: unity
  • Relatively narrow width

Close analog to fusion b.d.

Quasi-elastic test function

slide59

K.H. and N. Rowley, PRC69(’04)054610

Fusion

Quasi-elastic

Comparison of Dfus with Dqel

H. Timmers et al., NPA584(’95)190

A gross feature is similar to each other

slide60

Suitable for low intensity exotic beams

Experimental advantages for Dqel

・ less accuracy is required in the data (1st vs. 2nd derivative)

・ much easier to be measured

Qel:a sum of everything

a very simple charged-particle detector

Fusion: requires a specializedrecoil separator

to separate ER from the incident beam

ER + fission for heavy systems

・several effective energies can be measured at a single-beam

energy relation between a scattering angle and an impact

parameter

measurements with a cyclotron accelerator: possible

Qel: will open up a possibility to study the structure of unstable nuclei

slide61

Scaling property of Dqel

16O + 144Sm

Expt.: impossible to perform

at q = p

Relation among different q?

Effective energy:

slide63

Fusion

Quasi-elastic

Future experiments with radioactive beams

Fusion barrier distribution: requires high precision measurements for sfus

Radioactive beams:much lower beam intensity

than beams of stable nuclei

Unlikely for high precision data at this moment

Possible to extract barrier distribution in other ways?

Exploit reflection prob.

instead of penetrability

P + R = 1

Quasi-elastic scattering

slide64

32Mg: breaking of the N=20 shell?

Expt. at RIKEN and GANIL:

large B(E2) and small E2+

deformation?

MF calculationsspherical?

Dqel measurements with radioactive beams

Low intensity radioactive beams:

High precision fusion measurements

still difficult

Quasi-elastic measurements

may be possible

(0+,2+,4+)

(0+,3-)

Example: 32Mg + 208Pb

E4+/E2+ = 2.62

Investigation of collective

excitations unique to n-rich nuclei

K.H. and N. Rowley, PRC69(’04)054610

slide65

Expt. at RIKEN:

E2+ = 1.766 MeV

B(E2) = 0.26 0.05W.u.

Mn/Mp=7.6 1.7

16C

Recent expt: very small B(E2)

16C

  • Different (static) deformation

between n and p?

  • Neutron excitation of
  • spherical nuclei?

16C

N. Imai et al., PRL92(’04)062501

slide66

Does break-up hinder/enhance

fusion cross sections?

Reference cross sections

How to choose reference cross sections?

Fusion enhancement/hindrance compared to what?

i) Comparison to tightly-bound systems

11Be + 209Bi 10Be + 209Bi

6He + 238U 4He + 238U

Separation between static and dynamical

effects?

R. Raabe et al.

Nature(’04)

ii) Measurement of average fusion barrier

Fusion barrier distribution

9Be + 208Pb

6,7Li + 209Bi

M. Dasgupta et al.

PRL82(’99)1395

Neutron-rich nuclei

Dqel(E)

slide67

VC.b.

Surface diffuseness problem

VN(r) = -V0/[1+exp((r-R0)/a)]

Scattering processes: a ~ 0.63 fm

Fusion: a = 0.75 ~ 1.5 fm

C.L. Jiang et al., PRL93(’04)012701

slide68

QEL at deep subbarrier

energies: sensitive only

to the surface region

Quasi-elastic scattering at deep subbarrier energies?

K.H., T. Takehi, A.B. Balantekin,

and N. Takigawa, PRC71(’05) 044612

K. Washiyama, K.H., M. Dasgupta,

PRC73(’06) 034607

16O + 154Sm

slide70

Application to SHE

Synthesis of superheavy elements: extremely small cross sections

Important to choose the optimum incident energy

Absence of the barrier height systematics

Determine the fusion barrier height for SHE using Dqel

Future plan at JAERI

Cold fusion reactions: 50Ti,54Cr,58Fe,64Ni,70Zn+208Pb,209Bi

slide71

Preliminary data

S. Mitsuoka, H. Ikezoe, K. Nishio, K. Tsuruta,

S.C. Heong, Y.X. Watanabe (’05)

comparison
Comparison

GSI

VBass

RIKEN

GSI

RIKEN

GSI

RIKEN

GSI

RIKEN

Present data

Evaporation residue cross section by GSI and RIKEN

slide73

References

Nuclear Reaction in general

  • G.R. Satchler, “Direct Nuclear Reactions”
  • G.R. Satchler, “Introduction to Nuclear Reaction”
  • R.A. Broglia and A. Winther, “Heavy-Ion Reactions”
  • “Treatise on Heavy-Ion Science”, vol. 1-7
  • D.M. Brink, “Semi-classical method in nucleus-nucleus collisions”
  • P. Frobrich and R. Lipperheide, “Theory of Nuclear Reactions”

Heavy-ion Fusion Reactions

  • M. Dasgupta et al., Annu. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci. 48(’98) 401
  • A.B. Balantekin and N. Takigawa, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70(’98) 77
  • Proc. of Fusion03, Prog. Theo. Phys. Suppl. 154(’04)
  • Proc. of Fusion97, J. of Phys. G 23 (’97)
  • Proc. of Fusion06, AIP, in press.
ad