Contractors on the Battlefield  It Could Happen to You    Issues and Courses of Action

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2. http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/dod/n02052003_200302057.htm http://www.xp.hq.af.mil/xpx/xpxt/DOCS/The%20USAF%20Transformation%20Flight%20Plan%20FY03-07.pdf http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/dod/n02052003_200302057.htm http://www.xp.hq.af.mil/xpx/xpxt/DOCS/The%20USAF%20Transformation%20Flight%20Plan%20FY03-07.pdf

3. Agenda Contractor Support Benefits and Concerns Contracting Considerations LOGCAP / AFCAP Overview Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) Contracting in Iraq “You have Successfully Implemented Requirements When…”

4. Types of Contractors Theater Support (Contingency Contracting) Provide Goods, Services, and Minor Construction, Usually from the Local Commercial Sources External Support Prearranged Contracts to Support the Mission Army Logistics Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP) Air Force Civil Augmentation Program (AFCAP) Navy Construction Capability (CONCAP) Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) Systems Contractors Support Fielded Vehicles, Weapon Systems, Aircraft, Command and Control (C2) Infrastructure Theater Support Theater support contractors support deployed operational forces under prearranged contracts, or contracts awarded from the mission area, by contracting officers serving under the direct contracting authority of the Army principal assistant responsible for contracting (PARC) or other Service/joint/multinational chief of contracting responsible for theater support contracting in a particular geographical region. Theater-support contractors provide goods, services, and minor construction, usually from the local commercial sources, to meet the immediate needs of operational commanders. Theater support contracts are the type of contract typically associated with contingency contracting. External Support External support contractors provide a variety of combat and combat service support to deployed forces. External support contracts are let by contracting officers from support organizations such as United States (US) Army Materiel Command (USAMC) and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). They may be prearranged contracts or contracts awarded during the contingency itself to support the mission and may include a mix of US citizens, third-country nationals (TCN) and local national subcontractor employees. External support contracts include the Logistics Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP) administered through USAMC's logistics support elements (LSE), sister Service LOGCAP equivelent programs the Civil Reserve Air Fleet, commercial sealift support administered by the US Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), and leased real property and real estate procured by the USACE. Systems Contractors System contractors support many different Army materiel systems under pre-arranged contracts awarded by the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology (ASA[ALT]) program executive officer (PEO)/program manager (PM) offices and USAMC's Simulations, Training and Instrumentation Command (STICOM). Supported systems include, but are not limited to, newly or partially fielded vehicles, weapon systems, aircraft, command and control (C2) infrastructure, such as the Army Battle Command Systems (ABCS) and standard Army management information systems (STAMIS), and communications equipment. System contractors, made up mostly of US citizens, provide support in garrison and may deploy with the force to both training and real-world operations. They may provide either temporary support during the initial fielding of a system, called interim contracted support (ICS), or long-term support for selected materiel systems, often referred to as contractor logistic support (CLS). technical maintenance of weapon systems. maintenance, technical assistance, and equipment support. Contractor personnel deployed almost at the same time as the first U.S. troops and provided support mainly at echelons above corps. Some contractor field service representatives and contact teams were used in the corps and division area, and a few went into Iraq and Kuwait with combat elements. The ICT has defined three types of contractors and documented the definitions in FM's 100-10-2 and 100-21. Theater support contractors support deployed operational forces under prearranged contracts or under contracts awarded from the mission area by contracting officers serving under the direct contracting authority of the theater principal authority responsible for contracting (PARC). Theater support contractors provide goods and services and perform minor construction to meet the immediate needs of operational commanders. Contracting officers deploy immediately before and during the operation to procure goods, services, and minor construction, usually from local vendors or nearby offshore sources. Theater support contracting occurs according to the theater PARC's contracting support plan. This plan, which is an appendix to the logistics annex of the operation plan, campaign plan, or operation order, governs all procurement of goods, services, and minor construction within the area of operations. External support contractors provide support to deployed operational forces that is separate and distinct from either theater support or support provided by system contractors (see below). They may operate under pre-arranged contracts or contracts awarded during the contingency itself to support the mission. Contracting officers who award and administer external support contracts retain unique contracting authority derived from organizations other than the theater PARC. The Army Materiel Command (AMC), for example, provides commercial depot support by contracts through its commodity commands. Other organizations that provide external support contracts include the LOGCAP Program Office; the U.S. Transportation Command, which provides Civil Reserve Air Fleet and commercial sealift to support the theater; and the Army Corps of Engineers, which procures leased real property and real estate. These organizations retain contracting authority from their parent commands for those specific functions. Commanders and their staffs include these commands in their mission planning; they should include support appendices in the applicable staff section annex to the operation plan, campaign plan, or operation order. For example, the staff engineer coordinates Army Corps of Engineers procurement of real estate and real property, and the joint force transportation planner coordinates with U.S. Transportation Command component commands to monitor their assets. External support contractors establish and maintain liaison with the theater PARC as they conduct their unique support missions. They procure goods and services they need in the theater in accordance with the theater PARC's contracting support plan. System contractors support deployed operational forces under pre-arranged contracts awarded by program executive officers (PEO's), program managers (PM's), and AMC to provide specific support to materiel systems throughout their life cycle during peacetime and contingency operations. These systems include, but are not limited to, vehicles, weapon systems, aircraft, command and control infrastructure, and communications equipment. Contracting officers working for the PM's and AMC's major subordinate commands administer their system contractors' functions and operations through their contracts. AMC and the individual PM's maintain contracting authority for those contracts, plan required support for their systems, and coordinate that support with the supported commander in chief's planning staff. The contracting organization with responsibility for system contractors establishes and maintains liaison with the theater PARC or senior Army contracting official in theater as specified in the theater contracting support plan. These contractors procure goods and services they need in the theater as stipulated in the theater PARC's contracting support plan and published in the operation plan, campaign plan, or operation order. Note that these definitions do not include the term "contingency contractors," a term that has been in common use. This is because the term is not sufficiently precise for doctrine and policy publications; all contractors supporting military operations in an area of operations are contingency contractors. Theater Support Theater support contractors support deployed operational forces under prearranged contracts, or contracts awarded from the mission area, by contracting officers serving under the direct contracting authority of the Army principal assistant responsible for contracting (PARC) or other Service/joint/multinational chief of contracting responsible for theater support contracting in a particular geographical region. Theater-support contractors provide goods, services, and minor construction, usually from the local commercial sources, to meet the immediate needs of operational commanders. Theater support contracts are the type of contract typically associated with contingency contracting. External Support External support contractors provide a variety of combat and combat service support to deployed forces. External support contracts are let by contracting officers from support organizations such as United States (US) Army Materiel Command (USAMC) and the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). They may be prearranged contracts or contracts awarded during the contingency itself to support the mission and may include a mix of US citizens, third-country nationals (TCN) and local national subcontractor employees. External support contracts include the Logistics Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP) administered through USAMC's logistics support elements (LSE), sister Service LOGCAP equivelent programs the Civil Reserve Air Fleet, commercial sealift support administered by the US Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), and leased real property and real estate procured by the USACE. Systems Contractors System contractors support many different Army materiel systems under pre-arranged contracts awarded by the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology (ASA[ALT]) program executive officer (PEO)/program manager (PM) offices and USAMC's Simulations, Training and Instrumentation Command (STICOM). Supported systems include, but are not limited to, newly or partially fielded vehicles, weapon systems, aircraft, command and control (C2) infrastructure, such as the Army Battle Command Systems (ABCS) and standard Army management information systems (STAMIS), and communications equipment. System contractors, made up mostly of US citizens, provide support in garrison and may deploy with the force to both training and real-world operations. They may provide either temporary support during the initial fielding of a system, called interim contracted support (ICS), or long-term support for selected materiel systems, often referred to as contractor logistic support (CLS). technical maintenance of weapon systems. maintenance, technical assistance, and equipment support. Contractor personnel deployed almost at the same time as the first U.S. troops and provided support mainly at echelons above corps. Some contractor field service representatives and contact teams were used in the corps and division area, and a few went into Iraq and Kuwait with combat elements. The ICT has defined three types of contractors and documented the definitions in FM's 100-10-2 and 100-21. Theater support contractors support deployed operational forces under prearranged contracts or under contracts awarded from the mission area by contracting officers serving under the direct contracting authority of the theater principal authority responsible for contracting (PARC). Theater support contractors provide goods and services and perform minor construction to meet the immediate needs of operational commanders. Contracting officers deploy immediately before and during the operation to procure goods, services, and minor construction, usually from local vendors or nearby offshore sources. Theater support contracting occurs according to the theater PARC's contracting support plan. This plan, which is an appendix to the logistics annex of the operation plan, campaign plan, or operation order, governs all procurement of goods, services, and minor construction within the area of operations. External support contractors provide support to deployed operational forces that is separate and distinct from either theater support or support provided by system contractors (see below). They may operate under pre-arranged contracts or contracts awarded during the contingency itself to support the mission. Contracting officers who award and administer external support contracts retain unique contracting authority derived from organizations other than the theater PARC. The Army Materiel Command (AMC), for example, provides commercial depot support by contracts through its commodity commands. Other organizations that provide external support contracts include the LOGCAP Program Office; the U.S. Transportation Command, which provides Civil Reserve Air Fleet and commercial sealift to support the theater; and the Army Corps of Engineers, which procures leased real property and real estate. These organizations retain contracting authority from their parent commands for those specific functions. Commanders and their staffs include these commands in their mission planning; they should include support appendices in the applicable staff section annex to the operation plan, campaign plan, or operation order. For example, the staff engineer coordinates Army Corps of Engineers procurement of real estate and real property, and the joint force transportation planner coordinates with U.S. Transportation Command component commands to monitor their assets. External support contractors establish and maintain liaison with the theater PARC as they conduct their unique support missions. They procure goods and services they need in the theater in accordance with the theater PARC's contracting support plan. System contractors support deployed operational forces under pre-arranged contracts awarded by program executive officers (PEO's), program managers (PM's), and AMC to provide specific support to materiel systems throughout their life cycle during peacetime and contingency operations. These systems include, but are not limited to, vehicles, weapon systems, aircraft, command and control infrastructure, and communications equipment. Contracting officers working for the PM's and AMC's major subordinate commands administer their system contractors' functions and operations through their contracts. AMC and the individual PM's maintain contracting authority for those contracts, plan required support for their systems, and coordinate that support with the supported commander in chief's planning staff. The contracting organization with responsibility for system contractors establishes and maintains liaison with the theater PARC or senior Army contracting official in theater as specified in the theater contracting support plan. These contractors procure goods and services they need in the theater as stipulated in the theater PARC's contracting support plan and published in the operation plan, campaign plan, or operation order. Note that these definitions do not include the term "contingency contractors," a term that has been in common use. This is because the term is not sufficiently precise for doctrine and policy publications; all contractors supporting military operations in an area of operations are contingency contractors.

5. Contractor Support Areas Laundry and bath Clothing exchange Clothing repair Food service Mortuary affairs Sanitation Billeting Facilities management MWR Information management Personnel support Maintenance Transportation Medical services Engineering and construction Signal Retrograde Vector Control Power generation and distribution Physical security Water Purification and Treatment

6. Functions Contractors Cannot Perform Command and Control of U.S. Military and Civilian Personnel Armed Combat Contractors have supported, and will continue to support, the Army across the full spectrum of military operations, and they will be used in virtually all locations on the battlefield. However, there are three functions that contractors, by law, cannot perform— · Armed combat. The United States does not contract out its warfighting. · Command and control of U.S. military and civilian personnel. Command and control is a uniquely military function that cannot be contracted. · Contracting. The Army does not hire contractors to perform its contracting function. Except for these limitations, contractors can perform any Army function. This means that virtually all Army CS and CSS functions potentially are contractible. Today, contractors routinely perform such CS and CSS functions as transportation, maintenance, medical support, signal support, real estate management, and mortuary affairs. Contractors have supported, and will continue to support, the Army across the full spectrum of military operations, and they will be used in virtually all locations on the battlefield. However, there are three functions that contractors, by law, cannot perform— · Armed combat. The United States does not contract out its warfighting. · Command and control of U.S. military and civilian personnel. Command and control is a uniquely military function that cannot be contracted. · Contracting. The Army does not hire contractors to perform its contracting function. Except for these limitations, contractors can perform any Army function. This means that virtually all Army CS and CSS functions potentially are contractible. Today, contractors routinely perform such CS and CSS functions as transportation, maintenance, medical support, signal support, real estate management, and mortuary affairs.

7. Extend Existing Military Capabilities Relieve OPTEMPO for Sustained Operations Present Alternative Sources of Supplies and Services Provide Capabilities Where None Exist in the Military Key Member Assisting in Base Operations Planning Base Level Backfills Quick Response Support Core Staff for Planning Flexible Resource Option Commercial Equipment Use Quickly Increase or Decrease Available Support Resources Extend Existing Military Capabilities Relieve OPTEMPO for Sustained Operations Present Alternative Sources of Supplies and Services Provide Capabilities Where None Exist in the Military Key Member Assisting in Base Operations Planning Base Level Backfills Quick Response Support Core Staff for Planning Flexible Resource Option Commercial Equipment Use Quickly Increase or Decrease Available Support Resources

8. Contractor Support Considerations Medical/Dental Care Mess Quarters Special Clothing Weapons Mail Emergency Notification Communication

9. Operational Concerns Contractor Readiness/Skill Set Communication Chain with Military Leadership Priorities/Direction Feedback, Due Process, Funding, and Payment Safety/Treatment of Contractor Personnel Status of Forces Agreements “Combatant” Status Authorization to Carry Firearm Distinctive Uniform UCMJ vs. The Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act of 2000 CONTINUATION OF ESSENTIAL SERVICES (DODI 3020.37) Contract Clauses Insurance/Defense Base Act Contract Clauses Insurance/Defense Base Act

11. Items for Consideration During Contract Preparation Potential Areas of Deployment Physical/Health Requirements Specific Training or Qualifications Management Information Systems (MIS) Deployment/Redeployment Process Required Clauses Expedited Contracting Authorities Areas of deployment (to include potential hostile areas) and their associated risks. · Physical/Health limitations that may preclude contractor service in an theater of operations. · Contractor personnel reporting and accountability systems to include plans to address contractor personnel shortages due to injury, death, illness, or legal action. · Specific training or qualification(s) that will be required by civilian contractors to perform within a theater of operations, e.g. vehicle licensing, NBC, weapons. · Reimbursement for government provided services, e.g. medical/dental. · Interface between government and contractor Management Information Systems (MIS). · A plan to transition from peacetime operations to operations during conflict, war, and/or MOOTW, and a subsequent plan to transition back to peacetime. · A plan to transition mission accomplishment back to the government if the situation requires the removal of contractors. · Preparation for Overseas Movement (POM), Points of Embarkation/Debarkation for U.S. contractors, deployment/re-deployment into/from theater, and deployment of all contractor personnel through the specified CONUS Replacement Center. · When Status of Forces Agreements (SOFAs) do exist, they may not specifically address the status of contractor personnel. Contractor personnel status will depend on the nature of the specific contingency operations and those applicable SOFA provisions. Adequacy of contractor purchasing system Contractor Quality Program Contractor Property Management Past Performance Areas of deployment (to include potential hostile areas) and their associated risks. · Physical/Health limitations that may preclude contractor service in an theater of operations. · Contractor personnel reporting and accountability systems to include plans to address contractor personnel shortages due to injury, death, illness, or legal action. · Specific training or qualification(s) that will be required by civilian contractors to perform within a theater of operations, e.g. vehicle licensing, NBC, weapons. · Reimbursement for government provided services, e.g. medical/dental. · Interface between government and contractor Management Information Systems (MIS). · A plan to transition from peacetime operations to operations during conflict, war, and/or MOOTW, and a subsequent plan to transition back to peacetime. · A plan to transition mission accomplishment back to the government if the situation requires the removal of contractors. · Preparation for Overseas Movement (POM), Points of Embarkation/Debarkation for U.S. contractors, deployment/re-deployment into/from theater, and deployment of all contractor personnel through the specified CONUS Replacement Center. · When Status of Forces Agreements (SOFAs) do exist, they may not specifically address the status of contractor personnel. Contractor personnel status will depend on the nature of the specific contingency operations and those applicable SOFA provisions. Adequacy of contractor purchasing system Contractor Quality Program Contractor Property Management Past Performance

13. Items for Consideration During Proposal Evaluation Past Performance Project Management Cost Management Adequacy of Contractor Purchasing System Contractor Quality Program Contractor Property Management Resume’ vs. Position Skill Description Areas of deployment (to include potential hostile areas) and their associated risks. · Physical/Health limitations that may preclude contractor service in an theater of operations. · Contractor personnel reporting and accountability systems to include plans to address contractor personnel shortages due to injury, death, illness, or legal action. · Specific training or qualification(s) that will be required by civilian contractors to perform within a theater of operations, e.g. vehicle licensing, NBC, weapons. · Reimbursement for government provided services, e.g. medical/dental. · Interface between government and contractor Management Information Systems (MIS). · A plan to transition from peacetime operations to operations during conflict, war, and/or MOOTW, and a subsequent plan to transition back to peacetime. · A plan to transition mission accomplishment back to the government if the situation requires the removal of contractors. · Preparation for Overseas Movement (POM), Points of Embarkation/Debarkation for U.S. contractors, deployment/re-deployment into/from theater, and deployment of all contractor personnel through the specified CONUS Replacement Center. · When Status of Forces Agreements (SOFAs) do exist, they may not specifically address the status of contractor personnel. Contractor personnel status will depend on the nature of the specific contingency operations and those applicable SOFA provisions. Adequacy of contractor purchasing system Contractor Quality Program Contractor Property Management Past Performance Areas of deployment (to include potential hostile areas) and their associated risks. · Physical/Health limitations that may preclude contractor service in an theater of operations. · Contractor personnel reporting and accountability systems to include plans to address contractor personnel shortages due to injury, death, illness, or legal action. · Specific training or qualification(s) that will be required by civilian contractors to perform within a theater of operations, e.g. vehicle licensing, NBC, weapons. · Reimbursement for government provided services, e.g. medical/dental. · Interface between government and contractor Management Information Systems (MIS). · A plan to transition from peacetime operations to operations during conflict, war, and/or MOOTW, and a subsequent plan to transition back to peacetime. · A plan to transition mission accomplishment back to the government if the situation requires the removal of contractors. · Preparation for Overseas Movement (POM), Points of Embarkation/Debarkation for U.S. contractors, deployment/re-deployment into/from theater, and deployment of all contractor personnel through the specified CONUS Replacement Center. · When Status of Forces Agreements (SOFAs) do exist, they may not specifically address the status of contractor personnel. Contractor personnel status will depend on the nature of the specific contingency operations and those applicable SOFA provisions. Adequacy of contractor purchasing system Contractor Quality Program Contractor Property Management Past Performance

14. Contingency Contracting Prioritize and Consolidate Requirements Streamline Efforts with Efficient Contract Vehicles BOAs IDIQs Ordering Officers Reconcile with Comptroller-Daily Record Keeping- lost Docs D&Fs Sole Source Limiting Competition- not accepting lowest price, excluding bidders Contract vehicles- BOA, IDIQ, requirement contracts Record Keeping- lost Docs D&Fs Sole Source Limiting Competition- not accepting lowest price, excluding bidders Contract vehicles- BOA, IDIQ, requirement contracts

16. What is LOGCAP? Peacetime planning for use of civilian contractors during a contingency A Cost Plus Award Fee – Task Order Contract Halliburton – Kellog,Brown, and Root Services (KBR) PM at Army Material Command (AMC), VA PCO at Rock Island, IL 1% Base Fee, 2% Award Fee Current use Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence. The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence.

18. LOGCAP Task Order Elements Camp Construction Base Camp Maintenance Food Service Vector Control Laundry Service Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Supply Support Activity (SSA) Power Generation Procurement, Material, and Property Accountability The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence. The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence.

21. Who is AFCAP? Prime Contractor - Readiness Management Support (RMS) Subsidiary of Johnson Controls Located in Panama City, Florida Subcontractors CH2M Hill & SCI Group – Engineering & Design Flour – Construction, Procurement & Field Engineering Selrico – Life Support & Services Fritz Gov’t Services – Freight Forwarding (UPS) Midwest Air Traffic Control Services Mantech – Communications Services EODT – Ordnance & Explosives JCWS – Base Operating Support This is the basic set-up for our AFCAP contractor, Readiness Management Support, a subsidiary of Johnson Controls. They are located, conveniently enough in Panama City, Florida. They have access/networked with and or contacts with the following companies: CH2M Hill – Environmental, Architecture/Engineering and Ordnance and Explosives SCI Group Inc – Architecture/Engineering Selrico – Life Support and Services Mantech – Communications Services Midwest Air Traffic Control Services – Air Traffic Control & Airfield skills Fritz Government Services – Freight Forwarding (UPS) EODT – Ordnance and Explosives Flour – Construction, procurement, and field engineering skills JCWS – Base Operating SupportThis is the basic set-up for our AFCAP contractor, Readiness Management Support, a subsidiary of Johnson Controls. They are located, conveniently enough in Panama City, Florida. They have access/networked with and or contacts with the following companies: CH2M Hill – Environmental, Architecture/Engineering and Ordnance and Explosives SCI Group Inc – Architecture/Engineering Selrico – Life Support and Services Mantech – Communications Services Midwest Air Traffic Control Services – Air Traffic Control & Airfield skills Fritz Government Services – Freight Forwarding (UPS) EODT – Ordnance and Explosives Flour – Construction, procurement, and field engineering skills JCWS – Base Operating Support

22. What is AFCAP? A Cost Plus Award Fee – Task Order Contract Readiness Management Support (RMS) - 4 Feb 02 PM office is Air Force Civil Engineer Support Agency (AFCESA), Tyndall AFB PCO at 325th Contracting Squadron, Tyndall AFB Basic year plus five option years Available to Federal, State, or Local Gov’t Agency For Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence. The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence.

23. AFCAP Task Order Locations

24. Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA)

27. Matrixed Team Contractor Quality Manager Veterinarians Contracting Officer Technical Representative Escorts Base Personnel Defense Investigators/Auditors (DCIS/OSI/DCAA) Vendors Unapproved Sources Talk to and ensure they are personally involve in managing observing contractor performance. Contractor Quality Manager Veterinarians DFAC Food Vendors Contracting Officer Technical Representative Performance Evaluators Escorts Dining Facility Base Personnel Feedback System Senior Enlisted Advisor Defense Investigators/Auditors (DCIS/OSI/DCAA) Vendors Unapproved Sources Talk to and ensure they are personally involve in managing observing contractor performance. Contractor Quality Manager Veterinarians DFAC Food Vendors Contracting Officer Technical Representative Performance Evaluators Escorts Dining Facility Base Personnel Feedback System Senior Enlisted Advisor Defense Investigators/Auditors (DCIS/OSI/DCAA)

28. You have Successfully Implemented Requirements When: Contractor Efforts are Focused Management Controls Are In place Productivity is Increasing Costs are Controlled Contracts are Managed with Integrity and in Compliance with Applicable Law Mitigated Adverse Aspects of Contractor Nonperformance on Operations Understand Supply Chain Capability Maturity Model Contractor Efforts are Focused On Highest Priority Areas Management Controls Are In place to Ensure the Quality and Timeliness of Program Performance Capability Maturity Model Contractor Efforts are Focused On Highest Priority Areas Management Controls Are In place to Ensure the Quality and Timeliness of Program Performance

29. Contractor Efforts are Focused Use Contractor in Planning/Decision Making Meet Daily With Contractor Unauthorized Commitments/Ratifications are a Leadership Focus

30. Management Controls Are In Place Make Contractor Responsible for Quality System Surveillance Plan Functional Area POCs Document Surveillance Government Property Management Contractor Purchasing System Effective Recycling Program Government/Contractor Documentation Sound Contracting Officer Determinations Proper Record Keeping

31. Productivity Increasing Plan for Changes to Requirements Use AF 616 vs Form 9s Recognize Skilled Labor/Heavy Equipment Shortages Anticipate Customs Issues Plan for Changes to Requirements Canned SOWS Funding Line Use AF 616 vs Form 9s Recognize Skilled Labor/Heavy Equipment Shortages Hiring Standards Prioritization of Projects Anticipate Customs Issues Embassy Customs Personnel Ship Contract Items to Military Camp vs. Contractor Plan for Changes to Requirements Canned SOWS Funding Line Use AF 616 vs Form 9s Recognize Skilled Labor/Heavy Equipment Shortages Hiring Standards Prioritization of Projects Anticipate Customs Issues Embassy Customs Personnel Ship Contract Items to Military Camp vs. Contractor

32. Costs Are Controlled Cost Management Adequate Cost Reporting Budgeting and Estimate at Completion Cost Voucher Adequacy Lease vs. Buy Determinations Proper Payment for Construction Performance Based vs. Cost Incurred Manage Contractor Overtime Approve Requisitions over $2500 Timely Funding for Contract Changes/Options

33. Contracts are Managed with Integrity and in Compliance with Applicable Law Establish SOPs Document Required Corrective Actions Don’t Become the Contractor’s Trainer Use Award Fee to Fairly Evaluate Performance Document Findings Contractor Due Process Web Based System Understand Local Labor Law Sponsorship Severance Pay Overtime

34. Mitigated Adverse Aspects of Contractor Nonperformance on Operations Contingency Plan Know Contractor’s Employees Background Checks Hiring Standards Identified for Skilled Labor Local Culture Briefings Ensure Contractor Employees Understand UCMJ/SOFA/Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act of 2000 SOPs Stabilize camp operations. gov’t approval, training IAWSOPs Stabilize camp operations. gov’t approval, training IAW

35. Mitigated Adverse Aspects of Contractor Nonperformance on Operations Third Country Nationals (TCNs) Understand Religious Customs, Motivations Escort Requirements Interpreters Health Force Protection Drugs A local Iraqi mason builds a wall as the first step for Iraqi people to learn to build villages on July 16, 2003. The project was set up by the 926th Engineers of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), in hopes that the Iraqi people will develop their own building company in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Vincent Bryant) (Released) A local Iraqi mason builds a wall as the first step for Iraqi people to learn to build villages on July 16, 2003. The project was set up by the 926th Engineers of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), in hopes that the Iraqi people will develop their own building company in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Vincent Bryant) (Released)

36. Understand Supply Chain Understand Transportation System Recognize Long Lead Requirements/Funding Processes Develop Extended Vendor Base Team with Embassy/Chamber of Commerce Develop Local Purchasing System Proactively Resolve Customs Issues Recognize Contractor Limitations Air Sea Land Gov’t and commercial Shorten and more responsive Air Sea Land Gov’t and commercial Shorten and more responsive

37. Summary Ensure Contract is Written Properly to Provide Flexibility and Support Operations Choose Contractor with Proven History of Cost, Quality, and Property Management Give Yourself The Best Chance For Success Know Your Supply Chain (Names and Phone Numbers) Val’s Rule “Is What You Are Doing (or Not Doing) Supporting the Fight” Involve All Experts in Decision Making –compare cost schedule and performance and manpower-perform tradeoff to provide viable options Performance Standards Clear- Constant Interaction-ensure eyes are on target Recognize Contractor For Job Well Done Ensure Contract is Written Properly to Provide Flexibility and Support Operations Performance Standards Clear Choose Contractor with Proven History of Cost, Quality, and Property Management Purchasing System Give Yourself The Best Chance For Success Risk Manage/Prioritize/Develop Sound Options for the Boss Involve All Experts in Decision Making Know Your Supply Chain (Names and Phone Numbers) Understand Airlift/Sealift Customs Food Supplier and Routing Process Val’s Rule “Is What You Are Doing (or Not Doing) Supporting the Fight” Involve All Experts in Decision Making –compare cost schedule and performance and manpower-perform tradeoff to provide viable options Performance Standards Clear- Constant Interaction-ensure eyes are on target Recognize Contractor For Job Well Done Ensure Contract is Written Properly to Provide Flexibility and Support Operations Performance Standards Clear Choose Contractor with Proven History of Cost, Quality, and Property Management Purchasing System Give Yourself The Best Chance For Success Risk Manage/Prioritize/Develop Sound Options for the Boss Involve All Experts in Decision Making Know Your Supply Chain (Names and Phone Numbers) Understand Airlift/Sealift Customs Food Supplier and Routing Process Val’s Rule “Is What You Are Doing (or Not Doing) Supporting the Fight”

38. QUESTIONS??? [email protected]

40. Backup Slides

41. Sources Joint Publication 4.0, Doctrine for Logistic Support of Joint Operations Publication of FM 100-21, Contractors on the Battlefield, 26 March 2000 http://www.usafa.af.mil/jscope/JSCOPE00/Campbell00.html http://www.stuttgart.army.mil/community/Citizen/2001/1009/Civilians.htm http://www.osc.army.mil/others/Gca/battlefield.doc http://www.adtdl.army.mil/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/3-100.21/toc.htm http://www.sftt.org/PDF/article05152003a.pdf

42. CONTINUATION OF ESSENTIAL SERVICES (DODI 3020.37) Identify Essential Services/Personnel Terms of Contract Require Continuation of Essential Services Contingency Plan Identify Source of Support Resources Communication with Contractor Regarding Force Protection Insurance Equipment Importance to Mission Contractors who provide essential services should continue those services, under the terms and conditions of the contract, during periods of crisis until released or evacuated by military authority. Commander will prepare a contingency plan where there is reasonable doubt that essential services provided by a contractor will not continue. Particularly when operations may transition to a hostile environment, advance planning is essential to identify a backup source of support and the resources necessary to enable the contractor to continue or accept the risk if the support is not provided. Contractors who provide essential services should continue those services, under the terms and conditions of the contract, during periods of crisis until released or evacuated by military authority. Commander will prepare a contingency plan where there is reasonable doubt that essential services provided by a contractor will not continue. Particularly when operations may transition to a hostile environment, advance planning is essential to identify a backup source of support and the resources necessary to enable the contractor to continue or accept the risk if the support is not provided.

43. Required Contract Clauses (When Deployment of Contractors is Anticipated) FAR 52.228-3 Workers Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) FAR 52-228-4 Workers Compensation and War Hazards Insurance Overseas FAR 52-228-7000 Reimbursement for War Hazard Losses FAR 52-228-7003 Capture and Detention DFARS 252-225-7043 Antiterrorism Force Protection Policy For Defense Contractors Outside the United States DFARS 252-209-7001 Disclosure of Ownership or Control by the Government of a Terrorist Country

44. Quick Guide for New Acquisitions up to $2,500 Competition is not required [FAR 13.202] Oral solicitations allowed, except for construction over $2,000 [FAR 13.106-1] May use purchase cards [FAR 13.201]

45. Quick Guide for new acquisition over $2,500 up to $10,000 Soliciting one source allowed if CO determines urgent with only one source reasonably available [FAR 13.106-1]. FAR Part 6 does not apply; however, consider soliciting at least three sources. [FAR 6.001 and 13.104 ]. Oral solicitations are allowed, except for construction over $2,000. [FAR 13.106-1] May use purchase cards [FAR 13.201]. Soliciting one source allowed if CO determines urgent with only one source reasonably available [FAR 13.106-1]. FAR Part 6 does not apply; however, consider soliciting at least three sources. [FAR 6.001 and 13.104 ]. Each acquisition of supplies or services that has an anticipated dollar value over $2,500 but not exceeding $100,000 shall be set aside for small business (see FAR 19.0 00 and Subpart 19.5 ). See 19.502-2 for exceptions. [FAR 13.003] Oral solicitations are allowed, except for construction over $2,000. [FAR 13.106-1] May use purchase cards [FAR 13.201]. May use OF-347s (purchase made under unusual and compelling urgency) [FAR 13.306] with clauses, except EFT if payment is to be made using a purchase card [FAR 32.1110]. When obtaining oral quotes, the contracting officer shall inform the quoter of the EFT clause that will be in any resulting purchase order unless payment to be made using a purchase card [FAR 13.302]. No synopsis or posting requirements. Soliciting one source allowed if CO determines urgent with only one source reasonably available [FAR 13.106-1]. FAR Part 6 does not apply; however, consider soliciting at least three sources. [FAR 6.001 and 13.104 ]. Each acquisition of supplies or services that has an anticipated dollar value over $2,500 but not exceeding $100,000 shall be set aside for small business (see FAR 19.0 00 and Subpart 19.5 ). See 19.502-2 for exceptions. [FAR 13.003] Oral solicitations are allowed, except for construction over $2,000. [FAR 13.106-1] May use purchase cards [FAR 13.201]. May use OF-347s (purchase made under unusual and compelling urgency) [FAR 13.306] with clauses, except EFT if payment is to be made using a purchase card [FAR 32.1110]. When obtaining oral quotes, the contracting officer shall inform the quoter of the EFT clause that will be in any resulting purchase order unless payment to be made using a purchase card [FAR 13.302]. No synopsis or posting requirements.

46. Quick Guide for Acquisitions over $100,000 and up to $5,000,000 using Commercial Item Processes [FAR 13.5] Firm-Fixed-Priced or Fixed-Price with EPA Contracts Competition or Sole Source Justification Reduce Synopsis and Solicitation Time firm-fixed-priced or fixed-price with EPA contracts. FAR 12.207] SF 1449, Solicitation/Contract/Order for Commercial Items, is required over $100,000 [FAR 12.204 and 12.303] unless use streamlined CDB solicitation procedure. [FAR 12.603] Competition not required if sole source justification approved. [FAR 13.501]. FAR Part 6 competition requirements do not apply; however, consider soliciting at least three sources. [FAR 6.001 and 13.104]. Pricing requirements of FAR 15.4 apply. [FAR 12.209] May reduce synopsis and solicitation time. [FAR 12.603] firm-fixed-priced or fixed-price with EPA contracts. FAR 12.207] SF 1449, Solicitation/Contract/Order for Commercial Items, is required over $100,000 [FAR 12.204 and 12.303] unless use streamlined CDB solicitation procedure. [FAR 12.603] Competition not required if sole source justification approved. [FAR 13.501]. FAR Part 6 competition requirements do not apply; however, consider soliciting at least three sources. [FAR 6.001 and 13.104]. Pricing requirements of FAR 15.4 apply. [FAR 12.209] May reduce synopsis and solicitation time. [FAR 12.603]

47. Quick Guide for new emergency acquisition over $100,000 "non-commercial" FAR processes: Limit competition citing unusual and compelling urgency. Approval justification after award [FAR 6.302-2] Use oral solicitations [FAR 15.203] Issue Letter Contracts [FAR 16.603]

48. Examples of some SERVICESExamples of some SERVICES

49. Task Order Process

50. AFCAP Process Contract Modifications

51. Typical Task Order Elements Air Force construction efforts: Flight line, CAOC, MILCON, Munitions Storage Facilities, base operations, and facilities O&M of Power Generation Engineering design support Water Well Drilling The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence. The contract itself was awarded on February 4th, 1997 to Readiness Management Support or RMS owned by Johnson Controls. The new contract was awarded on 4 Feb 2002, also to RMS AFCAP is managed by AFCESA and administered by Tyndall’s Contracting Squadron. The new contract is an 8-year, cost plus award-fee contract. An award fee is the contractor’s primary incentive to perform. This award fee can vary between 4 to 6% of the total amount of a project called a task order depending on the nature of the work. An Award Fee Board from AFCESA meets every 6 months to determine the total award fee amount of all the task orders performed during that period. Though the board has the final decision on how much of the award fee the contractor receives, the decision is based primarily on inputs given by the customers overseeing each individual task order. The contract has a basic year and seven option years. During AFCAP’s basic year, the contractor was tasked to develop a Worldwide Management Plan. This is an extensive plan that explains in detail how the contractor would respond to any of the numerous contingencies. It is similar in nature to a Base Civil Engineer Contingency Response Plan but includes much more such as a database of worldwide resources available to them and the plans to execute contingencies in the Services career field. Any governmental agency may act as the requestor or customer for AFCAP support. Typically, Air Force Major Command Civil Engineers request a task order but there have been others. For example, the Immigration & Naturalization Service, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance have also been AFCAP customers. The contract allows for up to 404 million dollars of task orders through the life of the contract. Customers are responsible for funding individual task orders, while AFCESA pays for the RMS management team and office in Panama City, FL ($2.7M). We have awarded just over $150 million in AFCAP task orders in the first 5 years of its existence.

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