Media portrayals of obese persons:
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 1

Study Design and Procedure Experiment 1 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 54 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Media portrayals of obese persons: The impact of positive versus stigmatizing images on attitudes and image preferences RL Pearl, RM Puhl, & KD Brownell, Yale University Department of Psychology. Study Design and Procedure Experiment 1

Download Presentation

Study Design and Procedure Experiment 1

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Study design and procedure experiment 1

Media portrayals of obese persons: The impact of positive versus stigmatizing images on attitudes and image preferencesRL Pearl, RM Puhl, & KD Brownell, Yale University Department of Psychology

  • Study Design and Procedure

  • Experiment 1

  • Online survey with 2x2 design in which participants viewed 1 of 4 images from Rudd Center image gallery:

    • Stigmatizing Image (White or Black woman)

    • Positive Image (White or Black woman)

  • Positive images can be found at http://www.yaleruddcenter.org/press/image_gallery_intro.aspx

  • Experiment 2

  • 2x2 Design:

    • Stigmatizing Image (White man or woman)

    • Positive Image (White man or woman)

  • Both Experiments

  • After viewing the image, participants completed measures for the following:

    • Social Distance Attitudes: 6 items, 5-point Likert scale

      • “I wouldn’t mind being friends with the person in this image.”

    • Public Attitudes: 5-point Likert scale

      • Negative Attitudes (2 items)

        • “This image makes me dislike obese people.”

      • Image Preferences (2 items)

        • “I wish that the media wouldn’t use images like this.”

    • Independent Variables

      • Gender, age, race, weight and height (to calculate BMI)

      • Past experience with weight bias (yes or no)

      • Perceived age and weight of the model

      • FAT version of Universal Measure of Bias (UMB-FAT),

        • Subscales: Negative Judgment, Distance*, Attraction, Equal Rights

        • *“I don’t enjoy having a conversation with a fat person.”

STUDY DESIGN & PROCEDURE

RESULTS

Conclusions

RESULTS

ABSTRACT

Pervasive bias against overweight and obese persons in society is associated with negative physical and mental health outcomes for those who are stigmatized. Media images depicting obese persons in a stereotypical and stigmatizing manner perpetuate this bias, so it was hypothesized that non-stereotypical, positive images could reduce biased attitudes towards obese persons. To test this hypothesis, two online surveys were administered in which participants viewed either a stigmatizing or positive image of an obese model.

In Experiment 1 (N = 146), participants viewed a photograph of either a Caucasian or African American obese woman; in Experiment 2 (N = 145) participants viewed either a Caucasian male or female obese model. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze outcomes for social distance attitudes towards the obese models depicted in the images, in addition to other negative attitudes and image preferences.

Participants who viewed the stigmatizing images endorsed stronger social distance attitudes and more negative attitudes towards obese persons than participants who viewed the positive images, and there was a stronger preference for the positive images than the stigmatizing images. These results were consistent regardless of the race or gender of the obese model pictured.

The findings indicate that more positive media portrayals of obese individuals may help reduce weight stigma and its associated negative health outcomes.

Unadjusted Means

Public Attitudes

Experiment 1

Experiment 2

*For Image Preferences, lower scores indicate stronger preference.

Hierarchical Linear Regression Models

Social Distance Attitudes

  • In both experiments, participants who viewed the positive images expressed less negative attitudes towards obese persons than those who viewed the stigmatizing images.

  • Participants expressed stronger preference for the positive versus the stigmatizing images.

  • In Experiment 2, participants expressed less negative attitudes towards the female model, but the effect of image condition on negative attitudes was marginally smaller for the female model versus the male model.

INTRODUCTION

CONCLUSION

  • Weight bias and stigma refer to negative, stereotypical attitudes towards and discriminatory behaviors against individuals who are overweight or obese. For example, obese individuals are often distanced from or avoided by others in public situations.

  • Experiencing weight stigma is associated with negative physical and mental health outcomes, including: low self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, anxiety, major depression, suicidal ideation and attempts, binge eating, exercise avoidance, poor cardiovascular health, under-utilization of health care services, and lower health-related quality of life.

  • Portrayals of obese persons in news and popular media are often stereotypical and stigmatizing. Evidence suggests that images alone influence public attitudes, so utilizing more positive images may be an effective strategy for reducing weight bias and stigma, as well as increasing public support for obesity prevention and treatment efforts.

  • Current Study’s Aims:

  • Test the impact of stigmatizing versus non-stereotypical, positive portrayals of obesity on:

    • Desire for social distance from obese persons

    • Biased, negative attitudes towards obese persons

    • Image preferences

  • Explore differences in attitudes and preferences by manipulating the race and gender of the obese person portrayed in the images

In both experiments, positive portrayals of obese persons evoked more pro-social attitudes, greater image preference, and less negative attitudes than stigmatizing portrayals. These findings have implications for both media practices and public health. The common usage of negative images may reinforce internalization of weight bias among overweight and obese persons, but the use of positive images may help buffer this effect, reducing negative emotional and physical outcomes linked to weight bias internalization.

While media images have previously been found to reinforce and perpetuate stigma, these findings suggest that the media has the power to correct this problem by changing the type of images used in journalistic reporting and other forms of media communication. The media has a documented ability to shape public perceptions about health and social issues, so discontinuing the use of stigmatizing images may stop the spread of inaccurate perceptions about obese persons, and help increase public support for obesity prevention and treatment efforts.

Given the consistent associations between weight stigma and poor health outcomes, a change in media practice from using stigmatizing images to featuring non-stereotypical, positive portrayals of obese persons could have a substantial impact on public attitudes and public health.

SAMPLE

  • *No interaction emerged between Image Condition and Model Race or Gender, so the interaction term was dropped from the analyses.

  • In both experiments, participants who viewed the positive images expressed weaker social distance attitudes than those who viewed the negative, stigmatizing images.


  • Login