Pronoun helping verbs and prepositions
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Pronoun, Helping Verbs, and Prepositions. Pronouns. A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun or another pronoun in a sentence or a phrase. Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, you, they, them, yourself, myself, himself, herself, yourselves, whom etc. Example sentences:

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Pronoun, Helping Verbs, and Prepositions

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Pronoun helping verbs and prepositions

Pronoun, Helping Verbs, and Prepositions


Pronouns

Pronouns

  • A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun or another pronoun in a sentence or a phrase.

  • Examples of pronouns: he, she, it, you, they, them, yourself, myself, himself, herself, yourselves, whom etc.

  • Example sentences:

    David reads the paper; he reads it every morning. The pronoun ‘he’ replaces the noun ‘David’ and ‘it’ replaces ‘paper’. The boys didn’t make the team and they were very sad. The pronoun ‘they’ replaces the noun ‘boys’. Jane sent her mother yellow roses which are her favorite flowers. The pronoun ‘which’ replaces the noun ‘roses’ and the possessive pronoun ‘her’ stands in for the possessive noun ‘mothers’.


Helping verbs

Helping Verbs

  • Helping Verbs- Auxiliary or helping verbs help out the main verb in a sentence. They are used in verb conjugation to show the progressive and the perfect tenses of verbs.

  • The following table lists some of the helping verbs:


Primary and modal h elping v erbs

Primary and Modal Helping Verbs

Primary helping verbs

Modal helping verbs

Modal helping verbs help “modify” the main verb so that it changes the meaning, somewhat. They help express possibility and necessity. Examples: can, could, may, might, will, would, shall, should, and must.

  • Be, do, and have are considered the primary helping verbs. They are considered so because they can help the main verb or actually be the main verb.


Prepositions

Prepositions

  • Prepositions are words that show relationship between a noun, pronoun, and some other elements of a sentence. They link nouns, pronouns, and phrases to other words in a sentence.

  • A phrase is a group of words that lacks either a subject or a verb and functions as a single part of speech.

  • A prepositional phrase is made up of the preposition, its object, and any associated adjectives or adverbs.

  • Prepositions are only used in phrases.

  • The object of a preposition always asks a question with who or what after the preposition.

  • Prepositional phrases never contain a subject or a verb.


Pronoun helping verbs and prepositions

Some commonly used prepositions are listed in the table below:


Pronoun helping verbs and prepositions

Some compound prepositions are listed in the table below:


References

References

  • http://www.k12reader.com/helping-verbs/

  • http://www.writingcentre.uottawa.ca/hypergrammar/preposit.html

  • http://www.english-grammar-revolution.com/what-is-a-preposition.html


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