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GRADE BAND: 3-5. Fall 2011 Mathematics SOL Institutes. Grade Band Team Members Vickie Inge, University of Virginia Patricia Robertson, Arlington Public Schools, retired Beth Williams, Bedford County Public Schools Vandi Hodges, Hanover County Public Schools, retired.

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Fall 2011 mathematics sol institutes

GRADE BAND: 3-5

Fall 2011 Mathematics SOL Institutes

Grade Band Team Members

Vickie Inge, University of Virginia

Patricia Robertson, Arlington Public Schools, retired

Beth Williams, Bedford County Public Schools

Vandi Hodges, Hanover County Public Schools, retired


Today s institute objective
Today’s Institute Objective

To improve mathematics instruction by providing district-level trainers with professional development resources focused on facilitating students' mathematical understanding through mathematical problem solving, communication, reasoning, connections, and representation.


Comparing and ordering fractions
Comparing and Ordering Fractions

1/15, 1/20, 10/11, 8/9, 5/8,

5/7, 3/5, 4/9, 6/12, 13/11, 3/4

  • Work alone for 5 minutes to put these fractions in order from least to greatest.

  • Do not use a common denominator or convert to a decimal.


Comparing and ordering fractions1
Comparing and Ordering Fractions

1/15, 1/20, 10/11, 8/9, 5/8,

5/7, 3/5, 4/9, 6/12, 13/11, 3/4

  • Work with a shoulder partner to justify that the fractions are in the correct order.

  • Which ones were easier to determine?

  • How did you think about completing this task?


Comparing and ordering fractions2
Comparing and Ordering Fractions

1/15, 1/20, 10/11, 8/9, 5/8,

5/7, 3/5, 4/9, 6/12, 13/11, 3/4

  • What are the big ideas about fractions brought forward by this task?

  • Which fractions were the easiest to compare?

  • Which fractions were the more challenging?


Mathematics standards of learning for virginia public schools 2009 handout
Mathematics Standards of Learning for Virginia Public Schools, 2009 Handout

Virginia

Process

Goals

  • Goals Introductory Paragraph

  • Mathematical Problem Solving Goal

  • Mathematical Communication Goal

  • Mathematical Reasoning Goal

  • Mathematical Connections Goal

  • Mathematical Representations Goal


Mathematical process skills student look fors
Mathematical Process Skills Student Look-fors Schools, 2009 Handout

  • Read your assigned part of the handout.

  • Underline the key ideas.

  • Share findings between table partners.


Fraction track activity
Fraction Track Activity Schools, 2009 Handout

You need:

  • Fraction Cards

  • Fraction Track Game Board

  • 20 beans /counters

  • Play with 1 or 2 players or with 2 pairs.

    Playing to 1

  • Use only the fraction cards that are equal to 1 whole or less than 1. Mix the cards, and place the deck of cards facedown.

  • Use one Completed Fraction Track Game Board that goes to 1 for each pair of players.

  • Place seven beans on the game board, one on each track, at zero.

  • Players take turns drawing the top card and moving a bean (or beans) to total the amount on the card.

  • The goal is to use a series of moves to have beans land on exactly the number 1. When you land on 1 you win the bean. When a bean is won, place a new bean at 0 on the same track so that the next play has a bean on every track for the next player’s turn.

  • If you cannot move the total amount of your Fraction Card you lose that turn.

Adapted from NCTM Illuminations


Fraction track activity1
Fraction Track Activity Schools, 2009 Handout

Closing Reflection Questions:

  • What were some of the strategies you used to play the game?

  • What mathematical concepts are connected to the strategies?


Preparing to view the video
Preparing to View the Video Schools, 2009 Handout

Use the Mathematical Process Skills -“Student Look-fors” Recording Form Handout while viewing the video.

Review the indicators under the Skill Area your table was assigned.

In the note’s section record specific evidence to support the indicator(s) observed in the assigned Skill Area.


Mathematics process skills student look fors table group debrief
Mathematics Process Skills “Student Look-fors” Table Group Debrief

At the top of the paper, write the Skill Area the table group addressed.

As a group select one or two the indicators in your assigned Skill Area that seemed to be most visible.

On the chart paper record specific evidence for one or two indicators identified in the Skill Area.

Post your chart on the wall.

Return to your table and discuss charts for other Skill Areas.



  • Analyze the unpacked standard.

  • Identify the Mathematical Process Skills and specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard.

  • Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.


Encourage mathematical communication with talk moves
Encourage Mathematical Communication with Talk Moves and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.

  • Teacher revoices a student’s reasoning for the purpose of clarification and advancing student thinking.

  • Student revoices another student’s reasoning to make sense themselves and advance the other students’ reasoning and understanding.

  • Asking students to justify or prove someone else’s reasoning. Using justification or proof to allow for respectful discussion of ideas.

  • Asking student to build on the group’s reasoning by connecting and extending another student’s idea.

  • Wait time (means to make the other things happen).


Task sort
Task Sort and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.

Divide up the tasks so that at least 2 people will complete each task in the set.

Write on the task whether you consider the task low or high cognitively demanding.

Work independently before discussing with your partner whether you thought it was a low or high cognitively demanding task.

Discuss the tasks that you and your partner solved.

Read the remainder of the tasks and without working these tasks indicate if you think the task is a low or high cognitively demanding tasks.


Characteristics of rich mathematical tasks
Characteristics of and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.Rich Mathematical Tasks

High cognitive demand (Stein et. al, 1996; Boaler & Staples, 2008)

Significant content(Heibert et. al, 1997)

Require Justification or explanation (Boaler & Staples, in press)

Make connections between two or more representations (Lesh, Post & Behr, 1988)

Open-ended (Lotan, 2003; Borasi &Fonzi, 2002)

Allow entry to students with a range of skills and abilities

Multiple ways to show competence (Lotan, 2003)


Task analysis guide lower level demands
Task Analysis Guide – and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.Lower-level Demands

Involve recall or memory of facts, rules, formulae, or definitions

Involve exact reproduction of previously seen-material

No connection of facts, rules, formulae, or definitions to concepts or underlying understandings

Require limited cognitive demand

Focused on producing correct answers rather than developing mathematical understandings

Require no explanations or explanations that focus only on describing the procedure used to solve

Adapted from Stein, M.K., Smith, M.S., Henningsen, M.A., & Silver, E.A. (2000). Implementing standars-based mathematics instruction: A casebook for professional development. New York, NY: Teachers College Press


Task analysis guide higher level demands
Task Analysis Guide – and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.Higher-level Demands

  • Focus on use of procedures for developing deeper levels of understanding of concepts and ideas

  • Suggest broad general procedures with connections to conceptual ideas (not narrow algorithms)

  • Provide multiple representations to develop understanding and connections

Adapted from Stein, M.K., Smith, M.S., Henningsen, M.A., & Silver, E.A. (2000). Implementing standars-based mathematics instruction: A casebook for professional development. New York, NY: Teachers College Press


Task analysis guide higher level demands1
Task Analysis Guide – and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.Higher-level Demands

DOING Mathematics

Require complex, non-algorithmic thinking and considerable cognitive effort

Require exploration and understanding of concepts, processes, or relationships

Require accessing and applying prior knowledge and relevant experiences to facilitate connections

Require task analysis and identification of limits to solutions

Adapted from Stein, M.K., Smith, M.S., Henningsen, M.A., & Silver, E.A. (2000). Implementing standars-based mathematics instruction: A casebook for professional development. New York, NY: Teachers College Press


Factors associated with impeding higher level demands
Factors Associated with and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.Impeding Higher-level Demands

Shifting emphasis from meaning, concepts, or understanding to the correctness or completeness of the answer

Providing insufficient or too much time to wrestle with the mathematical task

Letting classroom management problems interfere with engagement in mathematical tasks

Providing inappropriate tasks to a given group of students

Failing to hold students accountable for high-level products or processes

Adapted from Stein, M.K., Smith, M.S., Henningsen, M.A., & Silver, E.A. (2000). Implementing standars-based mathematics instruction: A casebook for professional development. New York, NY: Teachers College Press


Consolidating today s work
Consolidating Today’s Work and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.

Today we have looked at:

  • Using rich task to engage students

  • Using the Cognitive Demand Framework to analyze mathematical tasks

  • Identifying the Mathematical Process Goals called for in the standards in the Virginia SOL Curriculum Framework

  • Using the Process Goals and “Student Look-fors” in the classroom setting

  • Encouraging mathematical conversation using Talk Moves in the classroom setting


Consolidating today s work1
Consolidating Today’s Work and where possible specific indicators that are implicit and/or explicit in the Standard. Record ideas in the Classroom Instruction column.

Exit Card:

As you reflect on our work together today respond to the following question: When a classroom teacher pays attention to each of these areas how is student engagement and ultimately student learning impacted?


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