Asian language and culture implications for assessment and intervention
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 43

ASIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 82 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

ASIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION. I. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND**. ORIGINS: East Asia (Japan, Korea, China) Southeast Asia (Philippines, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Burma, Vietnam, Malaysia)

Download Presentation

ASIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


ASIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION


I. INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND**

  • ORIGINS:

  • East Asia (Japan, Korea, China)

  • Southeast Asia (Philippines, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Burma, Vietnam, Malaysia)

  • South Asia (Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka)

  • KEY RELIGIONS: Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism


Southeast Asia:


Between the years 2000-2010: **

  • 46% growth in the U.S. Asian population—more than any other racial group

  • Chinese largest, Filipinos second largest

  • Among Asian children and youth, more than 80% are children of immigrants


Overall average income level in U.S.**

  • Is highest for Asians

  • Asian Indians 2011 median income = $92,418


One problem for Asians…**

  • “model minority”

  • Needs may go unrecognized, unmet


Many Indians in the U.S. are Brahmin


II. CONTRASTNG BELIEFS, VALUES, AND PRACTICES**

TRADITIONAL ASIANMAINSTREAM

FatalismPersonal control over envt., one’s fate

Tradition, living with Change, future

the pastorientation


TRADITIONAL ASIANMAINSTREAM**

Group welfareSelf actualization,

privacy

Mutual interdependenceIndependence, indiv. autonomy

Hierarchy, rigid role statusEquality, status determined by achievement

ConformityChallenge authority


  • TRADIT. ASIANMAINSTREAM


For children, many Asian families believe (in contrast to traditional U.S. families)


III. CUSTOMS, COURTESIES, VALUES**

  • A. Customs and Courtesies

  • Hospitality

  • Modesty, humility

  • Respect for elders, teachers, authority figures


B. Communication Styles**

  • Formal rules of communication propriety based on relative status of interlocutors

  • May be considered appropriate to ask personal questions

  • Indirectness often the norm re: touchy subjects

  • Some Asians may smile or laugh when embarrassed or angry


For example, key Filipino cultural values:


IV. HEALTH CARE AND DISABILITIES**

Visible vs. invisible disabilities

Disabilities fate, karma, sins committed by ancestors

Families may be ashamed to bring a child for help if his/her disability represents sins committed by parents/ancestors


As SLPs…**

  • We may have trouble getting families to acknowledge disabilities and sign IEPs for special education services

  • What can we do when this happens?


V. ASIAN EDUCATION**

  • Hugely valued

  • In 2011, 50% of Asians 25 yrs. and older had a Bachelor’s degree or higher compared with 28.5% of all Americans

  • Asian children attend preschool at a higher rate than other groups


In most Asian countries, there is:**

  • Great respect for teachers

  • Heavy reliance on rote learning, memorization

  • Teachers are very authoritarian

  • Class is formal; teachers lecture

  • Teachers don’t admit mistakes


Differences--Asian and American Schools (Stevenson—compared Beijing & Chicago)


  • When asked what they’d wish for:


Abboud & Kim 2007 (cited in text):**

  • Role of Asian children in families: 1) respect elders and obey parents, 2) work hard and do well in school to secure a bright future

  • Many Asian parents work hard all day and morph into educators at night—that is their role

  • Asian parents put academics first, while other parents often put sports/athletics first; kids are too tired to study


VI. ASIAN LANGUAGE CONSIDERATIONS**

  • Introduction

    Many languages have numerous dialects


Some Languages are Tonal**

  • Khmer, Japanese, Korean not tonal languages

  • Vietnamese, Chinese, Laotian are tonal; each tone represents a meaning change

  • Vietnamese has 6 tones, for example


Please know in detail…

  • The charts on pp.

  • The chart on p. is not on the test 


Linguistically…


For example, in Singapore, people speak: (don’t need to memo each lang. for exam)**

  • Bengali

  • ChineseMalay

  • East PunjabiSindhi

  • EnglishTeluga

  • HindiThai

  • JapaneseKorean

  • Java


VII. IMPLICATIONS FOR PROFESSIONALS**

  • We may need to address the husband first because the wife is subordinate

  • It may be disgraceful for the family to admit to or discuss a child’s disability; entire family lineage disgraced—intervention may be rejected

  • Some families do not believe that it is important to talk with young children and babies; may not be open to early intervention


Narrative skills strong predictors of later language outcomes

This study attempted to create some norms for evaluating narrative skills of Cantonese-speaking children

Studied typically-developing subjects and those with specific language impairment (SLI)

To, Stokes, Cheung, & T’sou (June 2010 Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research) Narrative assessment for Cantonese-speaking children.**


The researchers found that:


These children also…


So we know that…**

  • Assessment of children’s narrative skills is very promising  differentiating lang. difference from LI


It is important for us to understand Filipinos…**

In 2000, there were 24,516 Filipinos in Sacramento County

  • In 2012, this had increased to 41,455 (69% increase)


Former students from this class:

  • Filipinos predominantly Roman Catholic—enlist help of priest, church members

  • Family--huge sacrifices to come to U.S. for a better life for Ch

  • 150 dialects


Tasha Ketphanh—Laos: (former student in this class)


Tasha (Laos; continued)


I have found that Asians…**

  • Are generally terrific to work with

  • Very appreciative

  • If they understand WHY, they will do carry over


  • Login