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School of Engineering and Electronics & Bovis Lend Lease. Infrastructure Management and Sustainability and Management, Sustainability and Fluid Mechanics Health & Safety Management Simon Smith & Philip Matyear. Welcome…. This H&S Module is a recent initiative…

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School of engineering and electronics bovis lend lease l.jpg

School of Engineering and Electronics& Bovis Lend Lease

Infrastructure Management and Sustainability

and

Management, Sustainability and Fluid Mechanics

Health & Safety Management

Simon Smith & Philip Matyear


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Welcome…

  • This H&S Module is a recent initiative…

  • It is relatively unique amongst UK Civil Engineering Degree Programmes

  • It introduces H&S

    • from an academic viewpoint

    • and as preparation for working in the industry

  • Most importantly, it is delivered together with Bovis Lend Lease

    • who can bring real & current issues

  • Therefore I’m delighted to introduce Phillip Matyear

    • Bovis Lend Lease’s Environmental Health & Safety Strategy Manager for the UK


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Why?

  • You should be prepared:


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Some Statistics...

  • Health & Safety is full of them

  • They help set the scene:

    • In the UK since 1980 there have been over 2800 who have died from injuries they received as a result of construction work (HSE)

    • In Europe, construction accounts for 30% of all workplace fatalities, whilst employing only 10% of the workforce

    • In 2000 the construction fatal accident rate for the UK was quoted as 5.9 per 100,000 employees

      • For the same year the EU figure was 11.4. [Latest figure is much improved: in 2005/06 the fatal accident rate for UK construction is 2.95].

    • In the US, construction accounts for 20% of workplace fatalities, whilst accounting for only 5% of the labour force

    • Workers in the UK construction industry represent just over 6% of the working population, but account for more than 30% of the fatal accidents and over 14% of the major accidents;


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Some Statistics...

  • Workers in the construction industry are almost seven times more likely to be killed than the average for all industries;

  • They are more than twice as likely to sustain a major injury than the average for all industries;

  • Almost a quarter of all inspections carried out by HSE are of construction activities;

  • The overall risk of ill health in construction is nearly twice the average for all occupations;

  • It is estimated that about 1 in 20 workers, currently or recently working in construction, have suffered a work-related musculo-skeletal disorder;

  • There are about 600 deaths annually from asbestos-related disease among workers in construction trades


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UK Construction Fatalities


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UK Construction Fatalities


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UK Construction Fatalities


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Comparison with other industries

Current Figure < 4

(HSE no longer publishes this chart)


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Comparison with other countries

  • All workplace fatalities (2000):


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Europe Only:

From HSE Safety

Statistics, 2004


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Comparison with other countries

  • All workplace fatalities (2003):

1.1


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Revitalising Health & Safety

  • As a reaction to poor overall statistics, John Prescott launched Revitalising Health & Safety in March 1999

  • This set targets for all industries and had a 10 point strategy plan. Point no 9:

    • “Most health and safety failures are due to poor management and ignorance of good practice, rather than direct malicious intent. Educationat every level, starting in primary school, in health and safety skills and risk management is key. Significant steps forward have been made, but there is much more still to do. Coverage of risk issues in engineering, design and general management education remains weak.”


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RHS National Targets

  • to reduce the number of working days lost per 100,000 workers from work-related injury and ill health by 30% by 2010;

  • to reduce the incidence rate of fatal and major injury accidents by 10% by 2010;

  • to reduce the incidence rate of cases of work-related ill health by 20% by 2010;

  • achieve half the improvement under each target by 2004.


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RHS in Construction

  • Construction has responded better than most

  • The ‘Safety Summit’ in February 2001 challenged the Construction Industry to improve its own situation

    • ‘Turning Concern Into Action’

  • It had already set up its own organisation to achieve this: Working Well Together

    • www.wwt.uk.com


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RHS Construction Targets – all Reduction

  • Fatalities and major injuries by 40% by 2004/05 and by 66% by 2009/10

  • Cases of work-related ill-health by 20% by 2004/05 and by 50% by 2009/10

  • Number of working days lost per 100,000 workers from work-related ill health by 20% by 2004/05 and 50% by 2009/10


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Improvements

  • The construction industry’s reaction so far in the 21st century has been very positive

  • Fatalities have dropped

  • Safety Cultures are evident on many sites:


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RHS Progress? Incident Rate Changes against Targets

Source: http://www.hse.gov.uk/revitalising/casestudyconstruction.pdf


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New Safety Summit – 25 Feb 2005

  • Trying to maintain impetus. Intro to summit by Kevin Myers:

    • Video (3.5mins)

  • Realised that targets will only be met via Commitments

  • Commitments so far:

27%

46%

Source: www.hse.gov.uk/construction/summit/commitment.htm


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Sustained improvement?

  • It is fair to say that safety has had a very high profile in the last four years and this has probably contributed to improved statistics

  • Can this be sustained?

  • Most of the targets, information and resources focus, rightly so, on the practices of the construction industry itself – trades and tasks, management and planning.

  • What is also needed and alluded to in Revitalising Health & Safety is a strategy for health and safety education


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Identification and management of risk in undergraduate construction courses

  • Therefore a study was carried out:

  • To determine the current provision of health and safety teaching within undergraduate construction courses,

  • The report provided recommendations for the improved provision of H&S in such courses. In particular:

    • Health and safety risk management is not yet widely recognised as an intellectual subject with a central role in construction risk management.


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Identification and management of risk in undergraduate construction courses

  • Health and safety risk issues are generally not well integrated into the curriculum and undergraduates are not adequately assessed in this particular area of study.

  • The management and provision of professional development opportunities for teaching staff in health and safety risk management topics is at best poor and generally non-existent.


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Identification and management of risk in undergraduate construction courses

  • General recommendations were that academia should (amongst other points):

    • Embrace health and safety risk management as an integral and intellectual component part of the curriculum

    • Actively promote the concept of a ‘health and safety champion’ within their staff complement who will initiate and lead the integration of health and safety risk management within all construction courses.

    • Work to maximise the links with industry in order to develop intellectual exchange and learning opportunities for staff , students and practitioners alike


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