Response to literature writing
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How to write about something you’ve read. (And some funny photos of dogs) *Important Note: DO NOT attempt to recreate any of the images you will see. No dogs were harmed throughout the creation of this PowerPoint Presentation. I love dogs and all other living creatures.

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Response to literature writing

How to write about something you’ve read.

(And some funny photos of dogs)

*Important Note: DO NOT attempt to recreate any of the images you will see. No dogs were harmed throughout the creation of this PowerPoint Presentation. I love dogs and all other living creatures.

Response to Literature Writing


Step 1 brainstorm
Step 1: Brainstorm

  • Reread the prompt and make sure you understand the question that’s being asked.

  • Quickly write down your ideas for how you’d like to answer the prompt.

  • Plan/organize your essay

    • Use a thinking map (tree maps work well)


Part 1 introduction
Part 1- Introduction

  • 3 Ingredients:

    • 1. HOOK

    • 2. TAG/Who & What

    • 3. THESIS


Introduction part 1 hook
Introduction- Part 1: Hook

First, you need a HOOK to grab the reader’s attention

  • Action Introduction: An action introduction takes the reader into the middle of an action sequence. It forces the reader to read on to find out not only the significance of this moment in time, but what led up to it.

  • Question: Use a thought-provoking question to emotionally appeal to your reader or arouse their curiosity.

  • Contradictory Phrase Introduction: Use this strategy to clear up common misconceptions about your topic

  • Quotation: Choose a quote with a meaning you plan to reveal to the reader as the paper progresses.

  • Anecdote: Provide a personal story or experience that would help the reader identify with your point of view.


Introduction part 2 background info context
Introduction- Part 2: Background Info./Context

  • Include the TAG (Title, Author, Genre) to identify the story

  • Quickly summarize the short story in no more than 2 sentences.

    • Tell who and whatthe story is about.


Introduction part 3 thesis
Introduction- Part 3: Thesis

  • Your THESIS is the answer to the question in the prompt.

  • A good thesis will:

    • Be arguable and focused.

    • Leave no unanswered questions for the reader.

    • Provide a map to guide the reader through your essay.

    • Answer the prompt, the whole prompt, and nothing but the prompt.

    • Avoid the first person point of view.

    • Avoid vague or unclear language.

    • Be included in the end of the introduction paragraph.


Body paragraphs
Body Paragraphs

  • 4 Ingredients:

    • 1. STATE

    • 2. SUPPORT

    • 3. EXPLAIN

    • 4. Concluding Sentence

  • A good essay will have more than one Body Paragraph.


Body paragraphs1
Body Paragraphs

  • 1. STATE Sentence

    • This is your MAIN POINT of the paragraph

    • This must help explain your THESIS


Body paragraphs2
Body Paragraphs

  • 2. SUPPORT

    • A quote or specific example from the story that supports your STATE Sentence

  • 3. EXPLAIN

    • This is when you explain your thoughts and opinions about why the quote and/or example helps support your STATE Sentence


Body paragraphs3
Body Paragraphs

  • 4. Concluding Sentence

    • Wrap up what you said without repeating yourself

    • Use a transition to build a bridge to the next paragraph


Conclusion
Conclusion

  • First, REWORD (don’t repeat) your thesis

  • Commentary/ “Worldly-Wise” Statement: What does the reader learn from this story?

  • End with a bang!

    • Leave the reader with something interesting to think about.



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