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2006 NSSE. National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Understanding SRU Student Engagement Patterns of Evidence. Overview. What is student engagement? What do we already know about student engagement? Why is student engagement important? What is the NSSE?

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2006 NSSE

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

Understanding SRU Student Engagement

Patterns of Evidence


Overview
Overview

  • What is student engagement?

  • What do we already know about student engagement?

  • Why is student engagement important?

  • What is the NSSE?

    • National Survey of Student Engagement

  • What are some highlights from SRU’s NSSE results?

  • How can we use the NSSE results to improve our institutional efforts to improve student learning and engagement?


What is student engagement
What is Student Engagement?

  • Represents several important aspects of collegiate quality:

    • Academic Engagement

      • The amount of time and effort students put into their studies and other meaningful academic activities

      • How the institution deploys resources and organizes its curriculum and other learning opportunities

    • Social and Personal Engagement

      • The amount of time and effort students involve themselves in social activities (clubs, organizations, honoraries, athletics, recreation, fraternities/sororities, community service, etc.)

        Correlates with student learning and retention


What really matters in college student engagement
What Really Matters in College: Student Engagement

“The research is unequivocal: students who are actively involved in both academic and out-of-class activities gain more from the college experience than those who are not so involved.”

Pascarella & Terenzini. (2005). How college affects students: A third decade of research. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers, 2005


What is nsse pronounced nessie
What is NSSE?(pronounced “nessie”)

  • The survey assesses the extent to which first-year and senior students engage in educational practices associated with high levels of learning and development

  • Supported by grants from Lumina Foundation for Education and the Center of Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College

  • Co-sponsored by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Pew Forum on Undergraduate Learning


Why a national survey
Why a National Survey?

  • Refocuses conversations about undergraduate quality to what matters most

  • Assesses students’ engagement in educational practices associated with high levels of learning and personal development

  • Enhances institutional improvement efforts

  • Fosters comparative & consortium activity

  • Informs accountability

  • Provides systematic national data on “good educational practices”


Effective educational practices
Effective Educational Practices

  • Student-faculty contact

  • Active learning

  • Prompt feedback

  • Time on task

  • High expectations

  • Cooperation among students

  • Respect for diverse talents and ways of learning

“Seven principles of good practice in undergraduate education” (Chickering and Gamson, 1987)

Chickering and Gamson. (1987). Seven principles of good practice in undergraduate education.


Nsse project scope
NSSE Project Scope

  • More than 1,100 different colleges/universities

  • 50 states, Puerto Rico, & Canada

  • Data from more than 1,225,000 students

  • Institutions include Historically Black College and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Tribal Colleges, and all female and all male colleges


Use and validity of self reports
Use and Validity of Self-Reports

  • Requested information is known to respondents

  • Questions phrased clearly & unambiguously

  • Respondents take questions seriously and thoughtfully

  • Answering does not threaten, embarrass, or violate privacy or compel a socially desirable response

National assessment expertsdesigned

the NSSE survey, The College Student Report,

to meet all these conditions


What does the college student report cover
What Does The College Student Report Cover?

Student Behaviors in College

Student Learning

& Development

Institutional Actions

And Requirements

Student Reactions to College

Student Background

Information


Survey administration
Survey Administration

  • Administered to random sample of first-year & senior students

  • Paper & Web-based survey

  • Flexible to accommodate consortium questions

  • Multiple follow-ups to increase response rates



How well does sru engage students looking for patterns of evidence
How Well Does SRU Engage Students? Looking for Patterns of Evidence…

A sampling of results from the National Survey of Student Engagement (2005) which show that our students are engaged in their undergraduate experience as compared to selected peer and Carnegie peer institutions. The descriptive listing of indicators provided below signify mean responses that were equal to or greater than our peer institutions and our Carnegie classification institutions.

Academic and Intellectual Experiences

  • Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions (FR & SR)

  • Made a class presentation (FR & SR)

  • Worked on a paper or project that required integrating ideas or information from various sources (SR)

  • Included diverse perspectives (different races, religions, genders, political beliefs, etc.) in class discussions or writing assignments (FR & SR)

  • Worked with other students on projects during class (FR & SR)

  • "Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments“ (FR & SR)

  • Put together ideas or concepts from different courses when completing assignments or during class discussions (FR & SR)

  • "Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary)“ (SR)

  • Participated in a community-based project (e.g. service learning) as part of a regular course (FR & SR)

  • Used an electronic medium (listserv, chat group, Internet, instant messaging, etc.) to discuss or complete an assignment (FR & SR)

  • Used e-mail to communicate with an instructor (FR & SR)

  • Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor (SR)

  • "Talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor“ (FR & SR)

  • "Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class“ (FR & SR)

  • Received prompt written or oral feedback from faculty on your academic performance (FR & SR)

  • Worked harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor's standards or expectations (FR & SR)

  • Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student life activities, etc.) (FR & SR)

  • Had serious conversations with students who are very different from you in terms of their religious beliefs, political opinions, or personal values (FR & SR)

National Survey of Student Engagement, SRU, 2006


How well does sru engage students looking for patterns of evidence1
How Well Does SRU Engage Students? Looking for Patterns of Evidence…

A sampling of results from the National Survey of Student Engagement (2005) which show that our students are engaged in their undergraduate experience as compared to selected peer and Carnegie peer institutions. The descriptive listing of indicators provided below signify mean responses that were equal to or greater than our peer institutions and our Carnegie classification institutions.

Mental Activities

  • Memorizing facts, ideas, or methods from your courses and readings so you can repeat them in pretty much the same form (FR & SR)

  • Analyzing the basic elements of an idea, experience, or theory, such as examining a particular case or situation in depth and considering its components (SR)

  • Synthesizing and organizing ideas, information, or experiences into new, more complex interpretations and relationships (FR & SR)

  • Making judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods, such as examining how others gathered and interpreted data and assessing the soundness of their conclusions (SR)

  • Applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations (SR)

    Reading and Writing

  • "Number of assigned textbooks, books, or book-length packs of course readings" (FR)

  • Number of books read on your own (not assigned) for personal enjoyment or academic enrichment (SR)

  • Number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more (FR)

  • Number of written papers or reports between 5 and 19 pages (FR & SR)

  • Number of written papers or reports of fewer than 5 pages (FR & SR)

    Problem Sets

  • Number of problem sets that take you less than an hour to complete (FR & SR)

    Examinations

  • To what extent have your examinations during the current school year challenged you to do your best work? (FR)

    Additional Collegiate Experiences

  • Attended an art exhibit, gallery, play, dance, or other theatre performance (FR)

  • Exercised or participated in physical fitness activities (FR & SR)

  • Learned something that changed the way you understand an issue or concept (SR)

National Survey of Student Engagement, SRU, 2006


Looking for patterns of evidence
Looking for Patterns of Evidence… Patterns of Evidence…

A sampling of results from the National Survey of Student Engagement (2005) which show that our students are engaged in their undergraduate experience as compared to selected peer and Carnegie peer institutions. The descriptive listing of indicators provided below signify mean responses that were equal to or greater than our peer institutions and our Carnegie classification institutions.

Enriching Educational Experiences

  • Practicum, internship, field experience, co-op experience, or clinical assignment (FR & SR)

  • Community service or volunteer work (FR & SR)

  • Participate in a learning community or some other formal program where groups of students take two or more classes together (FR & SR)

  • Work on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements (SR)

  • Study abroad (FR)

  • Independent or self-designed major (FR)

  • Culminating senior experience (capstone course, senior project or thesis, comprehensive exam, etc.) (FR)

    Quality of Relationships

  • Relationships with other students (FR & SR)

  • Relationships with faculty members (SR)

  • Relationships with administrative personnel and offices (SR)

    Time Usage

  • Preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, doing homework or lab work, analyzing data, rehearsing, and other academic activities) (FR & SR)

  • Working for pay on campus (FR & SR)

  • Participating in co-curricular activities (organizations, campus publications, student government, fraternity or sorority, intercollegiate or intramural sports, etc.) (FR & SR)

  • "Relaxing and socializing (watching TV, partying, etc.)“ (FR)

  • Commuting to class (driving, walking, etc.) (SR)

National Survey of Student Engagement, SRU, 2006


Looking for patterns of evidence1

Educational and Personal Growth Patterns of Evidence…

Acquiring a broad general education (FR)

"Acquiring job or work-related knowledge and skills“ (FR & SR)

Writing clearly and effectively (FR & SR)

Speaking clearly and effectively (FR & SR)

Thinking critically and analytically (SR)

Analyzing quantitative problems (FR)

Using computing and information technology (SR)

Working effectively with others (FR & SR)

Voting in local, state, or national elections (FR & SR)

Learning effectively on your own (FR & SR)

Understanding yourself (SR)

Understanding people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds (FR & SR)

Solving complex real-world problems (FR & SR)

Developing a personal code of values and ethics (SR)

Contributing to the welfare of your community (FR & SR)

Developing a deepened sense of spirituality (SR)

Institutional Environment

Spending significant amounts of time studying and on academic work (SR)

Providing the support you need to help you succeed academically (SR)

Encouraging contact among students from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds (FR & SR)

Helping you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.) (FR & SR)

Providing the support you need to thrive socially (FR & SR)

"Attending campus events and activities (special speakers, cultural performances, athletic events, etc.)“(FR & SR)

Using computers in academic work (FR & SR)

Academic Advising

Quality of academic advising you have received at your institution (SR)

Satisfaction

Evaluation of entire educational experience at this institution (FR)

Looking for Patterns of Evidence….

A sampling of results from the National Survey of Student Engagement (2005) show that our students are engaged in their undergraduate experience as compared to selected peer and Carnegie peer institutions. The descriptive listing of indicators provided below signify mean responses that were equal to or greater than our peer institutions.

National Survey of Student Engagement, SRU, 2006


Looking for patterns of evidence areas of improvement or focus
Looking for Patterns of Evidence…Areas of Improvement or Focus ???

A sampling of results from the National Survey of Student Engagement (2005) show that our students are engaged in their undergraduate experience as compared to selected peer and Carnegie peer institutions. The descriptive listing of indicators provided below signify mean responses for FR & SR that were less than our peer institutions.

Academic and Intellectual Experiences

  • Prepared two or more drafts of a paper or assignment before turning it in (FR & SR)

  • Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.) (FR & SR)

  • Had serious conversations with students of a different race or ethnicity than your own (FR & SR)

    Problem Sets

  • Number of problem sets that take you more than an hour to complete (FR & SR)

    Additional Collegiate Experiences (NEWER QUESTIONS)

  • Participated in activities to enhance your spirituality (worship, meditation, prayer, etc.) (FR & SR)

  • Examined the strengths and weaknesses of your own views on a topic or issue (FR & SR)

  • Tried to better understand someone else's views by imagining how an issue looks from his or her perspective (FR & SR)

    Enriching Educational Experiences

  • Foreign language coursework (FR & SR)

    Time Usage

  • Working for pay off campus (FR & SR)

  • Providing care for dependents living with you (parents, children, spouse, etc.) (FR & SR)

    Satisfaction

  • If you could start over again, would you go to the same institution you are now attending? (FR & SR)

National Survey of Student Engagement, SRU, 2006


Nsse benchmark comparisons
NSSE - Benchmark Comparisons Focus ???

  • The Benchmark Comparisons report compares the performance of SRU with our selected peers or consortium, selected Carnegie Peers, and all 2006 institutions.

  • To focus discussions on the importance of student engagement and guide institutional improvement efforts, NSSE created five clusters or “benchmarks” of effective educational practice:

    • Level of Academic challenge – including the number and length of written reports, hours spent studying and preparing for class, reading requirements, and the need to synthesize and organize ideas

      (SRU FR and SR Means were higher than Selected Peers and Carnegie Peers).

    • Active and collaborative learning – including working with other students inside and outside class, participating in class discussions, making presentations, tutoring, and community-based projects. (SRU FR and SR Means were higher than Selected Peers and Carnegie Peers).

    • Student-faculty interaction – including faculty feedback, working with faculty on research projects and other activities, and discussing assignments and career plans with faculty. (SRU FR and SR Means were higher than Selected Peers and Carnegie Peers).

    • Enriching educational experiences – including interaction with students of diverse economic, social, and racial backgrounds, community service and volunteer work, learning communities, internships, practicum, field work, independent study, and culminating senior experiences. (SRU FR and SR Means were equal to or higher than Selected Peers and Carnegie Peers).

    • Supportive campus environment – including how campuses help students cope with non-academic responsibilities like work and family, the quality of relationships with faculty, administration, and other students, and the presence of social supports. (SRU FR and SR Means were higher than Selected Peers and Carnegie Peers).


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse

How often do our students make class presentations? Focus ???

First-Year

Seniors

SRU 2004 – 2.24 SRU 2005 – 2.33 SRU 2006 – 2.32 Peers - 2.24 Masters – 2.28 NSSE 2006 – 2.23

SRU 2004 – 3.09 SRU 2005 – 3.11 SRU 2006 – 2.99 Peers - 2.83 Masters – 2.87 NSSE 2006 – 2.79

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse1

Worked with other students on projects during class? Focus ???

First-Year

Seniors

SRU 2004 – 2.53 SRU 2005 – 2.58 SRU 2006 – 2.54 Peers - 2.43 Masters – 2.41 NSSE 2006 – 2.40

SRU 2004 – 2.77 SRU 2005 – 2.77 SRU 2006 – 2.73 Peers - 2.61 Masters – 2.58 NSSE 2006 – 2.51

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse2

How often have our students worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student life activities, etc.) as compared with other institutions nationally?

First-Year

Seniors

SRU 2004 – 1.61 SRU 2005 – 1.67 SRU 2006 1.76 Peers - 1.49 Masters – 1.53 NSSE 2006 – 1.55

SRU 2004 – 2.10 SRU 2005 – 2.06 SRU 2006 – 1.98 Peers - 1.73 Masters – 1.76 NSSE 2006 – 1.81

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often

Seniors

SRU – 2.36 * Master’s – 1.79 NSSE 2003 – 1.85

SRU – 1.71 * Masters – 1.53 NSSE 2003 – 1.56


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse3

How often have our students discussed grades or assignments with an instructor?

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often

First-Year

Seniors

SRU 2004 – 2.57 SRU 2005 – 2.67 SRU 2006 – 2.54 Peers - 2.51 Masters – 2.62 NSSE 2006 – 2.62

SRU 2004 – 2.84 SRU 2005 – 3.01 SRU 2006 – 2.90 Peers - 2.79 Masters – 2.86 NSSE 2006 – 2.87

Seniors

SRU – 2.36 * Master’s – 1.79 NSSE 2003 – 1.85

SRU – 1.71 * Masters – 1.53 NSSE 2003 – 1.56


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse4

How often have our students received prompt feedback from faculty on your academic performance (written or oral)?

First-Year

Seniors

SRU 2004 – 2.56 SRU 2005 – 2.86 SRU 2006 – 2.73 Peers - 2.54 Masters – 2.58 NSSE 2006 – 2.58

SRU 2004 – 2.89 SRU 2005 – 3.06 SRU 2006 – 2.99 Peers - 2.76 Masters – 2.79 NSSE 2006 – 2.76

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often

Seniors

SRU – 2.36 * Master’s – 1.79 NSSE 2003 – 1.85

SRU – 1.71 * Masters – 1.53 NSSE 2003 – 1.56


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse5

How often have our students participated in community service or volunteer work?

First-Year

Seniors

SRU 2004 – .38 SRU 2005 – .42 SRU 2006 - .36 Peers - .33 Masters – .35 NSSE 2006 – .37

SRU 2004 – .56 SRU 2005 – .63 SRU 2006 - .72 Peers - .52 Masters – .54 NSSE 2006 – .59

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often

Seniors

SRU – 2.36 * Master’s – 1.79 NSSE 2003 – 1.85

SRU – 1.71 * Masters – 1.53 NSSE 2003 – 1.56


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse6

How often have our students participated in a learning community or some other formal program where groups of students take two or more classes together?

First-Year

Seniors

SRU 2004 – .38 SRU 2005 – .46 SRU 2006 - .36 Peers - .15 Masters – .15 NSSE 2005 – .15

SRU 2004 – .35 SRU 2005 – .42 SRU 2006 .40 Peers - .23 Masters – .24 NSSE 2005 – .25

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often

Seniors

SRU – 2.36 * Master’s – 1.79 NSSE 2003 – 1.85

SRU – 1.71 * Masters – 1.53 NSSE 2003 – 1.56


What have we learned about college student engagement from the nsse7

How often have you talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor?

Sample

What Have We Learned About College Student Engagement from the NSSE?

How often have our students discussed ideas or readings or classes with faculty members outside of class?

First-Year

First-Year

SRU 2004 – 1.79 SRU 2005 – 1.84 SRU 2006 – 2.58 Peers - 1.36 Masters – 1.39 NSSE 2006 – 1.40

SRU 2004 – 2.13 SRU 2005 – 2.20 SRU 2006 – 2.17 Peers - 2.08 Masters – 2.09 NSSE 2006 – 2.10

Seniors

SRU – 2.36 * Master’s – 1.79 NSSE 2003 – 1.85

SRU – 1.71 * Masters – 1.53 NSSE 2003 – 1.56

1-never, 2-sometimes, 3- often, & 4- very often


Using nsse data

Discover current levels of engagement (institution, major field, year in school)

Determine if current levels are satisfactory (criterion reference, normative or peer comparison)

Target areas for improvement

Modify programs and policies accordingly

Teach students what is required to “succeed”

Monitor student & institutional performance

Using NSSE Data

Areas of

Effective

Educational

Practice

Areas for

Institutional

Improvement


Internal campus uses
Internal Campus Uses field, year in school)

  • Gauge status of campus priorities

  • Examine changes in student engagement between first and senior years

  • Assess campus progressover time

  • Encourage dialogue aboutgood practice

  • Link with other data to test hypotheses, evaluateprograms

  • Improve curricula, instruction, services

LearningCommunities

1ST Year and Senior Experience

EnrollmentManagement

InstitutionalResearch

AcademicAffairs

Institutional

Improvement

Middle-StatesAssessment

StudentAffair

FacultyDevelopment

PeerComparison

AcademicAdvising


Campus uses internal
Campus Uses (Internal) field, year in school)

  • Gauge status of campus priorities

  • Examine changes in student engagement between first and senior years

  • Assess campus progress over time

  • Encourage dialogue about good practice

  • Link with other data to test hypotheses, evaluate programs

  • Improve curricula, instruction, services


Campus uses external
Campus Uses (External) field, year in school)

  • Assess status vis-à-vis peers, competitors

  • Identify, develop, market distinctive competences

  • Encourage collaboration in consortia (e.g., state-wide NSSE conference)

  • Provide evidence of accountability for good processes (while awaiting improvement in outcomes)


External campus uses

PASSHE field, year in school)

FundRaising

Parents

ProspectiveStudents

Media

AccreditingBodies

Alumni

StatePolicyMakers

Focus on Right Things

PerformanceIndicators

External Campus Uses

  • Assess status vis-à-vis peers, competitors

  • Identify, develop, market distinctive competencies

  • Encourage collaboration in consortia (e.g., state-wide NSSE conference)

  • Provide evidence of accountability for good processes (while awaiting improvement in outcomes)

PublicAccountability


How do i find out more
How Do I Find Out More? field, year in school)

NSSE Website

www.nsse.iub.edu

.


Considerations for reporting on the nsse results
Considerations for Reporting on the NSSE Results field, year in school)

  • Send reports to the Provost, Cabinet, & Deans’ Council

  • Send reports to different faculty groups (assessment, liberal studies program, curriculum committee, TLTR, etc.)

  • Use with student life groups (activities, organizations, honoraries, intercultural communications, residence life, etc.)

  • Send to faculty working with first year students (orientation, FYRST Seminar, Learning Communities, FR courses, etc.)

  • Faculty working with senior students (capstone experiences, internships, etc.)

  • Enrollment Services Groups, including Recruitment and Retention planning (student satisfaction)


Ideas for using presenting nsse
Ideas for Using/Presenting NSSE field, year in school)

  • Institutional Strategic Planning – Connect to strategic objectives, promote strengths, target areas for improvement

  • Benchmarking and National Comparisons

  • Use in accreditation self-study

  • Development Office

  • Local news piece on how we look

  • Special institutional campaign on student engagement

  • Program Reviews

  • Alumni reports (magazine, reunion)


Nsse institute for effective educational practice
NSSE Institute for Effective Educational Practice field, year in school)

  • Documents and disseminates policies and practices that more fully engage students in productive learning activities

  • Determines strategies for guiding schools in using engagement data to develop success-oriented institutional cultures


Questions and Discussion field, year in school)


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