WORKPLACE Health Promotion

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WORKPLACE Health Promotion

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1. WORKPLACE Health Promotion …is good business Karen Armstrong, M.A., DPH Workplace Wellness Consultant

2. What is Workplace Health Promotion? A voluntary process which businesses can use to assist in meeting: Business goals Legislative requirements Human resource responsibilities Internal /external communication processes. Source: Wilkerson, 2000

3. Workplace Health Promotion Provides a problem-solving framework. Identifies problems and concerns affecting employer and employee health through an on-line survey. Identifies individual and organizational issues affecting workplace efficiency. Identifies key strengths of the organization.

4. Workplace Health Promotion Assists in developing strategies to address any problems and concerns for the organization AND the employee. Complements and supports existing workplace practices.

5. Effective Workplace Health Promotion will Improve: Source: Wilkerson, 2000 The workplace is more than just a location in which to “do health promotion”. Work and the workplace influence in direct and pervasive ways the behaviours and risk factors that Public Health is trying to change. Understanding the workplace as a determinant of health provides Public Health with significant opportunities to enhance its impact on the health of this population (Eakin, 1999). The workplace is more than just a location in which to “do health promotion”. Work and the workplace influence in direct and pervasive ways the behaviours and risk factors that Public Health is trying to change. Understanding the workplace as a determinant of health provides Public Health with significant opportunities to enhance its impact on the health of this population (Eakin, 1999).

6. Work/Life Balance Job Satisfaction Coworker Support Managerial Support Organizational Support Sense of Control

7. Investing in Workplace Health Promotion 13 million Canadians spend about half of their waking hours at work.

8. Investing in Workplace Health Promotion Over 50% of the workforce has little or no access to workplace health promotion. Source: Health Canada’s Workplace Health System Program

9. Investing in Workplace Health Promotion 86% of employees are somewhat or very concerned with their physical work environment. Just over 50% report concern with job demands. Source: Health Canada, 1998

10. Investing in Workplace Health Promotion One in two adults in Canada report being stressed on a frequent basis. This can contribute to circulatory system problems including heart attacks. Source: Heart and Stroke Foundation Annual Report Card on Canadian’s Health

11. Investing in Workplace Health Promotion Unhealthy lifestyle habits are used for coping with increased stress. Resort to: Watching more television Eating more comfort foods Smoking cigarettes Consuming alcohol. Source: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

12. Benefits of Workplace Health Promotion Financial benefits + Improved employee health = Increased productivity & job satisfaction!

13. Financial Benefits Reduced rates of: Absenteeism Injuries Staff turnover Workers’ Compensation claims Extended health care costs. List handout B CHECK THIS!!!List handout B CHECK THIS!!!

14. Financial Benefits A program must be sustained for a minimum of 3-5 years to demonstrate cost-effectiveness. Source: Pelletier, 1997

15. Health-Related Benefits Changes in knowledge and health risk behaviours for the duration of the program: Fitness levels Eating habits Stress Alcohol. Source: Craig Evans, 1999 In a 1997 review of 365 studies, O’Donnell cited by Craig-Evans (1999) concludes that many health promotion programs have been able produce changes in knowledge and health risk behaviours for the duration of the program. List of behaviours In a 1997 review of 365 studies, O’Donnell cited by Craig-Evans (1999) concludes that many health promotion programs have been able produce changes in knowledge and health risk behaviours for the duration of the program. List of behaviours

16. Health-Related Benefits A program must be sustained for a minimum of one year to bring about risk reductions among employees. Source: Pelletier, 1997

17. Successful Worksite Programs Successful programs are comprehensive. “Comprehensive” means: Planned with organizational participation Addresses individual worker health Addresses the broader environment Includes monitoring, feedback and reinforcement. Source: Craig-Evans, 1999

18. Elements of Success Employee ownership in the development and program goal-setting is the top priority. The program acknowledges and supports workplace health and safety. Strong program leadership models healthy behaviours. = Increase program credibility and participation.

19. Elements of Success Smaller workplaces tend to have: Higher participation rates than larger workplaces. Positive results from their programs. Employees who work in rural areas, in the private sector, and in smaller workplaces are less likely report that their workplace has healthy workplace practices. Examples: restrictive smoking policies, healthy catering practices, sun protection practices, disability access features, and/or workplace health promotion programs (Hollman et al., 1998) Then go over the two bulleted points. Employees who work in rural areas, in the private sector, and in smaller workplaces are less likely report that their workplace has healthy workplace practices. Examples: restrictive smoking policies, healthy catering practices, sun protection practices, disability access features, and/or workplace health promotion programs (Hollman et al., 1998) Then go over the two bulleted points.

20. 9 Steps of the Comprehensive Workplace Model STEP 1: Establish commitment between the workplace and the Community Heart Health Network. Process – How are we going to do it? Definitions – Ie. Health Resources – Who provides what? Follow through – By whom? Employee interests and needs. The comprehensive workplace model that the Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Health Unit proposes to apply is adapted from the Corporate Health Model and includes the following steps: (see slide) Commitment to the Health Plan: Present business case using current research and link to bottom-line results (can be productivity, reduced health costs, job satisfaction, etc. --note in indicators) Review concepts: benefits, keys to success, planning schedule, indicators of success. Determine exactly what management wants out of the program. The comprehensive workplace model that the Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Health Unit proposes to apply is adapted from the Corporate Health Model and includes the following steps: (see slide) Commitment to the Health Plan: Present business case using current research and link to bottom-line results (can be productivity, reduced health costs, job satisfaction, etc. --note in indicators) Review concepts: benefits, keys to success, planning schedule, indicators of success. Determine exactly what management wants out of the program.

21. Comprehensive Workplace Model STEP 2: Conduct a social marketing campaign. Key Messages: Meaningful results for the organization AND the individual. Confidentiality issues addressed. Announcement of implementation of workplace health to staff. Follow with brochure. Build in incentives and rewards to keep employees involved. Do subtle sales job with staff defining real needs and what’s in it for them. Public relations staff should be involved in the process. Announcement of implementation of workplace health to staff. Follow with brochure. Build in incentives and rewards to keep employees involved. Do subtle sales job with staff defining real needs and what’s in it for them. Public relations staff should be involved in the process.

22. Comprehensive Workplace Model STEP 3: Establish a workplace committee. Senior management Union Staff Health & Safety Champion. A sound approach achieved through commitment and support of senior management to reinforce and allow changes necessary for improvement. CommitteeA sound approach achieved through commitment and support of senior management to reinforce and allow changes necessary for improvement. Committee

23. Comprehensive Workplace Model STEP 4: Conduct a needs assessment. Recruitment & Retention Co-worker, manager and organizational support Job Satisfaction Mission, vision and value statements Smoking Physical Activity Nutrition Stress. Needs Assessment—Health Risk Appraisal (HRA) A formal assessment conducted to evaluate employee needs, attitudes and preferences in regard to healthy workplace programs. A procedure for comparing broad-based epidemiological data with personal info to project one’s risk of dying. Computer-scored, results based on a self-administered health and lifestyle questionnaire. Benefits: Easy-to-use Popular with employees When used annually serves as a tool to reduce aggregate group health risks Needs Assessment—Health Risk Appraisal (HRA) A formal assessment conducted to evaluate employee needs, attitudes and preferences in regard to healthy workplace programs. A procedure for comparing broad-based epidemiological data with personal info to project one’s risk of dying. Computer-scored, results based on a self-administered health and lifestyle questionnaire. Benefits: Easy-to-use Popular with employees When used annually serves as a tool to reduce aggregate group health risks

24. Comprehensive Workplace Model STEP 5: Present individual AND corporate health profiles. 3-5 % of employees will make a change based on receiving individualized feedback! Community supports available Research and benchmarks provided. Individual profiles released: Makes recommendations for reducing health risks for the purpose of promoting desirable changes in lifestyle behaviours. Know individual profiles increase motivation to make positive behaviour changes. Corporate profile Highlights top 10 areas for improvement. Present to senior management.Individual profiles released: Makes recommendations for reducing health risks for the purpose of promoting desirable changes in lifestyle behaviours. Know individual profiles increase motivation to make positive behaviour changes. Corporate profile Highlights top 10 areas for improvement. Present to senior management.

25. Comprehensive Workplace Model STEP 6: Develop a corporate action/health plan. Incorporate action steps into the strategic plan Policies and procedures – develop/awareness Programs and activities. STEP 7: Implement the plan. Step 6: Corporate health plan developed: Developed by workplace health committee. Based on results of employee needs assessment. Financial resources planned and committed. Short-term and long-term objectives surrounding employee well-being established within plan, communicated and discussed across the organization. Step 7: Program action plan implemented Methods in place for people to provide on-going input into corporate health plan. Aligns with with human resources development strategies. Barriers that restrict development and reinforcement of healthy workplace identified and removed. Employees encouraged to participate in workplace health matters.Step 6: Corporate health plan developed: Developed by workplace health committee. Based on results of employee needs assessment. Financial resources planned and committed. Short-term and long-term objectives surrounding employee well-being established within plan, communicated and discussed across the organization. Step 7: Program action plan implemented Methods in place for people to provide on-going input into corporate health plan. Aligns with with human resources development strategies. Barriers that restrict development and reinforcement of healthy workplace identified and removed. Employees encouraged to participate in workplace health matters.

26. Develop A Corporate Health Plan STEP 8: Review of progress — Communication – This is key! Always tie your action steps to the survey Review of Progress Process in place to measure employee satisfaction and morale. Process in place to recognize employee achievements. Distribution of annual health report to communicate progress on personal (if applicable) and organizational goals. Part of evaluation/social marketing/communication plan. Review of Progress Process in place to measure employee satisfaction and morale. Process in place to recognize employee achievements. Distribution of annual health report to communicate progress on personal (if applicable) and organizational goals. Part of evaluation/social marketing/communication plan.

27. Comprehensive Workplace Model STEP 9: On-going evaluation 50 Hours of Consultant’s time to assist where organization feels it is best utilized – e.g., setup, evaluation, implementation strategies. Phone assistance available. Evaluation Assess workplace plan Determine strengths and opportunities for improvement Management (through actions) personally reinforce healthy workplace plan across the organization Data and trends analyzed re: employee participation, behaviour change, employee satisfaction, absenteeism, employee turnover, accident rates, implementation of employee suggestions and ideas, utilization of health programs, health behaviour change, policy changes, awareness, skill development.Evaluation Assess workplace plan Determine strengths and opportunities for improvement Management (through actions) personally reinforce healthy workplace plan across the organization Data and trends analyzed re: employee participation, behaviour change, employee satisfaction, absenteeism, employee turnover, accident rates, implementation of employee suggestions and ideas, utilization of health programs, health behaviour change, policy changes, awareness, skill development.

28. Partners Active Living Guelph Canadian Cancer Society Centre For Families, Work and Well-Being Ontario Early Years Centre – Dufferin County Headwaters Health Care Centre Evergreen Seniors Centre Everdale Environmental Learning Centre Groves Memorial Community Hospital

30. References Beyers, J. (1999). Creating Healthy Workplaces…Issues and Implications for Heart Health Partners. Craig-Evans, D. (1999). Workplace Health Promotion Programs: A Review of “Why, How and What”. Regional Municipality of Haldimand-Norfolk Health Department, Simcoe, Ontario. Eakin, J. (1999). Public Health and Workplace Health Promotion. PHERO. 10(5):79-89. Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Press Release, February 2, 2000. Hollman, C. et al. (1998). Association of the health promoting workplace with trade unionism and other industrial factors. American Journal of Health Promotion. 12(5), 325-334.

31. References (continued) Influencing Employee Health. Workplace Health System, Health Canada. Number 1, 1998. Lee, K. et al. (2000) Creating health workplaces II…Towards a comprehensive cardiovascular disease prevention strategy in workplace health: A strategy that addresses the work factors associated with cardiovascular disease. The Institute for Work & Health, and the Public Health Research, Education and Development (PHRED) programs of the Region of Hamilton-Wentworth Social & Public Health Services and the Sudbury & District Health Unit. National Quality Institute (1998) Canadian Healthy Workplace Criteria. Pelletier, K.R. (1996) A review and analysis of the health and cost-effectiveness outcome studies of comprehensive health promotion and disease prevention programs at the worksite: 1993-1995 update. American Journal of Health Promotion 10:380-388.

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