Dgp monday notes parts of speech
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DGP MONDAY NOTES (Parts of Speech). NOUNPRONOUNADVERB ADJECTIVE PREPOSITIONS CONJUNCTION VERB VERBAL. NOUN person, place, thing, idea... Common: begins with lower case letter (city) Proper: begins with capital letter (Memphis)

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DGP MONDAY NOTES (Parts of Speech)

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Dgp monday notes parts of speech

DGP MONDAY NOTES(Parts of Speech)

NOUNPRONOUNADVERB

ADJECTIVE PREPOSITIONS

CONJUNCTION VERB VERBAL


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

NOUNperson, place, thing, idea...

Common: begins with lower case letter (city)

Proper: begins with capital letter (Memphis)

Possessive: shows ownership(girl’s)


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

PRONOUNS

take the place of a noun…hence the word…proNOUN

6 Types of pronouns…

personal

reflexive

relative

interrogative

demonstrative

indefinite


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

Personal PRONOUN

1st person…pronouns having to do with “me”

2nd person…pronouns having to do with “you”

3rd person…pronouns having to do with everyone else


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

Personal PRONOUN continued:

Singular nominative…I, you, he, she, it

Plural nominative…we, you, they

Singular objective…me, you, him, her, it

Plural objective…us, you, them

Singular possessive…my, your, his, her, its, mine, yours

Plural possessive…our, your, their, ours, yours, theirs


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

Reflexive PRONOUN

reflects back to “self”

Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves

hisself…ourself…thierselves

WORDS DO NOT EXIST IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ANYWHERE!

(Think uneducated when used!)


Relative pronoun starts dependent clauses that which who whom whose

Relative PRONOUN

starts dependent clauses

that

which

who

whom

whose


Interrogative pronoun asks a question which whose what whom who

Interrogative PRONOUN

asks a question

Which?

Whose?

What?

Whom?

Who?


Demonstrative pronoun demonstrates which one this that these those

Demonstrative PRONOUN

demonstrates which one

this

that

these

those


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

Indefinite PRONOUN

does not refer to a definite person or thing

each, either, neither, some, all, most, several, few, many, none, one, someone, no one, everyone, anyone, somebody, nobody, everybody, anybody, more, much, another, both any, other, etc.


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

ADVERBS modify

adjectives really cute

verbs carefully planned

other adverbs very easily

ADVERBS tell… How? When? Where? To what extent?

NOTisALWAYSanAdverb


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

ADJECTIVES modify

nouns I have a green pen.

pronouns They are happy.

ADJECTIVEStell… Which one?

How many?

What kind?

Articles… a, an, and the are Adjectives


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

PREPOSITIONS…shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and some other word in the sentence

Think about a squirrel and the tree

or a spider and its web, they can… across, after, against, around, at, before, below, between, by, during, except, for, from, in, of, off, on, over, since, through, to, under, until, with, according to, because of, instead of, etc.


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

CONJUNCTION…joins words, phrases, and clauses

3 Types of CONJUNCTIONS

coordinating

subordinating

correlative


Coordinating f for conjunction a and n nor b but o or y yet s so

Coordinating Ffor

CONJUNCTIONAand

Nnor

Bbut

Oor

Yyet

Sso


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

SubordinatingCONJUNCTION

start dependent clauses (and therefore must be followed by the subject and verb)

after, since, before, while, because, although, so that, if, when, whenever, as, even though, until, unless, as if, etc.


Correlative conjunction not only but also neither nor either or both and

CorrelativeCONJUNCTION

not only/but also

neither/nor

either/or

both/and


Verbs shows the action or helps to make a statement 3 types of verbs action linking helping

VERBS… shows the action or helps to make a statement

3 types of VERBS

action

linking

helping


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

Action VERBS…shows action

She wrotea note.

Linking VERBS…links two words together

is, be, am, are, was, were, been, being, appear, become, feel, grow, look, remain, seem, smell, sound, stay, taste

English is fun (English = fun)

The game is on Saturday. (action)

The flower smells pretty. (flower = pretty)

The dog smells the flower. (action)


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

VERBtenses

Present…happening now (jump, talk, eat, falling, is falling, am falling)

Past…happened previously (jumped, talked, ate, fell, was falling)

Future…will happen in the future (will jump, shall talk, will be eating)

Present perfect…have or has plus past participle (have jumped, has talked, have been eating, has been falling)

Past perfect…had plus the past participle (had jumped, had talked, had been eating)

Future perfect…will have or shall have plus past participle (will have jumped, shall have talked, will have been eating)


Dgp monday notes parts of speech

VERBALSare verbs that do not behave as a verb

Gerunda verb that acts like a noun and ends in “-ing”…Reading is fun. (subj.) I hate shopping. (D.O.) Use pencils for drawing. (O.P)

Participlea verb that acts like an adjective and ends in

“-ing” or “-ed” (or other past tense ending)…I have running shoes. Frightened, I ran down the street. It’s an unspoken rule.

Infinitive to + verb…can act like a noun (I like to eat), adjective (It’s the best place to eat), or adverb (I need a pen to write a letter)


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