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OBJECTIVES. The participants will: Define creativity and innovation. Identify the importance of creativity and innovation in fire service organizations. Analyze the elements of creativity. Identify the 5 steps of the creative process. OBJECTIVES (cont'd).

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OBJECTIVES

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OBJECTIVES

The participants will:

  • Define creativity and innovation.

  • Identify the importance of creativity and innovation in fire service organizations.

  • Analyze the elements of creativity.

  • Identify the 5 steps of the creative process.


OBJECTIVES (cont'd)

  • Evaluate personal blocks to creativity.

  • Identify ways of fostering creativity in subordinates.

  • Identify effective techniques for selling new ideas.

  • Develop strategies to enhance creative leadership traits.


OVERVIEW

  • Icebreakers

  • What is Creativity? What is Innovation? Why Are They Important?

  • Elements of Creativity

  • The Creative Process


OVERVIEW (cont'd)

  • Creativity Blocks

  • Fostering Creativity in Subordinates

  • Selling Your Ideas to Top Management

  • Self-Assessment and Personal Improvement Strategies


ICEBREAKER #1

1000

40

1040

1000

40

1000

30

1000

20

1000

4090

Total

1000

40

1000

30

1000

3070

1000

40

1000

2040

Total

Total

1000

40

1000

30

1000

20

1000

10

4100

Total

1000

40

1000

30

1000

20

3090

1000

40

1000

30

2070

Total

Total

Total


How many squares are in this figure?


3

1

4

2

7

5

8

6

11

9

12

10

15

13

16

14

16 small squares

1 large square


16 + 1 =17

The 4 quadrants

17 + 4 = 21


16 + 1 =17

4

4 inset boxes of 4 squares + 1 center box of 4 squares

21 + 5 = 26


16 + 1 =17

4

5

4 inset boxes of 9 squares

26 + 4 = 30


DEFINITION

Creativity is the ability to produce original ideas or products.


DEFINITION (cont'd)

Innovation is the ability to improve a present practice, method, or product by adaptation or alteration.


THE IMPORTANCE OF CREATIVITY

  • To keep up with external changes

  • To assure state-of-the-art methods and techniques


Myths About Creativity from The Creative Manager By Camille Cates Barnett

Myth #1: The more intelligent you are, the more creative you are.

Reality: Creativity is not a function of intelligence. Creativity is seeing what everyone else has seen and thinking what no one else has thought.


Myth #2: People are born creative; creativity cannot be learned.

Reality: It's true. People are born creative--that is, all of us are. But we can acquire skills to help us achieve our creative potential. Creativity can be learned, much as tennis and piano can be learned. Do you remember the first time you ever tried to ride a bicycle?


Myth #3: Creative ideas come in a flash, like lightning bolts.

Reality: Persistence and concentration are keys to creativity. You can't plant a garden until you have prepared the soil.


Myth #4: Creativity is disruptive to the day-to-day life of an organization.

Reality: Successful organizations are really two parallel, mutually supportive organizations--one innovative, one routine. Remember that every routine was once an innovation.


Myth #5: Creativity is a luxury; it should be encouraged only in times of abundance.

Reality: When you don't have money to throw at a problem you need to be more creative. Necessity is the mother of invention.


Myth #6: True creativity is found primarily in the arts and has little practical business application.

Reality: According to Princeton's Creative Research, Inc., 80 percent of corporate sales are from products unknown 10 years ago. Forty percent of the gross national product is attributable to research and development during the past 15 years.


ELEMENTS OF CREATIVITY

Element #1 Fluency


ELEMENTS OF CREATIVITY

Element #1 Fluency

Element #2 Flexibility


How could you make this equation read correctly without moving a match?

=


A woman dropped her watch. The face broke into 4 parts. The numbers on each part added up to 15.

Draw a picture of how the watch face might have been broken.


ANSWER

12

11

1

10

2

9

3

8

4

5

7

6


ELEMENTS OF CREATIVITY

Element #1 Fluency

Element #2 Flexibility

Element #3 Originality


ELEMENTS OF CREATIVITY (cont'd)

Element #1 Fluency

Element #2 Flexibility

Element #3 Originality

Element #4 Awareness


ELEMENTS OF CREATIVITY (cont'd)

Element #1 Fluency

Element #2 Flexibility

Element #3 Originality

Element #4 Awareness

Element #5 Drive


A NEW IDEA

  • A new combination of existing ideas

  • An adaptation of existing ideas


STEPS LEADING TO NEW IDEAS:

  • Preparation

  • Concentration

  • Incubation

  • Illumination

  • Verification/Production


S-C-A-M-P-E-R

FLUENCY

S-C-A-M-P-E-R

DRIVE

FLEXIBILITY

S - What can you substitute?

C - What can you combine?

A - What can you adapt?

M -What can you magnify, miniaturize, or multiply?

P - What can you put to other uses?

E - What else? Who else? Where else?

R - Can you rearrange or reverse?

AWARENESS

ORIGINALITY


CREATIVITY BLOCKS

"I don't want to look foolish."

"I don't want to fail."

"I'm not creative."

"That's not my area (skill, style, etc.)."

"I don't get paid to have fun."


TEN RULES FOR STIFLING INNOVATION(From The Change Masters By Rosabeth Moss Kanter)

  • Be suspicious

  • Be inaccessible

  • Pass the buck

  • Criticize at every opportunity


RULES (cont'd)

  • Discourage people from letting you know when there's a problem

  • Control everything carefully

  • Make significant policy changes in secret

  • Keep people in the dark


RULES (cont'd)

  • Pass on your dirty work in the name of delegation and participation

  • Above all else, never forget that you, the supervisor, know everything there is to know


CHARACTERISTICS OF SUPERVISORS WHO FOSTER CREATIVITY

  • They are willing to absorb the risks taken by subordinates.

  • They are comfortable with half-developed ideas.

  • They are able to make quick decisions.

  • They are good listeners.


CHARACTERISTICS OF SUPERVISORS WHO FOSTER CREATIVITY (cont'd)

  • They don't dwell on past mistakes.

  • They enjoy their jobs.

  • They expect subordinates to succeed.

  • They capitalize on subordinate strengths.


ASSESSING THE "SELLABILITY" OF YOUR IDEA

Will it work?

  • Has it been tested?

  • Is it practical?

  • Is it distinctly better than the present way?


ASSESSING THE "SELLABILITY" OF YOUR IDEA (cont'd)

Will people accept it?

  • Will it improve quality?

  • Will it increase productivity?

  • Will it use personnel more effectively?

  • Will it improve present methods?

  • Will it improve safety?

  • Will it eliminate unnecessary work?

  • Will it reduce costs?

  • Will it improve working conditions?


ASSESSING THE "SELLABILITY" OF YOUR IDEA (cont'd)

Is your idea timely?

  • Is it fully developed?

  • Is top management ready for it?

  • If it's approved, are you ready to act on it?

  • Are you sure it doesn't conflict with other projects that already have top-management approval/priority?


DEVELOPING A PERSUASIVE ARGUMENT

  • Relate your idea to a recognized need

  • Appeal to positive values

  • Anticipate objections

  • Get others involved

  • Ensure your credibility


SUMMARY

  • Each person has creative/innovative potential

  • We can improve our creative ability

  • COs must foster creativity in subordinates

  • COs must be skilled in "selling" new ideas to management


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