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Chaire interdisciplinaire de recherche en littératie et inclusion – Pavillon du Parc Interdisciplinary Chair in Literacy and Inclusion Université du Québec en Outaouais , Gatineau, Québec, Canada

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Chaire interdisciplinaire de recherche en littératie et inclusion – Pavillon du Parc

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Chaire interdisciplinaire de recherche en litt ratie et inclusion pavillon du parc

Chaireinterdisciplinaire de recherche

en littératie et inclusion – Pavillon du Parc

Interdisciplinary Chair in Literacy and Inclusion

Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, Québec, Canada

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Literacy and Inclusion: A shared responsibilityJulie Ruel, PhD Research activities coordinator, Pavillondu Parc, Gatineau, Québec, Canada; Co-chairholder, Interdisciplinary Chair in Literacy and Inclusion

Social Work Social Development 2012, Stockholm, July 8-12th


Chaire interdisciplinaire de recherche en litt ratie et inclusion pavillon du parc

Canada

Québec

Gatineau


Literacy a multifaceted reality

Literacy : A multifaceted reality

  • International Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (2003) (OECD and Statistics Canada, 2005) - 7 countries

    • % of the Quebec population aged 16-65 below level 3 “considered a suitable minimum level for coping with the increasing demands of the emerging knowledge society and information economy” (OECD and Stats-can, 1995, in 2005)

    • Prose literacy (48.6%)

    • Document literacy (50.5%)

    • Numeracy (53.1%)

    • Problem solving (72.2%)

  • Older group scores lower than younger group

  • Decline accelerates beyond age 46

  • 80 % aged >66 are below level 3

  • (Brinck, 2005; OECD and Statistics Canada, 2005; 2011)


Literacy a multifaceted reality1

Literacy : A multifaceted reality

Consequences of low literacy:

  • Lower levels of education

  • Increased unemployment… frequency, duration

  • Increased reliance on government financial support programs

  • Disadvantaged in terms of their health

  • Less likely to participate in adult learning

  • Less likely to interact with Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)

    ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  • Decreased citizen participation in the democratic process

    • Lower level of engagement in the community (e.g. social, volunteering)

    • Lower voter turnout

      (Brick, 2005 a & b; OECD and Statistics Canada, 2005, 2011)


Literacy a multifaceted reality2

Literacy : A multifaceted reality

Multiple literacies – Use of literacy in multiple contexts

5


Information literacy

Information literacy

6

  • In our information-overloaded society, an information-literate person:

    • Appreciates the value of information

    • Possesses competencies and techniques to reach, search and utilize a variety of information resources

    • Processes, discriminates, critically assesses and uses information effectively in his or her everyday life


Health literacy

Health literacy

7

Definition

“Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, evaluate and communicate information as a way to promote, maintain and improve health in a variety of settings across the life course.”(Rootman and Gordon-El-Bihbety, 2008: 13)

  • 60% of Canadian adults do not have the skills needed to adequately manage their health and health-care needs (CCL, 2008: 2)

  • ... compared to 48% of Canadian adults with low level of literacy (prose literacy)...


Health literacy1

Health literacy

8

  • Literacy as a health determinant:

    • Comparable to education, tobacco usage, nutrition, socioeconomic status (SES) (Agence de la santé publique du Canada, 2009)

    • Decrease in health problems correlates with increase in literacy levels (Roberts, 2009)

    • SES and Literacy: Hand-in-hand, lifelong (Roberts, 2009)

  • Importance of good “Health communication”


Financial literacy

Financial Literacy

9

Definition

“Having the knowledge, skills and confidence to make responsible financial decisions” (Task force on financial literacy, 2011)

  • “ Knowledge” means understanding personal and broader financial matters.

  • “ Skills” are the ability to apply that knowledge in everyday life.

  • “ Confidence” means feeling self-assured enough to make important decisions. This is often a key factor in galvanizing people into action.

  • “ Responsible financial decisions ,” means that people will be able to use the knowledge, skills and confidence they have gained to make choices that are appropriate to their own circumstances.

    (Task force on financial literacy, 2011)


Digital literacy

Digital literacy

10

  • Link between regular use of computer and Internet – and literacy competencies(Lacroix 2006)

  • From now on, digital literacy is included in literacy competencies(Statistics Canada, 2007)

  • Growing gap between users and non-users of ICT:

    • potential cause of social exclusion(WHO, 2007)

  • Digital skills timeline : from mastering phase to application, to reflective phase:

    • Effective and efficient use of digital technology … towards complex cognitive, evaluative and reflective skills (Chinien & Boutin, 2011, adapted from Martin & Grudziecki, DigEuLit, 2006)

  • Digital Native or Digital Immigrant? (Prensky, 2001)


Learning and literacy

Learning and literacy

11

  • 33% of teenagers have a low or very low level of literacy(Willms, 2004).

  • Between 20 % and 40 % of Canadian students don’t have the literacy competencies to be competitive in a world economy(McCracken et Murray, 2009).

  • New challenges: Inclusion of students in situation of handicap

  • E.g. University students : UQO – from 30 students in 2007 to 97 in 2011 (+ 223%).

    • Traditional and emerging situations

  • Need better knowledge on UID – UDL (Universal Instructional Design – Universal Design for Learning)


Visual literacy

Visual literacy

12

Definition

Visual literacy is the ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image.

Visual literacy is based on the idea that pictures can be “read” and that meaning can be communicated through a process of reading.

  • Can we read images?

  • Can we ease the reading of images?


A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility

A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility

Why?

  • Participation in society requires multiple literacies

    But…

  • A significant percentage of the population is lacking in one or more literacies …


A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility1

A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility

Tensions

IncreaseIndividualliteracy

competencies

Increasecommunity and

services competencies

to takeintoaccount

the literacylevel

of their population


A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility2

A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility

ENVIRONNEMENT

Capacity of the surroundings to …

- Increase interaction

- Support the people…

- Developfavourablecontexts to participation

PERSON

Competencies…

- Knowledge…

- Skills …

- Criticalknowledge

15


A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility3

A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility

Inclusive perspective of literacy

  • It is incumbent upon communities and services to rethink their approach in better serving their population, taking into account the literacy levels of their more-vulnerable populations

  • In doing so, communities and services foster the development of inclusive environments engaging all segments of the population.


Chaire interdisciplinaire de recherche en litt ratie et inclusion pavillon du parc

A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility

Social participation

Develop inclusive services and communities

Develop individual

literacy competencies

Low-literacy population

Literacy level


A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility4

A shift from an individual to a collective responsibility

Evolution of the concept of literacy

Alphabetisation – basic literacy

Reading and writing

Criticalthinking

Citizen participation


Chaire interdisciplinaire de recherche en litt ratie et inclusion pavillon du parc

A shift from an

individual to a collective responsibility

A definition of literacy

  • Ability to understand and utilize language, numbers, ICT and images in interaction and exchanges, to grasp one’s environment, to acquire new knowledge, and develop one’s full potential, as an individual and full citizen, equal in every respect.

    It follows that…

  • Communities and services should share responsibility for enabling accessibility to the social uses of language, numbers, ICT and images, in their respective contexts.

    (CIRLI, 2012)


Cirli research chair

CIRLI - Research chair

Chaireinterdisciplinaire de recherche

en littératie et inclusion – Pavillon du Parc

Universitédu Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, Québec, Canada

Interdisciplinary Chair in Literacy and Inclusion


Cirli objectives

CIRLI objectives

Implement research program :

  • To provide strategies designed to ease inclusion of different segments of the populations with low literacy

  • Increasing citizens’ participation, voicing citizens’ opinions, and supporting inclusive communities.


Accomplishments strategies

Accomplishments – strategies


Chaire interdisciplinaire de recherche en litt ratie et inclusion pavillon du parc

Personswhoneedeasy-reading documents to increasetheir full participation

23

23


Strategies

Strategies

  • Sensitization activities

    • Cities … Universal design committees …Public services … Universities

  • Development of Research projects

    • Accessible intervention plan – and assessment of resilience

    • Developing a program to support children, families and dental workers in improving autistic children’s oral health

    • To document the support-team requirements for helping an adult with disabilities to integrate into a workplace, assisted with ICT devices

    • Requirements for university communities to welcome and better serve students in situation of handicap


Questions comments

Questions – comments

  • Thank you !!!!

  • Julie Ruel

  • [email protected]


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